Aaron Brooks not yet a fit for the Suns

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The Suns and the Rockets are two teams on the outside looking in at the playoff picture in the Western Conference, but each is on the rise. Houston had won seven of eight, and Phoenix had won five of seven coming into Tuesday night’s head-to-head matchup. The game’s result, an exciting 113-110 home win for the Suns, may very well end up having a direct impact on the teams’ playoff chances as we head into the final five weeks of the season.

But in this meeting, there was something else at stake between the two clubs, however trivial at this point: bragging rights over who may have gotten the better end of the deadline-day deal that saw Goran Dragic and a protected 2011 first round draft pick head to Houston in exchange for Aaron Brooks.

While neither had a material impact on this particular contest, you have to believe that — at this early stage — the Rockets are a bit happier on their end than the Suns.

Dragic and Brooks combined to go 0 for 10 from the field in this one, but the difference in the on-court presence and demeanor between the two was more than noticeable — it was obvious.

Dragic played with aggression and purpose, darting to his spots on the floor, pressing up on defense, and zipping passes to his new teammates with precision. Brooks, meanwhile, over-dribbled aimlessly on offense, forced passes into traffic which resulted in turnovers, and didn’t appear to know where or when the cuts from his teammates would be coming from just yet.

Simply put, Brooks looked largely lost out there in his limited minutes on the floor. Along with the lack of familiarity with his new surroundings, it’s possible that nerves may have played a part in Brooks’ particularly poor performance.

“Jittery, nervous,” Brooks said, when asked to describe his feelings taking the floor in his home debut with his new team. “It was one of my worst games but I’m happy, thrilled we got the win — that’s most important. The game was so valuable, and we got it done.”

Brooks hasn’t been disastrous until this outing, and has shot the ball well in his first five games with Phoenix, making 16 of his 29 attempts. But some of those buckets came when the games had already been decided, and he’s nowhere near a fit yet for this team, which Suns coach Alvin Gentry said is something that he expects to take some time.

“I think he’s still learning,” Gentry said. “I think he’s a little bit too unselfish right now, because we need for him to be a scorer. At this stage I think he just feels like he needs to try to fit in first. I don’t think he understands the makeup of this team, where it’s such an unselfish team — they don’t really care. If he comes in and has 20 good shots and he takes them, no one’s going to say anything. But I think just like (former Sun Jason Richardson) had to, and just like (Channing Frye) had to, I think it takes time to understand that — the culture of this team, and the unselfishness of this team.”

Brooks admitted afterward that might have something to do with him taking longer than expected to adjust.

“Coming (to the team) in the middle of the season, you don’t really want to step on anybody’s toes,” Brooks said. “You know, it’s the beginning, and I’m not really concerned about that, honestly. I mean, I can play basketball, it’s just about getting out there, feeling comfortable, and doing my thing. I’m not worried too much about it.”

As Brooks mentioned, the win was a valuable one because it assures the Suns, who now sit just a game and a half out of the eighth playoff spot behind the Memphis Grizzlies, a clinching of the season series over the Rockets, having won the first two contests with just one meeting remaining.

A career high of 32 points from Hakim Warrick to go along with another 32 from Vince Carter powered the Suns on this night, and Brooks’ contributions as a reserve weren’t needed in order for Phoenix to secure the victory. Despite his rough outing, that’s something Brooks obviously sees as a positive.

“Maybe I was a little reluctant today,” Brooks said. “But I figure if I played my worst today and we still got the win, it can only go up from there.”

The Suns are hoping the same.

Paul Allen, long-time owner of Portland Trail Blazers, dies after battle with cancer

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This is a painful loss, not just for the Portland Trail Blazers, but for the NBA.

Paul Allen, who made his money as one of the founders of Microsoft and went on to start Vulcan enterprises, which owns the Trail Blazers as well as the NFL’s Seattle Seahawks, has passed away from his battle with cancer. He was just 65 years old.

“Paul Allen was the ultimate trail blazer – in business, philanthropy and in sports,” NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said. “As one of the longest-tenured owners in the NBA, Paul brought a sense of discovery and vision to every league matter large and small.  He was generous with his time on committee work, and his expertise helped lay the foundation for the league’s growth internationally and our embrace of new technologies.  He was a valued voice who challenged assumptions and conventional wisdom and one we will deeply miss as we start a new season without him.  Our condolences go to his family, friends and the entire Trail Blazers organization.”

Just a couple of weeks ago, Allen had announced his non-Hodgkins lymphoma had returned. It was his third round with the disease, but it was not known that it was already at a life-threatening stage.

After his first battle with the disease, Allen left Microsoft to pursue other interests, which included philanthropy and owning the Trail Blazers and Seahawks. Allen bought the Trail Blazers in 1988 for $70 million from real estate developer Larry Weinberg. Forbes currently estimates the value of the franchise at $1.3 billion.

It is possible this will lead to a sale of the Trail Blazers in not too distant future.

(Do not think this means another owner can swoop in like a vulture and move the team. Aside the fact Commissioner Adam Silver and the league would push back against moving a healthy franchise, the Blazers’ lease at the Moda runs through 2025, with explicit language to keep the team in Portland through 2023 at least.)

Allen’s sister, Ms. Jody Allen, released the following statement:

“Paul’s family and friends were blessed to experience his wit, warmth, his generosity and deep concern. For all the demands on his schedule, there was always time for family and friends. At this time of loss and grief for us – and so many others – we are profoundly grateful for the care and concern he demonstrated every day.”

Our thoughts and condolences go out to Allen’s family and friends.

Larry Nance Jr., Cavaliers reportedly agree to four-year, $45 million contract extension

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Cleveland wanted this to happen, he’s the son of a Cavaliers’ legend who showed last playoffs he can have a role in whatever is next for this team post-LeBron.

Larry Nance Jr. wanted this to happen — he was born in Akron and was raised in the area, Cleveland is where he wants to be.

So as had been expected, the Cavaliers and Nance were able to work out an extension to his rookie contract before the deadline, as reported by Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports.

Joe Varden of the Athletic said the final numbers were four-years, $44.8 million.

That seems about a fair price. Nance was a steal in the draft by the Lakers 27th back in 2015 and was a fan favorite in L.A., but was sent to Cleveland in the Isaiah Thomas trade. Nance is a quality rotation player on both ends, a guy who averaged 8.7 points per game last season (expect that to go up) and shot 58.1 percent overall (and a 58.5 true shooting percentage, above the league average). He had a PER of 21.5 while with the Cavaliers last season (and a 20.2 PER with a 68.5 true shooting percentage in a smaller playoff role), showing the kind of versatility prized in today’s NBA.

This contract is a win for both sides.

Jodie Meeks set to dodge nearly $600K in suspension penalty with trade from Wizards to Bucks

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Jodie Meeks was set to forfeit $596,686 this season due to his performance-enhancing-drug suspension.

Instead, he could receive his his entire $3,454,500 salary.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

The Wizards are in line to save $6,146,794 in luxury tax with this move. Subtract the amount paid to the Bucks, which surely includes at least Meeks’ full salary. But that’s still at least $ 2,692,294 in savings, which is why Washington also sent a draft pick.

Milwaukee was in the right place at the right time – with the Greg Monroe trade exception (from the Eric Bledsoe deal) just large enough to absorb Meeks – to extract an extra draft pick.

But the big winner is Meeks, who can’t serve a suspension while not on a roster and therefore can’t have his pay docked. If he signs again in the NBA, he’d still have to sit 19 games, but his lost salary would almost certainly be based on a minimum salary, not the higher amount he’s due this year.

Report: Pacers, Myles Turner agree to four-year, $80 million extension

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Update: There’s the not unexpected wrinkle:

 

The Pacers’ identification and development of young players stagnated in the Paul George era and might have contributed to his exit. Indiana’s kept first-round picks in the seven years between drafting and trading George: Miles Plumlee, Solomon Hill, Myles Turner, T.J. Leaf.

Turner is the lone hope to emerge as a secondary star, and though now it’d be next Victor Oladipo rather than George, the Pacers will pay Turner as such.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

That’s a sizable deal, not just in terms of dollars but also opportunity cost. This will unnecessarily cut into Indiana’s cap space next summer.

Turner will begin the offseason counting against the cap at his 2019-20 salary, which based on the reported terms, will be between $17,857,143 and $22,727,273. If the Pacers didn’t extend him and let him become a restricted free agent, they could have held him at $10,230,852, used their other cap space first then exceeded the cap to re-sign him with Bird Rights.

So, why lock him up now? Indiana clearly believes his production will outpace his salary. This prevents another team from signing him to an even larger offer sheet next summer.

The 22-year-old Turner can live up to this deal. He’s a good 3-point shooter and shot-blocker. He must play with more force inside and either improve his foot speed or defensive recognition, ideally both. But he has plenty of tools for a modern center.

That said, if the extension is fully guaranteed, this is too much of a gamble on Turner for me. For sacrificing so much cap flexibility next summer, the Pacers should have gotten more of a discount. Of course, if this deal is heavy on incentives and short on guarantees, that could swing the analysis.