Are the Mavericks the real villains in the NBA?

20 Comments

Hating the Heat is very trendy now. LeBron James going to Miami touched a nerve with fans and that has turned whomever they are playing into America’s team. Miami’s collection of talent just seems unfair to some, and players deciding to play together seems like cheating to them. The Heat are being blamed for ruining basketball, causing a run of players to big markets, high oil prices and drug- resistant bacteria.

But are the Mavericks really the bigger villain for the NBA? Specifically owner Mark Cuban’s freewheeling spending?

In a brilliant post, Tom Ziller over at SB Nation makes the case that Dallas’ flaunting of the salary cap and spending is a bigger problems than what happened in Miami.

Only one team has spent more money in the last decade than the Dallas Mavericks. Not the Lakers, not the Heat: only the New York Knicks, for a time led by an Isiah Thomas with a credit card and no conscience. The Mavericks have spent $851 million on payroll in the past decade, some $130 million more than the Lakers and $240 million more than the Heat….

The Mavericks work around the system by including draft picks in deals to get trades done … then buying back into the first round almost every single year, to the tune of $3 million a pop, cash that doesn’t count against the salary cap. Dallas works deals like the Peja Stojakovic buy-out/Alexis Ajinca trade this season. (What happened there? Oh, the Toronto Raptors decided to buy out Peja, taking a financial hit well in advance of the trade deadline. The Mavericks quickly signed him to a minimum contract. In a total and complete coincidence, the Mavs quickly traded prospect Alexis Ajinca to the Raptors with cash to cover his salary and a future second-round draft pick for the rights to a Greek dude who will probably never play in the NBA. The Mavs couldn’t legally trade for Peja without giving up a key player — a Stojakovic for Ajinca trade would have been illegal — so they borked the system set in place to limit salary, and did it through the back channels, claiming all the way that the deals were totally separate. Riiiight.)

You can make the argument that Cuban’s flaunting of the NBA’s soft cap and his spending is part of the reason for the coming lockout.

And the lockout will be far more villainous than the Heat.

(For the record, all those reasons Cuban may be bad for the NBA are exactly why I want him to buy my Los Angeles Dodgers.)