Baseline to Baseline recaps: Boston rolls over, Miami gets two seed

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Heat 98, Hawks 90: The Heat came out playing with real energy — they wanted to win this and take care of the second seed.

Miami got help early on because Atlanta just played lazy defense in the first half. Hawks players did not fight over screens, did not get back in transition, and the Heat are too good to just let have quality looks. The result was the Heat had 62 points on 63.4 percent shooting in the first half.

But it got close late thanks Miami shooting 33 percent in the fourth and Atlanta going on a 16-2 run sparked by the Hawks bench — Larry Drew ran with the subs the entire fourth quarter. Atlanta got a gift after a frustrated Big Z threw the ball off Zaza Pachulia’s back and got ejected — Atlanta’s technical free throw tied it at 88 with less than three on the clock. But then Hawks fouled James Jones on a three to make it a four-point play. On their next possession the Hawks looked lost and got a 24 second violation. Then another Jones three and Miami was up 7 with 2:30 left the Heat basically had it wrapped up.

Miami now gets Philadelphia in the first round.

Wizard 95, Boston 94 (OT): Boston chose rest over pushing to see if they could get the two seed — the big four all sat. That meant a sloppy game where the winning team shot 40 percent. It also showed us that Boston’s bench is basically as good as the Wizards’ starters. Jordan Crawford hit the game-tying shot at the end of regulation, John Wall had 24 points and got to the line 15 times.

Boston gets New York in the first round.

Mavericks 98, Rockets 91 (OT): Dallas sleepwalked through three quarters of this than woke up in the fourth, made some nice runs and forced overtime (they might not have needed that if Jason Terry had not missed some free throws to win the game). That the Mavs needed overtime against a Houston team without Luis Scola and Kyle Lowry shows you how seriously they seemed to take most of the game.

Magic 95, Sixers 85: No Lou Williams or Andre Iguodala for Philly, and they had no way to stop the Magic inside. Orlando only shot 43.8 percent on the night but they were grabbed 19 offensive rebounds — Ryan Anderson had seven by himself. The Magic grabbed the offensive rebound on 45 percent of their missed shots, and that was the difference.

Bobcats 105, Nets 103: With the game on the line late D.J. Augustin was patient, came off a Boris Diaw pick and hit the fade-away jumper with 1.1 seconds left to seal the Bobcats win. Diaw, by the way, had 18 second half points. Not much defense played in this one but the ending was entertaining.

Cavaliers 110, Pistons 101: CLEVELAND IS NOT THE WORST! Neither team seemed to care in this one, Daniel Gibson sparked a 12-1 run at the end of the third and the result was a Cavs win. That win moved them out of having the worst record in the NBA. Congratulations Timberwolves, wear that crown with pride.

Jazz 90, Hornets 78: Utah started hot, shooting 60 percent for the first 18 minutes, including C.J. Miles taking charge early with 10 first quarter points. Utah never really backed off and won handily. New Orleans is playing poorly heading into the playoffs.

Bucks 93, Raptors 86: Stat of the night from Raptors Republic: Of the nine Raptors that played against the Bucks, only one played on opening night – DeMar DeRozan. Toronto led most of the way but a 15- fourth-quarter run sparked by Drew Gooden got the Bucks the win.

Nuggets 134, Warriors 111: Very fast pace — 102 possessions — suited Denver well as nine Nuggets scored in double digits and they shot 53.2 percent as a team. J.R. Smith had 22, Kosta Koufos had 18 points on 8 shots. This gave Denver win number 50 on the season.

Suns 135, Timberwolves 127 (OT): For a meaningless game both teams really brought some effort to this one. Not defense, nobody brought that. But there was effort. Channing Frye had 33 points and was 9-of-14 from three. The Suns went on an 8-0 run in overtime to earn the win.

Thunder 120, Kings 112: Credit the Thunder for winning what could have been a trap game after beating the Lakers Sunday. The Thunder shot 57 percent, Kevin Durant had 32 points on 16 shots and Serge Ibaka had some big blocks that sparked the Thunder win.

DeMarcus Cousins looking for NBA return, ‘I just want a fair shot’

2022 NBA Playoffs - Denver Nuggets v Golden State Warriors
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DeMarcus Cousins can still help a team. He did it last season, first in Milwaukee because they needed depth (Brook Lopez was out following back surgery) and he gave them 9.1 points and 5.8 rebounds a game of solid play. Then, the Bucks let him go for financial reasons and the Nuggets picked him up to play behind Nikola Jokic and he was again a solid reserve, with 8.9 points and 5.5 rebounds a game (and he had a 31-point night against the Rockets).

Cousins, however, has not landed with a team heading into this season, with teams more concerned about his character and influence than his game. Cousins told Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports he has learned from his past mistakes and wants another chance.

“Have I made mistakes? Absolutely,” Cousins told Yahoo Sports. “Have I done things the wrong way? Absolutely. For that, I’m very apologetic. But I’ve done even more things the correct way and I’ve done even more positive things compared to my negatives. I just don’t want those positives to be overlooked. And obviously, whenever it gets to the point where the negatives outweigh the positives, you should probably move away from him. That’s just how life goes. But I don’t believe I’m in that boat. I’m just asking for a chance to show my growth as a man and a player…

“I think the misperception of me is that I’m this angry monster that just goes around bullying people, beating people up, uncoachable, and a cancer in the locker room,” Cousins told Yahoo Sports. “I think it’s all false. I played for coach [John] Calipari, a legendary coach. I was more than coachable. Steve Kerr would attest to that and coach Malone. Obviously, you can always go back to my time in Sacramento. I was a young kid. I was still figuring this business out. I was ignorant to a lot of things. I handled a lot of things the incorrect way, but I’ve also learned from those mistakes…

“So, to hold my time in Sac over my head, I think that’s unfair. I believe we all should have a chance to grow and change and actually have that change be embraced. I just want a fair shot.”

Cousins also said he is working out daily to be ready when the phone rings and understands he is now a role player.

It will ring. At some point an injury will happen and a team will turn to Cousins to be that solid backup big they can give 15 minutes a night (or, a team will realize they need more size than they currently have on their roster). Center has become a bit of a mercenary position in the NBA, one where teams often look to fill roles on the cheap so money can be spent on perimeter players, and teams think low-risk with those spots. Fair or not, Cousins is not seen as low risk.

But his stint with the Warriors before the bubble (and before he tore his ACL) and last season with the Bucks and Nuggets show he can fit in on an established team and contribute. Eventually, he should get that chance.

Report: Draymond Green facing potential discipline after fight with Jordan Poole

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Warriors practice got heated on Wednesday and Draymond Green reportedly escalated some chest bumping with Jordan Poole and punches were thrown. The team is now considering internal disciple, according to The Athletic.

When a heated interaction with guard Jordan Poole escalated, Green forcefully struck Poole and needed to be separated swiftly, sources said. Green and Poole came chest-to-chest, with both players pushing and shoving each other prior to Green’s escalation of the physical altercation, those sources said.

The two players had been jawing at each other when it escalated and Green punched Poole, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN. There aren’t details of the incident beyond that description (at least so far), although several reporters have confirmed the was a fight and the two had to be broken up. Poole was seen getting up shots after practice when the media was allowed in and reportedly was joking with teammates.

Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports Tweeted out what feels like the Draymond Green camp spin on the incident.

Warriors elder statesman Andre Iguodala Tweeted out this on the situation, wanting to keep it all in the family, and adding that “it broke my heart… but it fixed my vision.”

There is a history of tension between Green and Poole, including a public flare-up between the duo early last season, but the two talked after and smoothed things over. At least for a while.

What punishment Green will face from the team remains to be seen.

Poole is on the verge of an extension to his rookie contract, one where Tylyer Herro just set the market.

Green had hoped for an extension from the Warriors this offseason but there were limited discussions between the parties. Green can opt out of the final year of his contract at the end of this season and become a free agent.

Wizards’ Kispert likely to miss start of season due to sprained ankle

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The Washington Wizards made fewer 3-pointers than any other team in the league last season. They didn’t take a lot (second fewest) and didn’t make the ones they took (fifth lowest percentage). One goal for Wes Unlseld Jr. this season was to change that dynamic, and second-year player Corey Kispert was a big part of that plan.

Now Kispert is out through at least the start of the season, sidelined 4-6 weeks by a sprained ankle, the team announced Wednesday.

The injury happened on a fluke play in Japan against the Warriors, but Kispert shouldn’t miss much time once the real games start. The Wizards are a little short on the wing right now with Kispert joining Deni Avdija (groin injury) in the training room.

Kispert took 62% of his shots from beyond the arc last season and hit 35% of them, both solid numbers but ones Wizards hoped would improve for the 6’6″ wing this season.

Scoot Henderson says he has skills to be No.1 pick but not hung up on it

Metropolitans 92 v G League Ignite
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Scoot Henderson came out like a man on a mission Tuesday night against the Metropolitans 92 and Victor Wembanyama — he was in attack mode. He used his explosive athleticism to get to the rim, his impressive body control to get off good shots, and his strength to finish with authority. And if the defender played back, he would drain the jumper over him.

A year ago, Jaylen Brown called him the best 17-year-old he’d ever seen. Scoot is better than that now.

Many years, Henderson would be a clear No.1 overall pick. But, not this year, Wembanyama has that crown because he breaks the mold with his size and skill set (in the NBA, height still wins out).

Kevin O’Conner of The Ringer asked Henderson why he should be the top prospect and got a confident answer.

There will be a lot of people making the Henderson case this season — and with good reason. He could be a franchise cornerstone player for the next decade.

Henderson, however, is trying not to get hung up on No.1 vs. No.2.

There’s a long list of legendary players selected No.2: Bill Russell, Kevin Durant, Jerry West, Jason Kidd, and that is just the tip of the iceberg. Henderson can be one of them.

Unless Wembanyama’s medicals come back with red flags, he is destined to be the No.1 pick next June. That, however, will not be the end of Henderson’s story. Instead, it will be just the beginning.