PBT’s RetroBall: Pistons-Bulls ’89 and Jordan’s good bad day

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Since billionaire owners and millionaire players are bitterly divided over how much money they’ll be splitting over the coming years and have locked us out of actual basketball to talk about, PBT will be regaling you this summer on the weekends with RetroBall. Using the advanced powers of the internet and NBATV, we’ll bring you interesting stories from years gone by. If nothing else, it will provide us an opportunity to make fun of fashion and culture from the past, which is always a giggle.

We begin our RetroBall series by accident. Yesterday I was asked by someone on Twitter if Jordan had ever fouled out as a member of the Chicago Bulls. A reasonable question, considering the insane amount of leeway Jordan got as a Bull when he became, you know, MJ. I dutifully looked it up on play index, curious in my own right, and found it had happened six times in his career. It never happened after the Bulls won their first championship in ’91. But when I looked at the list, I found myself fixating on his lowest point-total game.

On January 31st, 1989, the Bulls hosted the eventual champion Pistons in Chicago. The Pistons dominated the Bulls that season in both the regular and postseason, eventually losing in the Eastern Conference Finals to Isiah and the Bad Boys (4-2). But this January game was interesting in that it was such an example of Jordan being Jordan. He shot 24 times, hitting only seven shots for a 29% field goal percentage. He scored just 21 points, in a season he averaged 32.5. He fouled out of the game. Yet he also had a triple-double, with 12 rebounds and 10 assists. So he had this terrible game… and yet still scored 21 points with 12 rebounds, 10 assists, 2 steals and a block…. but he also had five turnovers. He accounted for 37.4% of all possessions for the Bulls, factoring FGA, FTA, and turnovers. What a bizarre game.

Thanks to the very helpful Vincent Goodwill of the Detroit News, I got my hands on a YouTube copy. Since I was six at the time, and living in rural Arkansas, I shockingly did not receive the TBS broadcast of the game. So I decided to sit down and watch it. What follows are my observations thereof. (Please bear in mind that seeing as how I was six and wouldn’t become interested in the league for another six years, my observations of both teams at this time are incomplete at best, shoddy at worst. Think of it as something to keep in mind before we make incomplete judgment on today’s players.)

  • It’s striking how despite the fact that 37% of the offense in this game goes through Jordan, he primarily plays off-ball for the majority of the first-half. He’s not even scowling at it, really. Though when he does receive the ball, the moves are all instantaneous. They manage to be simultaneously without hesitation and spontaneous. No one pounced quicker on any opportunity than Jordan. You see the same thing from Kobe Bryant, but his ability to adjust isn’t as flawless.
  • The Pistons’ help defense is borderline insane on Jordan in this game. Thrice his defender plays hard to the screen before the pick comes, and the low help defender (twice it’s Laimbeer) comes up from the block to guard it just in case. This means the entire left side is open which means that the second Jordan bursts left, he’s got nothing but baseline. It results in seven points for Jordan total.
  • Isiah Thomas starts off remarkably shaky in this game. He keeps trying to find the elbow-jumper, but it clatters out on him multiple times. He’s picking up turnovers left and right (he’ll wind up with seven over the course of 51 minutes, accounting for a lower percentage than four other players. Most of his first-half turnovers are the result of bad passes from teammates.
  • Being reminded of just how brutal these Bad Boys were on defense, I want to issue an apology to the 2005 Detroit Pistons, the 2007 San Antonio Spurs, the 2010 Boston Celtics, and 2011 Chicago Bulls for ever complaining about how ugly their games are. They might as well be run-and-gunners in comparison. You know how everyone above the age of 35 talks about how much more physical these games were? They’re right. The question of “Was he making a play on the ball?” is pretty laughable here. Twice the Pistons merely hammer Jordan, going so far as completing their turn after contract and just slamming their sides into him. Once they actually trap his ankles between two trips on a drive. It’s jarring. And it works. Jordan’s jumper never does get wet, and the help defense coming to the elbow smothers him. Particularly, Vinnie Johnson plays extremely admirable work in the stead of Joe Dumars who missed nearly a month from January to February. Johnson not only provides excellent offense, but works to get up in Jordan’s grill, even forcing an airball off a fadeaway. This despite giving up over four inches to Jordan.
  • Speaking of Johnson, his game here reminds me a lot of Marcus Thornton. I’m rebuked on Twitter for it, but Johnson is a smaller two-guard who loves pull-up no-conscience jumpers and has the same kind of frame. Thornton is taller, shoots a lower percentage, and isn’t as good at assists at this point in his career, but the numbers are similar otherwise, as are their comparative styles.
  • So this happened:
  • source:
  • Beautiful, isn’t it?
  • Also, this: source:
  • Okay, maybe not so beautiful.
  • Horace Grant is unbelievable in this game. He winds up with sixteen points on 7-11 shooting, and 18 rebounds along with 2 assists, a steal and a block. Twice he simply waits for the defense to all turn towards Jordan on the perimeter and catching the lob. It makes you feel sorry for Derrick Rose who has no such option.
  • If Jordan has a good bad day, Laimbeer has a bad good day. He’s forced too far out by the Bulls’ motion on and off-ball, and when he does recover, twice on Scottie Pippen, his teammates foul. But in cleaning up, he’s impeccable. If the defense breaks down for a half-second and Laimbeer catches, it’s over. The Bulls have no one who can attack him at the rim. Or near it, as that’s where Laimbeer shoots from.
  • Scottie Pippen is long. I understand this is not news, but bear in mind this is early on, before the Bulls’ gained all that veteran weight. At this point he’s like a bunch of brooms stuck together with a giant eraser on top. Pippen’s in his second season here, and the aggressiveness is mind-boggling. You can tell Pippen hasn’t fully embraced sidekick status. He’s near-suicidal in attacking the Pistons. Off the steal he’s taking two steps to get into the paint then exploding forward. But just as his youth gives him the advantage of explosion, it hurts him with the officials. He makes it to the line just four times.
  • Fascinating subplot: Rodman off the bench takes over on defending Jordan. Because Rodman is just in his third year (though 27), or maybe just because he’s guarding Jordan, he’s taking to the cleaners by Jordan and the officials. Twice in the third quarter Jordan clears out with his left at a Byron Russell level, and gets away with it clean.
  • Doug Collins hopes you enjoy this old tune, “In the Air Tonight.”
  • Adrian Dantley shoots 3-13 and has 20 points. He gets to the line 18 times (eight more than Jordan!) and the calls are legit. He works over pretty much anyone the Bulls throw at him. He’s the biggest reason Pippen winds up with four fouls just minutes into the third. In fifteen days, he’ll be traded to the Dallas Mavericks for Mark Aguirre.
  • The third quarter is eerily reminiscent of watching the Celtics defend Derrick Rose. The Pistons gear three guys at Jordan, who decides if they’re going to attack his jumper that hard, he’s just going to kill them with assists. He drives past the first defender, spins past the second and dishes to whoever is open or cutting. Grant, Sam Vincent, Sellers, everybody gets some.
  • Speaking of Sellers, one of the biggest busts winds up having a pretty decent game. He attacks the offensive glass, finishes where he needs to and doesn’t look completely lost. He also has zero defensive rebounds, but since the Pistons only wind up with 12 for 26% it’s not a nightmare.
  • Also nice side note. I see on Basketball-Reference that he’s listed as No.6. But in this game he’s wearing No.2. So I go back to find out what the deal is and I find this: Sellers blames his struggles as a Bull on wearing No.2… because it’s cursed. You can laugh at that all you want. Guess what number Eddy Curry wore for the Bulls?
  • James Edwards looks like he belongs on a Tyler Perry special.
  • Rick Mahorn’s ‘Stache should have its own business cards.
  • Basically in the third quarter, Rick Mahorn and Bill Cartwright have an episode that is bizarre to any modern NBA fan. Mahorn elbows Cartright in the chest on a box out (that’s a tech now), then Cartwright off and shoves Mahorn (that’s an ejection now), then Mahorn goes back at Cartwright (that’s another ejection), then Cartwright shoves him again (re-ejection?), then the Bulls hold Mahorn back. Try and imagine if Carlos Boozer and Ronnie Brewer held back Kevin Garnett from Joakim Noah and how that would go over. So basically, players in this era simultaneously disliked each other more than they do now, and yet treated each other with more respect and didn’t act as much like children.
  • Offensive rebounds aplenty for Chicago, mostly because they’re sending nine guys at Jordan (yes, nine).
  • Count me among those that remembered Rodman as having absolutely zero offense. Watch this game and you’ll feel differently.
  • The league average for 3PA per game this year was 18. In ’89, the Bulls averaged 6.5 per game, which was 13th in the league, and would be bottom three today. The Pistons attempted 4.9 per game, which was 18th in the league in ’89, and would be downright bizarre now. In this game? Both teams combined shot 14, with 8 of those coming from Chicago’s Craig Hodges. This was an overtime game.
  • You know those games where the veteran squad gets behind because the home team is playing with energy and exuberance, but the veteran squad just hangs around and hangs around? That. Lots of that.
  • Thomas has several buckets by slicing right, creating contact, double-clutching and going glass. Dwyane Wade stuff.
  • In the fourth, Jordan goes after the offensive glass, getting putbacks. How? I have no clue. He just does. One of those MJ things.
  • Dave Corzine is mesmerizing in this game. Not only for the hair, and for being Dave Corzine, but he blocks Laimbeer at the elbow at one point, starting a fast break.
  • Rodman does everything conceivable to try and keep Jordan in front of them, then tries to sell a pretty bad shoulder bump by Jordan on a baseline drive, again, no call, and Jordan slips left baseline for a righty layup. I will say that in modern NBA, that righty layup gets blocked into oblivion against the glass by whatever token athletic help defender the opponent has on the floor.
  • Here’s one for all you Knicks fans:
  • source:  Isiah pretty much starts going Derrick Rose again, relentlessly attacking the rim and going to the line every time as the game closes in on five minutes to go. Chicago’s got a sense of “how are we not up ten?”
  • There’s a segment with less than four minutes to go featuring Snapper Jones’ mother on a cooking show. That’s called “seizing the drama of the moment.”
  • Jordan did just miss some in this game. It’s like what would happen if that insane ability to hit everything he threw up abandoned him for a night. No wonder he hated Detroit so much.
  • Dennis Rodman hits a turnaround. Skip Caray says “If he learns to do that consistently, he’s going to be some player.” ROFL.
  • With 37 seconds left, Rodman finally gets the offensive foul call on Jordan barreling through the lane… and Jordan fouls out!
  • Jones says this is the first time Jordan’s fouled out this season. So Jordan goes out with less than forty seconds left with the Bulls down two.
  • Sellers fouls. Dantley… misses the first free throw? What the?
  • So nineteen seconds left, Bulls with the ball, down two. So obviously you work to get Jordan the… oh. Huh. I have no clue what Doug Collins is supposed to do here, but if this was 2011, the answer is obviously “lose, so they can get draft Jan Vesely.”
  • Well, that’s just insane. Pippen inbounds, it’s broken up, right back to Pippen, who drives, and throws up a runner and is fouled. Goes to the line, hits two with sixteen seconds left. Wow, that’s a confusing sequence for Detroit right there.
  • Vinnie Johnson posts up Pippen, gets the corner, gets to the rim… and just off the front lip. Drama! Overtime! Only on TBS!
  • If you need a laugh sometime, just watch Dennis Rodman and Bill Laimbeer run up the floor next to each other. “High knees, everyone! High knees!”
  • And the Piston who takes over is… Rodman? Rodman collects an offensive board and puts it back in. His eighth point since the third. And he’s getting offensive rebounds. No wonder Chicago wanted him so badly later. The Pistons are now hammering the Bulls on the glass with Sellers off the floor. Yes I’m serious.
  • Rodman comes weakside and blocks a buzzer-beater layup attempt from Hodges. Unbelievable play. And he didn’t do anything insane, or cocaine. Impressive.
  • Bill Cartwright cuts Isiah’s eye on a rebound, Laimbeer has to restrain him. Bill Cartwright vs. The Pistons!
  • Laimbeer, 18-footer. Dagger.
  • The Pistons grind them into oblivion and win, 104-98. They’ll go on to beat the Bulls in the ECF and win the title.

Luka Doncic, Donte DiVincenzo, Jerome Robinson among NBA draft invitees

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Of course DeAndre Ayton will attend Thursday’s NBA draft. The Suns will likely draft him No. 1 overall.

But what about more marginal first-round prospects?

The NBA’s draft invite list is an important tool in judging their stock. The league wants to avoid players sitting in agony until their names are called. So, the NBA works to invite only the prospects most likely to get picked high in the draft.

The full list of invited players (which the league notes is subject to change):

Luka Doncic will go high in the draft, and though how high is still uncertain, his inclusion on this list says nothing about his stock. It just speaks to whether we’ll see him Thursday night. His attendance will depend at least on when Real Madrid’s season ends, though the NBA is apparently confident enough to list him.

Jerome Robinson has climbed draft boards since the season ended. He must be impressing in workouts and interviews.

Donte DiVincenzo is a bit of a surprise selection, as he’s not widely viewed as a first-round lock. Perhaps, the league is looking to capitalize on his popularity stemming from a breakout NCAA tournament championship game.

This will only reinforce the idea Chandler Hutchinson received a promise. Otherwise, he’s a surprise invitee.

Among the top players not attending: Kevin Huerter (Maryland), Jacob Evans (Cincinnati), Troy Brown (Oregon) and Josh Okogie (Georgia Tech). Though they could go higher than players listed here, that says something about Huerter’s Evans’, Browns’ and Okogie’s stock, too.

Report: Rudy Gay opting out of Spurs contract

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Kawhi Leonard reportedly wants to leave the Spurs, but he’s at their whims.

This doesn’t mean Rudy Gay will depart San Antonio, but he’s taking control of his future.

Chris Haynes of ESPN:

Gay’s option-year salary was $8,826,300.

I doubt Gay, who turns 32 this summer, will draw such a high starting salary on his next contract – though I certainly wouldn’t rule it out. He could likely get a multi-year deal with a higher total value.

Or he could chase a ring elsewhere.

Remember, Gay gave up money to leave the Kings last summer. No matter how much the Leonard situation should make us rethink the Spurs’ culture, San Antonio probably isn’t “basketball hell.” Still, the Spurs clearly don’t look as appealing as they once did, and Gay has shown how much he values team quality.

Gay is coming off a nice season, and San Antonio might try to re-sign him. Danny Green has a $10 million player option for next season, which will swing whether the Spurs have the flexibility for a bigger move this summer.

Report: LeBron James’ camp likes Collin Sexton

AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast
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In 2014, LeBron James tweeted his fondness for Connecticut point guard Shabazz Napier. The Heat traded up to get Napier in the draft, but LeBron left for the Cavaliers that summer, anyway.

Could history repeat itself, this time in Cleveland?

LeBron has already talked up Oklahoma point guard Trae Young, but maybe LeBron and his camp want the Cavs to take a different point guard – Alabama’s Collin Sexton – with the No. 8 pick.

Joe Vardon of Cleveland.com, via Jordan Zirm of ESPN Cleveland:

The Cavaliers should take the best prospect available. Worrying about what LeBron might want makes a mistake only more likely.

LeBron might stay in Cleveland, but as 2014 showed, it won’t be because of a draft pick. If he stays, it very well could be by opting into the final year of his contract. His player-option salary ($35,607,968) is slightly higher than his projected max salary as a free agent (about $35.35 million). If LeBron opts in, the best chance of keeping him long-term is building a better team around him.

That means taking the best prospect at No. 8 or trading the pick for someone who can help LeBron win now. If the top prospect is Sexton, that’s fine. But the Cavs are fare more likely to appease LeBron by getting the pick right in the long run rather than choosing the prospect he wants now.

2018 NBA Draft Prospect Profiles: Is Trae Young a super star in the making?

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Trae Young is a perfect example of why, as an elite freshman entering the college ranks, it is so important to pick a school that is the right fit for you.

Young was a borderline five-star prospect entering the college ranks, the kind of point guard that was recruited by everyone from Kansas to Kentucky, but instead of picking one of the bluebloods, Young opted to stay home. He enrolled at Oklahoma, where his supporting case was questionable and he had the opportunity to have the entire offense run through him every single night.

And the results, at first, were sensational.

Young put up massive numbers, at one point averaging 30 points and 10 assists while leading Oklahoma into the top ten of the national rankings, getting himself compared to Steph Curry, talked about by LeBron and the focus of every college basketball broadcast for the first three months of the season.

Then, once Big 12 play started, opponents began to crack the code. Young didn’t have a ton of help on that roster, which, when combined with some of the issues that he has with shot selection and decision-making, turned him from a player with unimaginable efficiency on a never-before-seen level of usage into just another high-volume, low-efficiency gunner. Oklahoma’s season went in the toilet, the Sooners finished 18-14 on the year, losing 12 of their last 16 games and falling out of the Big 12 and NCAA tournaments in the first round.

That has turned Young into one of the more polarizing prospects in recent memory.

He became the first player in Division I history to lead the nation in scoring and assists, but he did it as a player that doesn’t like to play defense on a team that couldn’t figure out how to win late in the year.

Is he the second-coming of Steph Curry?

Or is he Jimmer Fredette?

And what GM is going to have the stones to find out?

HEIGHT: 6-foot-1.75
WEIGHT: 178 lbs
WINGSPAN: 6-foot-3
2017-18 STATS: 27.4 PPG, 8.7 APG, 3.6 RPG, 42.2/36.0/86.1, 5.2 TPG
DRAFT RANGE: 5-10

STRENGTHS

I would make the argument that Trae Young is the single-most skilled player in this year’s NBA draft. He might very well be the best shooter available, and I think that it is inarguable he is the best passer in this draft class. The biggest reason his counting stats are so high is because of the absurd level of volume and freedom that Lon Kruger afforded him, but there’s also a reason he was given that freedom.

Let’s start with his shooting. Young’s range extends will beyond the NBA’s three-point line, but what makes him so dangerous isn’t his ability as a catch-and-shoot threat, it’s how well he is able to get to his shot off of the dribble. Young’s handle is elite, as is his footwork. He’s always on balance and he has a lightening quick release, one that he doesn’t need much space to get off. He also has a variety of different step-backs and pull-backs to create space, and he’s a very good shooter off of hang-dribbles (if there’s a switch) or if a defender goes under a ball-screen.

Young is not the quickest or most explosive guard you’ll find, but he understands how to use his change of pace and some deceptive ball-handling to get a defense off balance and create room for himself to get into the paint. He has an array of shots that he can make in the paint, although he does need to continue to get more consistent with his floaters and mid-range shots.

Part of the reason that Kyrie Irving and Steph are able to thrive as two of the best scorers in the NBA is because they are elite finishers at and around the rim despite the fact that they are smaller and less athletic than the players that will be guarding them. Young will need to get to that level, and it’s certainly doable.

The other side of Young’s game is his ability to pass the ball. His vision is sensational, both in transition and in the halfcourt, and it will only get more effective in the NBA, where the players he is passing to are better and the wider deeper three-point are creates more space. The thing that really stood out to me in watching Young was his ability to read a defense in ball-screen actions. His basketball IQ and his understanding of where the defense is moving and who is going to be open is already at an elite level.

WEAKNESSES

The biggest concern with Young as a prospect is on the defensive side of the ball. Physically, he was not quite ready to defend at the collegiate level last season, let alone at the NBA level. He’s actually a little taller than you may realize — he’s just a shade under 6-foot-2 — but he weighs just 178 pounds with a willowy frame and a wingspan that is just 6-foot-3. He’s not all that strong, he’s not all that physical and he’s not all that tough, and that’s before you question if he has the quickness to guard elite NBA point guards.

And then there is the issue of whether or not he actually wants to play defense. He was a mess guarding ball-screens as a freshman, often showing little-to-no effort to fight through and getting lost when he did. He got beaten off the dribble without providing much in the way of resistance far too many times. He almost looked disinterested on that end of the floor. Context might be important here, however. With the load that Young was carrying on the offensive end, it’s certainly reasonable that he was either A) saving his legs to be able to carrying the Sooners offensively or B) didn’t actually have enough energy to defend.

That doesn’t diminish the concerns with his physical tools, but defending is about want-to, and it will be on the teams that are drafting to figure out whether or not he actually wants to defend. As flawed as Steph is defensively, he tries hard enough that he’s not that much of a liability.

The other issue is how careless and inefficient Young was late in the year. Not only did he lead the nation in scoring and assists, but he led in turnovers as well. He also has a bad habit of taking terrible shots early in the shot clock, settling for 25-footers with a defender in his face, but again, context is important to the discussion here.

The degree of difficulty on the plays that Young tried to make this season was often insanely high, but the truth is that Oklahoma really didn’t have any other options to create offense. Young had to carry the load for this group to be a tournament team, and it worked well enough for long enough that the Sooners were still a tournament team despite a disastrous finish to the season.

Again, NBA GMs are going to have to figure out the answer to this question: Was Young inefficient late in the year because that’s who he is as a player, or was he driving into three defenders or forcing 26-foot shots or trying to make tough passes because that’s what his team needed him to do?

NBA COMPARISON

The obvious comparison that gets made by everyone is Stephen Curry, and in a best-case scenario, I don’t think that’s terrible. That said, I think that, given Young’s ability to pass the ball, Steve Nash makes a little more sense — and that is who Young has idolized — but either way, you know about what his ceiling. I’m not sure he has two-time MVP upside, and comparing him to two players of that caliber is probably unfair, but he has the potential to be very, very good in a league built around ball-screens, the three-ball and pace-and-space.

That said, the floor for Young is very low. If he can’t figure out how to defend and he never ends up being good enough to have an offense built around him, I think there’s a real chance that his second contract is with a team outside of the NBA.

OUTLOOK

As the NBA moves more and more towards small-ball, the skill-set that Young has is going to continue to get more valuable. Elite shooting is something that every team in the league needs, and Young has that ability to shoot. He’s excellent in ball-screens as well, and his ability as a passer when the kind of spacing he’ll see on an NBA court is something that absolutely should translate.

We’ve been over the issues that he has with inefficiency, decision-making and defending. All of those are concerns, but I do think that the situation that Young was in at Oklahoma exacerbated them to a degree.

In my mind, Young’s career is going to be determined by whether or not he ends up being good enough that to have an offense built around him. The way he wants to play is as a James Harden or a Russell Westbrook. Even Steve Nash had the ball in his hands the majority of the time. Being a ball-dominant lead guard that gets run through 20-30 ball-screens a night is not something everyone can do.

And if Young can’t do that, I have a tough time envisioning what his role will be in the NBA.