Derrick Rose’s season inspires John Wall

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Each year Derrick Rose has stepped on the court, he has gotten better.

Each of his three seasons he has taken on more and more of the Chicago offense but his true shooting percentage has gone up each year (that’s his points per shot attempt, counting threes and fouls), his assist percentages have gone up, each year his three-point shooting has improved.

John Wall has had a good rookie season in Washington. But he looks at what Rose has done in the past three seasons, how he has improved, and it is inspiring, Wall told Chris Tomasson with Hoopshype

“My goal is to get to his level and get better,’’ Wall said in an interview with HoopsHype about wanting to improve his game similar to the way Rose has. “It took time for him to progress. That’s something I’m trying to do.

“I know a lot of teams are giving (open shots) to me. In some games, I’m hot and I’m making it. In some games, I make one out of four. But I think if I’m making it more consistently, it’s going to be tougher for guys to guard me. That’s something Derrick really did, and now it’s tougher for teams to stop him.’’

Wall may have farther to go than Rose did. This season Wall has hit 25 percent of his shots from 10-15 feet out (1.4 attempts per game), 29 percent from 16 feet out to the arc (4.3 per game) and 30.7 on threes (1.7 per game). All stats via Hoopdata.

Rose his rookie season? He shot 38 percent from 10 to 15 (1.6 per game), 43 percent from 16-23 (4.9 per game) and 22.2 percent from three (0.9 per game).

What Rose has really done is both improve his three point shooting (up to 34 percent this season, so you have to respect the shot and defend it) and become better at picking his spots in the midrange. He’s only hitting 38 percent of his 16-23 footers this season, he’s just taking fewer of them. Instead of taking long twos he’s stepping back and taking those as threes and hitting them. That’s part of what makes Rose improved — it’s not hitting more midrange shots, it’s drawing you out to cover his threes then he blows by you.

That is the lesson for Wall. He does need a better midrange game, but what he really needs is to be pulling guys out to the arc to cover him, not laying off him and daring him to shoot. Wall said he plans to work on his shot this offseason.

“I try to shoot a thousand a day,’’ Wall, averaging 16.3 points and 8.6 assists and shooting 40.5 percent overall, said of his offseason regiment. “But I want to do it more where I’m really jumping. (Last) summer, I wasn’t really jumping on my jump shot. Just shooting a set shot. You can’t do that in this league. Guys are fast and they’re closing out. So you’re going to see me work and I’m going to come back with an improved jumper next year.’’

One other thing: Rose got much better teammates in the past three years, something that makes any player look improved. Wall could use some of those, too.