Jimmer fever in Sacramento might help bring new arena

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Jimmer Fredette, the most talked about player in this year’s NBA draft, was selected No. 10 overall by the Sacramento Kings on Thursday.

30 minutes later, the Kings had a splash page with his likeness up ready to sell tickets on their website. Within another 30 minutes, Jimmer was trending worldwide on Twitter and was the 20th most searched term on all of Google.

By the time he arrived at the royal airport the next day, the Sacramento fans had gathered en masse to welcome him to his throne, conveniently forgetting the contention by many basketball types that he is a slow, white, geeky chump.

So as he descended down the airport escalator doing a poor man’s rendition of the Heatles’ introduction in Miami (not four times, not five times, not six times did he ride the escalator), even the most ardent Kings fan had to wonder if he is more Ringo than John.

None of this hullabaloo should be surprising, however, after Jimmer left college basketball with a formidable cult following, recognition from just about every corner of the basketball universe, and a music video to help explain how that all works (with a very white version, here).  And while he would have likely received significant attention wherever he landed, the honeymoon in Sacramento has been amplified due to the fans’ grassroots efforts to save their team.

As we’ve reported, the Here We Build coalition being quarterbacked by former Suns PG and current Mayor of Sacramento Kevin Johnson has brought together 70 regional leaders to try to deliver an arena, including heavy hitters from the world of money and politics to go with the Joe Lunchbuckets that refused to leave Power Balance Pavilion when everybody told them that their team was gone.

Without a new arena, the Kings will almost certainly pack up for Anaheim, who has rolled out the red carpet to become an NBA city.

And despite precise measurements available to anybody with an Internet connection showing how the public would benefit both economically and culturally by funding an Entertainment and Sports Complex (ESC) in Sacramento, the appetite to publicly fund sports arenas in California is decidedly bulimic. And because of that recent history, and the ease with which one can complain about any tax, politicians in the greater Sacramento region have balked at the very real threat of the Maloofs leaving Sacramento for over 10 years.

But this time around things are different, perhaps due to reality setting in when moving vans started circling Power Balance Pavilion. Or maybe it’s the 12.7% unemployment rate in Sacramento and the 4,000 jobs the proposed ESC will create, or the hundreds of millions of dollars the region would lose if the Kings leave and within just a handful of years – that word million graduates to the word billion.

The result is a creative set of funding proposals that will be considered over the coming months that will attempt to blend the perfect amount of public and private money to pay for the estimated $387 million price tag for a new ESC.

That’s right, public money. Now public money does not have to come through a direct sales tax. It can come from hotel fees, taxes on cigarettes, and just about anything a city or region would like – but it has to be approved (in this case) by a city council or regional authority that ultimately wants to get re-elected. Whereas prior arena funding efforts were largely unpopular, in conversations I’ve had with local politicians off the record, there is a palpable fear of the political fallout in future elections should they fail to deliver here.

As for the Maloofs, they liquidated nearly all of their ownership in the Palms Casino, eliminating $400 million of debt from the family’s balance sheet. For all intents and purposes they appear to be mobilizing to contribute to the private portion of the funding arrangement, though it’s unclear how much they’re able or willing to spend.

The question the Here We Build committee will seek to answer is what an operator would be willing to pay (and for what type of profits in return), what the Maloofs would be willing to pay as simple tenants (and what other profit-centers they would be willing to invest in), and then what funding the Sacramento region can get approved through its decision-making apparatus for the public piece – which naturally will happen when they compare the cost of their investment compared to the projected revenues and profits from audited reports.

And naturally, the investment will look better when the Kings are playing well, when they’re selling tickets and securing sponsorships, and when the Maloofs can kick in more money to the project with those higher projected revenues to lean back on.

Enter, the Jimmer.

Less than 24 hours after touching down on the tarmac, the Kings rolled Jimmer out with his two fellow draftees, Isaiah Thomas and Tyler Honeycutt, for a ‘Rookie Rally’ that begs the question of whether Justin Bieber grabbed Doc Brown’s DeLorean and kicked off his 80s mall tour. I’m only slightly sure that reports of grown men screaming and fainting were exaggerated by the press.

Despite the obvious marketing opportunity Jimmer brings to the table, the contention from Kings management is that he was drafted based purely on basketball ability, and whether the fans believe it or not — they don’t care.  It is a rare, if not unprecedented, example of a team’s fans and media knowingly and willingly taking the bait.

The fans in Sacramento know that his defense is an issue, they know the team’s defense is an issue, and they know that the team has at least five shooting guards and no true point guard. They know that the Kings could have addressed the gaping hole at small forward by drafting Kawhi Leonard, who is also known as the guy that the four-time NBA champion Spurs traded up-and-coming George Hill for.

They also know the move to trade Beno Udrih for John Salmons was made to accommodate Jimmer’s development, and while most of them believe that Salmons was not the right guy to bring in, only a muted few are screaming about not drafting Leonard.

When team president Geoff Petrie conveniently forgets the extra year on Salmons’ contract when he talks publicly about the trade leaving them in the same spot financially, nobody points out the $3-5 million per year that Leonard would have cost – compared to the 31-year old Salmons at about $8 million per year for three years (and a partially guaranteed fourth year at $7 million).

And no, the fact that the Kings may need five basketballs to be used during the game to keep everybody happy is not lost upon them. But while Kings fans recognize that there could be some chemistry issues, they’ll be quick to point out that Jimmer’s new teammates have all made statements that they’re excited to play with him.

Though Kings fans have watched their neighbors in Golden State crash and burn with it for years, they want to know what Don Nelson’s fun-and-gun offense would look like with Jimmer at the helm. After all, nobody in their right mind is expecting anything more than a No. 7 or 8 seed in the playoffs, so why not play a brand of basketball that’s exciting to watch.

And yes, they know that for every Steve Nash that there is an Adam Morrison, though if Morrison could have jumped like this then maybe he wouldn’t be out of the league.

Most importantly, Kings fans know that it doesn’t matter who the team drafts if they’re playing in Anaheim. And that’s where they’ll be if they don’t sell some tickets.

As for Jimmer-mania, the only thing that appears to have the ability to stop it would be the lockout.

Talking with vice president of tickets sales for the Kings, Phil Horn said “We are excited to welcome all of our rookies to the market,” adding, “As far as specific marketing initiatives, stay tuned.”

Horn could be playing coy because something big is coming down the pipeline or he could be in a holding pattern due to the lockout, and surely it should be a concern that any momentum for the arena effort get halted for any reason.

But judging by the estimated 5,000 people who showed up to see him at the mall, I’m guessing the Kings will have no problem marketing him with or without his presence on the team appearance circuit.

And whether or not he was a selected based solely on the merit of his play, it is inconsequential to Kings fans right now.

For them, Jimmer clearly gives them the best chance to win, and anything else that he can do on the basketball court right now is icing on the cake.

Philadelphia signs Corey Brewer to 10-day contract in effort to add depth

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The Philadelphia 76ers remain a step behind Toronto and Milwaukee — and maybe Boston — in the Eastern Conference, despite adding Jimmy Butler to form a “big three” with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons. One issue is getting those three to make sacrifices to their games and meld together. The second big issue is depth: J.J. Redick is their fourth best player, then things drop off a cliff.

Enter veteran Corey Brewer.

For at least 10 days, anyway.

The 76ers signed Brewer to a 10-day contract, the team announced Tuesday.

“For me, I love playing basketball. I just wanted another opportunity,” Brewer told NBC Sports Philadelphia. “I feel like I did enough last year that I should be on a team. But sometimes things don’t work out the right way … you can’t look it like that. An opportunity is an opportunity. I get to come here, and I gotta prove myself…

“I’m like a glue guy,” he said. “I do all the little stuff. I play hard, I’m going to run hard, and I feel like the way Ben [Simmons] pushes it, that’s right up my alley.”

Brewer is the king of the leak out and may benefit from some Simmons passes that way.

Brewer split time last season between the Lakers and Thunder, and in OKC he showed he could play a role on the right team and shot 34.3 percent from three. That fit was not evident on the young Lakers, Brewer looked out of place and struggled with his shot, which is likely why he was not able to land a guaranteed contract this past offseason.

This is a 10-day contract, the Sixers can sign him to two of those before having to either let him go or commit to him for the rest of the season. This is likely the first in a series of roster moves over the next few weeks as Elton Brand looks to find the right pieces to go around his big three stars so the team can make a push this offseason.

Warriors, Nuggets battle for first in West

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Playing in big games has become the norm for the Golden State Warriors.

Not so much for the Denver Nuggets.

Tuesday’s matchup between the top two teams in the Western Conference is new territory for Denver. Since the start of the 2013-14 season, the Nuggets have been rebuilding and retooling, not competing for titles, but they have arrived this year and are challenging to be the best team in the Western Conference.

The winner of Tuesday’s game in Denver will sit atop the conference standings. Denver (29-13) has been up there for a while now, but the Warriors (29-14) might yet find another gear in the second half of the season as they pursue a third consecutive NBA championship.

They are about to get a new, big piece when DeMarcus Cousins returns this week.

The center, who signed a one-year deal in the summer, tore his Achilles almost a year ago. His season debut is projected to come on Friday at the Los Angeles Clippers. Golden State is expecting it will take time for Cousins to get fully immersed and integrated into the offense.

“We’re excited, but it’s a little daunting, too,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said in the San Francisco Chronicle. “It’s not going to be simple just to plug him in. There’s going to be an adjustment period. He knows that, but it’s a fun challenge.”

The Nuggets have a big enough task stopping Golden State’s other stars. Guard Steph Curry, a two-time league MVP, hit 11 3-pointers in a 48-point effort to beat Dallas on Sunday, and then there’s Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green to worry about.

And the Warriors have a revenge factor to use. The Nuggets beat them 100-98 in Denver on Oct. 21 when Juancho Hernangomez blocked Damian Jones‘ layup at the buzzer.

The Nuggets have been playing at a high level lately, especially at home, where they are 18-3 and have won their last 12. The latest was a grind-it-out 116-113 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Sunday, which might have been a perfect tune-up for the Warriors.

Denver has its own star power in center Nikola Jokic and guard Jamal Murray. Jokic, averaging team-highs with 19.7 points and 10.2 rebounds per game, had consecutive triple-doubles last week and then clocked in with 40 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists against Portland.

With or without Cousins, Golden State will have a tough time handling the Serbian. But the Warriors are best when they force teams to adjust to them, and they come at teams from different angles. One night it could be Curry, the next Durant. When tuned in, Golden State is hard to beat.

The Nuggets are ready for the challenge after getting everyone’s best this season.

“As teams give us their best shot because we’re No. 1 in the West right now, everybody gives the Warriors their best shot,” said Murray, who is averaging 18.5 points. “We just know we have the home court, and we beat them last time here.”

PBT Podcast: Breaking down the MVP race, other NBA mid-season awards

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Patience is not the NBA community’s strong suit — we were talking MVP race the first week of the season.

Now, however, it’s time. Teams are more than halfway through the season and we have seen enough games, we have enough data to start discussing who is the frontrunners for all of the league’s end-of-season awards.

Is it James Harden or Giannis Antetokounmpo for MVP?

Can anyone challenge Luka Doncic for Rookie of the Year?

It’s a deep field for Coach of the Year, but is Mike Budenholzer the front-runner and can Doc Rivers, Dave Joerger or someone else catch him?

Kurt Helin and Dan Feldman of NBC Sports talk about their picks at this point of the season and who is in the running long term.

As always, you can check out the podcast below, listen and subscribe via iTunes at ApplePodcasts.com/PBTonNBC, subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

We want your questions for future podcasts, and your comments, so please email us at PBTpodcast@gmail.com.

Thunder coach Billy Donovan: Andre Roberson ‘not anywhere near playing’

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When Andre Roberson – who ruptured his patellar tendon last January then suffered a setback in October – suffered another setback in November, the Thunder said he’d miss at least six weeks.

That was more than six weeks ago.

Maddie Lee of The Oklahoman:

What a disappointing year for Roberson. He just can’t get healthy.

Even already possessing the NBA’s best defense, Roberson would help the Thunder. He’s a lockdown perimeter defender. Paul George has stepped up defensively, but a George-Roberson wing pairing would scare the daylights out of opposing offenses.

That said, Roberson is a tricky fit due to his dismal shooting. He’d disrupt Oklahoma City’s offensive spacing. The Thunder would need time to adjust, and if Roberson isn’t close to returning, there might not be time to establish chemistry before the playoffs.

George, Terrance Ferguson, Alex Abrines and Hamidou Diallo have been fine on the wing in Roberson’s absence. Continuing to rely on that group sans Roberson doesn’t maximize Oklahoma City’s production, but at least it’s a simple and workable solution.