Winderman: It’s time for an NBA Hall of Fame

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OK, exhale. No, not from the disappointment that was the NCAA men’s championship game (Butler apparently couldn’t hit the exit on its way home, either), but rather from the Basketball Hall of Fame announcements.

Teresa Edwards, Goose Tatum and Herb Magee but no Reggie Miller, who didn’t even make it to the final round of balloting?

OK, enough already. Why isn’t there an NBA Hall of Fame?

There’s a Pro Football Hall of Fame that essentially is the NFL’s shrine.

There’s a Baseball Hall of Fame that is almost exclusively Major League Baseball.

But the NBA continues to share quarters with anyone who has achieved enduring success by tossing small ball through large hoop.

Here’s the issue:

There is a Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Tenn. It bills itself as “the only facility of its kind dedicated to all levels of women’s basketball.”

There is a College Basketball Hall of Fame in Kansas City. It boasts, “You will immediately recognize that greatness lives here.”

There’s a FIBA Hall of Fame for international players in Alcobendas, Spain, “to preserve the heritage of international basketball.”

But Google “NBA Hall of Fame” and you wind right back in Springfield, Mass., at the Naismith Hall.

There you can find Sergei A. Belov, Carol A. Blazejowski, Kresimir Cosic, Joan Crawford (seriously), Drazen Dalipagic, Forrest S. DeBernardi, Anne T. Donovan, Paul Endacott, and, well that just gets us through the “E” portion of the inducted-players list.

There is no doubt that basketball success comes at all levels, all nationalities and genders.

But for an entity such as the NBA that so tries to distinguish itself among the major sports leagues, there’s something about following Goose Tatum on the podium, even if the next inductee is Dennis Rodman. Ditto for when Pat Riley had to sit through Dick Vitale’s history of his dipsy-doo dunk-a-roo life (Baby!).

No, the NBA is a large enough global brand to have it own hall of fame.

So let’s get this straight: Vince McMahon has his own (WWE) Hall of Fame and David Stern doesn’t?

No, don’t desert the Naismith Hall, but appreciate that NBA basketball is like no other brand of the game and deserves to be branded as such.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat.

Bucks to wear ‘Cream City’ jerseys (photos)

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The Bucks making cream one of their colors? Great! It was distinctive and local, celebrating the cream-colored bricks throughout Milwaukee.

These uniforms?

Bucks:

Not so great. Everything about the uniforms is fine except the words on the front of the jersey.

I’m sure nobody will crack immature jokes about those.

Reporter: Charles Barkley told me, ‘I don’t hit women, but if I did, I would hit you’

Lisa Lake/Getty Images for Julius Erving Golf Classic (a PGD Global Production)
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Charles Barkley has a history of sexist comments.

The crudest publicly came in 1990. Los Angeles Times:

Barkley, who said the remarks were meant as a joke, was quoted as saying after a tough Nov. 3 win over the underdog New Jersey Nets that “this is a game that if you lose, you go home and beat your wife and kids. Did you see my wife jumping up and down at the end of the game? That’s because she knew I wasn’t going to beat her.”

But since becoming beloved for his outspokenness as a commentator, there have been others – calling the Warriors’ style “little-girly basketball,” mocking the weight of female Spurs fans.

Now, Barkley has again run his mouth in this direction.

Alexi McCammond of Axios:

Turner Sports:

This was obviously inappropriate for Barkley to say. I’m not sure how else to characterize it. It doesn’t sound like a threat. It’s not related to domestic violence. It’s just not the way to speak to someone working professionally.

I’m glad he apologized, and I hope he learned from this. But history suggests he’ll continue to make off-color jokes. In fact, he’s rewarded for repeatedly pushing the line.

That might eventually get him into serious trouble. I don’t think these remarks should be the ones to spark mass outrage.

Derrick Rose: If load management existed back then, I’d probably still be with Bulls

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In 2011, Derrick Rose won MVP.

In 2012, Rose tore his ACL.

After playing big minutes early in his career, Rose was frequently sidelined the next few seasons. That took a toll on everyone involved. He felt the loneliness and despair of major injuries. The Bulls struggled to meet expectations with their best and highest-paid player repeatedly injured.

Eventually, Chicago traded Rose to the Knicks.

NBC Sports Chicago:

Rose:

It was just a different time in the sports world, period. Now we have the term “load management.” I don’t think that I would’ve taken it as far as Kawhi, as far as like they’re really being cautious about his injury or whatever he has. But if load management would’ve been around, who knows? I probably would’ve still been a Chicago Bull by now. But it wasn’t around.

Load management was around. That term hadn’t become popularized. But teams – most notably Gregg Popovich’s Spurs – had already begun resting players throughout the season.

Then-Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau just didn’t subscribe to that thinking. He wanted his best players on the court as often as possible. He had them practice long and hard to build good habits.

The science has evolved since then, but Thibodeau continued in his old-school with the Timberwolves. He just appeared stuck in his ways.

We’ll never know what would’ve happened if Chicago were more cautious with Rose. Maybe his on-court impact would’ve been lessened without all those reps. Maybe he would’ve gotten hurt, anyway.

But in this “what if?”, more focus should be on his coach than the era.

LeBron James becomes first player with triple-double against all 30 teams

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LOS ANGELES — Jason Kidd used to hold the record, he got to 28 during his Hall of Fame playing career.

Kidd, now a Lakers’ assistant coach, was the first to congratulate LeBron James after Tuesday night’s Los Angeles win over Oklahoma City.

Well, first Kidd told LeBron he played a bad game.

“I had seven turnovers, I was bad,” LeBron said. “I agreed with him.”

Then Kidd let James he had just made history: With his 25 points, 11 rebounds, and 10 assists, LeBron got his first triple-double against the Thunder — making LeBron the first player in NBA history to have a triple-double against every team.

“I don’t know, I really don’t know what to think about it,” LeBron said. “I’ve had some great teammates and coaches who put me in a position to facilitate… and hopefully, though all those triple-doubles, I’ve got a winning record in those games.”

LeBron’s combination of versatility and longevity are unmatched in league history. However, reaching this milestone it also required him to move around a little — he had to switch teams to get a triple-double against the Cavaliers, Heat, and Lakers.

“He’ll say it’s because he’s been in the league so long,” Lakers coach Frank Vogel said, guessing wrong but still making his point. “But we all know it’s because he’s remarkable, and for him to be doing it as long as he’s been doing it, that’s how you knock out all 30… I don’t know if that will ever get accomplished again.”

Vogel talked about the growth in LeBron’s game. When Vogel was coaching in Indiana, the book on LeBron was to play back and force him to shoot over the top of the defense. Now “he’s the best deep shooter on our team,” Vogel said.

LeBron has always scored almost at will and been active on the glass. It’s his assist numbers that have jumped to a career-high season because he has been asked to play more of a point guard role. LeBron leads the league with 11.1 assists per game (Luka Doncic is second at 9.3).

However, with the recent return of the one pure point guard on the roster in Rajon Rondo, it was fair to wonder if that would that cut into LeBron’s opportunities to rack up dimes? So far, no. Plus, LeBron is finishing a few assists for Rondo, too.

With the win 112-107 win against a scrappy Thunder team, the Lakers improve to a league-best 12-2 on the season.