Aaron Brooks not yet a fit for the Suns

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The Suns and the Rockets are two teams on the outside looking in at the playoff picture in the Western Conference, but each is on the rise. Houston had won seven of eight, and Phoenix had won five of seven coming into Tuesday night’s head-to-head matchup. The game’s result, an exciting 113-110 home win for the Suns, may very well end up having a direct impact on the teams’ playoff chances as we head into the final five weeks of the season.

But in this meeting, there was something else at stake between the two clubs, however trivial at this point: bragging rights over who may have gotten the better end of the deadline-day deal that saw Goran Dragic and a protected 2011 first round draft pick head to Houston in exchange for Aaron Brooks.

While neither had a material impact on this particular contest, you have to believe that — at this early stage — the Rockets are a bit happier on their end than the Suns.

Dragic and Brooks combined to go 0 for 10 from the field in this one, but the difference in the on-court presence and demeanor between the two was more than noticeable — it was obvious.

Dragic played with aggression and purpose, darting to his spots on the floor, pressing up on defense, and zipping passes to his new teammates with precision. Brooks, meanwhile, over-dribbled aimlessly on offense, forced passes into traffic which resulted in turnovers, and didn’t appear to know where or when the cuts from his teammates would be coming from just yet.

Simply put, Brooks looked largely lost out there in his limited minutes on the floor. Along with the lack of familiarity with his new surroundings, it’s possible that nerves may have played a part in Brooks’ particularly poor performance.

“Jittery, nervous,” Brooks said, when asked to describe his feelings taking the floor in his home debut with his new team. “It was one of my worst games but I’m happy, thrilled we got the win — that’s most important. The game was so valuable, and we got it done.”

Brooks hasn’t been disastrous until this outing, and has shot the ball well in his first five games with Phoenix, making 16 of his 29 attempts. But some of those buckets came when the games had already been decided, and he’s nowhere near a fit yet for this team, which Suns coach Alvin Gentry said is something that he expects to take some time.

“I think he’s still learning,” Gentry said. “I think he’s a little bit too unselfish right now, because we need for him to be a scorer. At this stage I think he just feels like he needs to try to fit in first. I don’t think he understands the makeup of this team, where it’s such an unselfish team — they don’t really care. If he comes in and has 20 good shots and he takes them, no one’s going to say anything. But I think just like (former Sun Jason Richardson) had to, and just like (Channing Frye) had to, I think it takes time to understand that — the culture of this team, and the unselfishness of this team.”

Brooks admitted afterward that might have something to do with him taking longer than expected to adjust.

“Coming (to the team) in the middle of the season, you don’t really want to step on anybody’s toes,” Brooks said. “You know, it’s the beginning, and I’m not really concerned about that, honestly. I mean, I can play basketball, it’s just about getting out there, feeling comfortable, and doing my thing. I’m not worried too much about it.”

As Brooks mentioned, the win was a valuable one because it assures the Suns, who now sit just a game and a half out of the eighth playoff spot behind the Memphis Grizzlies, a clinching of the season series over the Rockets, having won the first two contests with just one meeting remaining.

A career high of 32 points from Hakim Warrick to go along with another 32 from Vince Carter powered the Suns on this night, and Brooks’ contributions as a reserve weren’t needed in order for Phoenix to secure the victory. Despite his rough outing, that’s something Brooks obviously sees as a positive.

“Maybe I was a little reluctant today,” Brooks said. “But I figure if I played my worst today and we still got the win, it can only go up from there.”

The Suns are hoping the same.

Joel Embiid: Aron Baynes (‘Man bun’) ‘in NBA just to get dunked on’

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During the second round of the NBA playoffs, Heat guard Goran Dragic slighted 76ers rookie Ben Simmons. That came after Philadelphia eliminated Miami in the first round.

The procession of disses continues with 76ers center Joel Embiid mocking Celtics center Aron Baynes during Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals Monday. Boston, of course, eliminated Philadelphia in the previous round.

Embiid:

Baynes has gotten dunked on a lot this year – including by Embiid in the playoffs. The two also got into it during their second-round series.

But Baynes has the big edge: He’s still playing.

Though Embiid would like to be in the playoffs, that’s not his only goal. He also wants attention. So, mission accomplished, I guess.

Watch James Harden demolish Draymond Green with dunk (video)

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It got buried by a – finallyclose finish, but James Harden‘s dunk over Draymond Green in the Rockets’ Game 4 win over the Warriors last night was spectacular.

Because the foul was called early in the play, Green essentially had free reign to do anything sub-flagrant to Harden during continuation. There wouldn’t have been a second personal foul called.

Harden dunked anyway, an amazing display of athleticism and will.

PBT Podcast: Conference Finals now best of three; plus Metta World Peace

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Both NBA Conference Finals are tied 2-2 in both the East and West — and breaking that down is not even the best part of this podcast.

That’s because NBA champion Metta World Peace joins us to talk about his new book, “No Malice: My Life in Basketball or: How a Kid from Queensbridge Survived the Streets, the Brawls, and Himself to Become an NBA Champion.” World Peace discusses the time he cracked Michael Jordan’s ribs in a summer game, how he was nervous before Game 7 of the NBA Finals in 2010, and how he was a pioneer in NBA players talking about mental health. (Metta’s portion of the podcast starts at 30:17, if you want to skip ahead).

Prior to that, Dan Feldman and Kurt Helin of NBC Sports dive into a discussion of the two conference finals series. LeBron James brought Cleveland back, but with the Celtics going home will the young players wearing green respond and change the momentum around again?

Do the Warriors have another gear and the ability to win another game on the road in Houston? How are both of those teams going to deal with fatigue from their tight rotations and intense games?

As always, you can check out the podcast below, listen and subscribe via iTunes at ApplePodcasts.com/PBTonNBC, subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

Clippers extend contract of coach Doc Rivers

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While not many people were noticing, Doc Rivers did arguably his best coaching job since coming to Los Angeles this season. Chris Paul forced his way to Houston before the season, then during it Blake Griffin was shipped off to Detroit. Then there were the injuries to Patrick Beverley and Danilo Gallinari, two players expected to be key contributors who played a combined 32 games. The offense too often felt like Lou Williams vs. The World, yet the Clippers finished above .500 (42-40) and pushed for a playoff spot until the final days of the regular season.

The Clippers noticed what a good job he did, and how well he handled things after losing his GM powers to Lawrence Frank. That’s why they have rewarded him with a contract extension (the details of which are not yet public).

“I am proud of the success we have had here over the last five seasons, but there is more work to be done,” said Rivers in a statement released by the team. “We are coming off a year where our team battled through many challenges and much adversity, proving deep talent and even greater potential. I am looking forward to getting back to work on the court to develop our players and compete with the NBA’s elite.”

“Doc is one of the top coaches in the NBA, coming off one of his finest seasons since joining the Clippers,” Clippers’ owner Steve Ballmer said in a statement. “We trust Doc to lead a competitive, tough, hard-working team while upholding a culture of accountability expected to resonate throughout the organization.”

Rivers was entering the final year of his contract, and neither side wanted him to be in a lame duck status.

For a Clippers franchise in transition, this is a stabilizing move. CP3 and Griffin are gone, DeAndre Jordan can be a free agent this summer, and Los Angeles has some big-picture questions about the direction to take the team it needs to answer. Unlike in Boston, Rivers is going to stick around for this restructuring.

Plus, this is good for Rivers, who makes no secret of the fact he likes living in Los Angeles. He has a comfort level with the city and the organization. Rivers likely took a healthy pay cut from the more than $10 million a year he was getting to be coach and GM, but it’s still good money and an organization he likes. So he is sticking around.