Pacers deserve applause for doing right by employees through lockout

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That’s right. While the Los Angeles Lakers are shredding staffing during the lockout despite making more money every day from merchandising than most teams in the league probably make in ticket sales in an average day, and the league is torching employees while executives still draw huge paychecks, the little old Indiana Pacers are doing right by their employees. From the Indianapolis Business Journal:

Despite the labor rift between National Basketball Association owners and players, Indiana Pacers President Jim Morris says he doesn’t plan to lay off any of the organization’s 170 employees—at least for now.

“We’ve worked in a steady way over a number of years to get the [operational] team in exact order,” Morris said. “We don’t anticipate any changes to that at this time.”

Despite the lockout that threatens to cancel a good portion, if not the entire, upcoming season, Morris said there is plenty of work to keep staffers busy.

via Pacers: Lockout won’t sting employees, ticket holders | 2011-07-22 | Indianapolis Business Journal | IBJ.com.

So again, a team that many think should be contracted, actually planned for the lockout and won’t have to lay off anyone, despite losing significant revenue. (*Cough* overpaid for Danny Granger and Mike Dunleavy *cough.) The Pacers need to have this recognized by fans and the city of Indianapolis. There’s something to be said for operating your business in a responsible way, instead of just shredding salary to pad your own pockets during a lockout you orchestrated.

Meanwhile, this interesting bit caught my eye as well.

The Pacers face financial challenges of their own.

The team lost a combined $60 million during the 2008-09 and 2009-10 seasons, Morris said. Though he wouldn’t reveal the team’s loss last season, he said it was “significant.”

You’re noticing this quite a bit, particularly in light of the BRI results from last year. Basically, for all the moaning and whining from the BILLIONAIRE owners, their business was up last year. It wasn’t enough to overcome, you know, having to pay Troy Murphy or Dunleavy, or any of the other zillion poor decisions that cost them, but it was enough to limit the damage. But you’re not going to hear those results. You’re just going to hear about all the losses and the nightmares they’ve had to endure during the economic recession.

There’s no question that NBA team business has suffered over the past several years, nor that changes are needed to modify the system. But you’re also going to continue to see this deliberate leveraging of information to fit the narrative they want sold, no matter what the actual data might show.

(HT: IamaGM.com)