Report: Nets leave ‘Melo meeting “not confident,” but Knicks have own issues

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The Carmelo Anthony trade saga is nearing its end — finally — but like a soap opera’s final episodes the drama just seems to ramp up for the event. Here is where we stand Sunday morning.

Anthony and Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov broke break and had a shot of, um, water at a Los Angeles area restaurant early Saturday night.

The result should not thrill Nets fans, tweeted Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo:

After Carmelo Anthony sit-down with New Jersey ownership, “The Nets didn’t come away very confident,” a source briefed on meeting tells Y!

That would seem to put the Knicks in a position of strength….

But they are doing their best to shoot themselves in the foot — including maybe driving team president Donnie Walsh away — according to Ken Berger at CBSSports.

The Knicks’ willingness to part with three starting players — Wilson Chandler, Danilo Gallinari and Raymond Felton — plus Eddy Curry’s expiring contract and a first-round pick from another team, marked a significant departure from the patient strategy employed by team president Donnie Walsh. And sources told CBSSports.com Saturday that the involvement of (Knicks owner James) Dolan, leaning on the advice of former team president Isiah Thomas, could call into question Walsh’s willingness to remain with the team beyond this season.

Wojnarowski backs up the idea that Thomas and Dolan are the ones pushing this trade in this form.

This is Dolan’s show now — he met with Anthony, he and Thomas are calling the shots. This trade, if it goes forward as constructed, is vintage Thomas-era Knicks. If Anthony will not sign with the Nets, the Knicks are bidding against themselves, so there is no reason to part with three starters. What is more, this deal combined with Amar’e Stoudemire’s and a likely much lower salary cap in a new CBA, will make it very difficult or even impossible to sign a third star like Chris Paul or Deron Williams to go with these two. Melo and Amar’e will be your guys. And you’ll need good role players — like the ones you are trading away — to go around them to make this work at all. This move hamstrings the team for years to come against the cap. It is vintage Thomas.

If Anthony is not going to go to the Nets, the Knick can afford to be patient and lowball the Nuggets, forcing them to take less for fear of getting nothing. Walsh was letting the situation come to him. Dolan and Thomas showed the patience and nuance of a five-year-old. Or a sports talk radio caller.

Berger adds that the Nuggets do have their “nuclear option.” They could tell Anthony they will not trade him to the Knicks under any circumstances, he has to agree to a sign and trade with the Nets or stay with the Nuggets. It’s risky for Denver — he could stay, opt out of his deal, become a free agent and sign with the Knicks next summer as a free agent (the scenario that frankly would be best for the Knicks). The Nuggets risk becoming the Cavaliers. But for Anthony to do so would be to give up tens of millions of dollars — we don’t know what a max contract will look like in a new CBA, but you can bet it will be lower than the current one. Less than the three years, $65 million extension on the table.

Does Anthony want to go to the Knicks bad enough to risk giving up tens of millions in guaranteed money? Will Dolan make sure the trade happens now for the Knicks? Will Anthony wake up Sunday morning and think the Nets don’t look so bad?

All of this and more are coming in the final episodes of the ‘Melodrama.

Lakers owner Jeanie Buss: ‘I have complete faith in Magic Johnson … I have patience’

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Shortly after she hired Magic Johnson as team president last year, Lakers owner Jeanie Buss said she’d be heartbroken if the Lakers didn’t have an All-Star in 2018, when the game was in Los Angeles. Her urgency was apparent.

Of course, the Lakers didn’t have an All-Star last season. None came close.

But then they signed LeBron James this summer, and Buss has changed her tune.

The Rich Eisen Show:

Buss:

I have complete faith in Magic Johnson in terms of his ability to be a leader, to know how to put together a winner. And I have patience. And I think what he’s done has exceeded my expectations, how quickly they’ve kind of turned around the roster.

Johnson has done a great job running the Lakers. He cleared cap space while maintaining plenty of assets and convinced LeBron to sign.

The degree of difficulty on that is… debatable. Perhaps, LeBron just decided to join the Lakers and didn’t need much convincing.

What’s next for Johnson?

Maybe Rajon Rondo, Lance Stephenson, Michael Beasley and JaVale McGee will fit well with LeBron. Maybe Brandon Ingram, Kyle Kuzma, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart are ready to compete deep into the playoffs.

I’m skeptical, which means Johnson’s next steps will be tricky. He has more than earned Buss’ faith, and her patience gives him even more latitude to build as he sees fit.

Still, it’s a bit odd to see a team acquire a 33-year-old superstar then shift into a more-patient approach. LeBron’s prime won’t last forever.

It’s on Johnson to maximize it.

Danny Ainge roasts Celtics players on Twitter

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Celtics president Danny Ainge has built a star-studded and deep team. Boston even has a few extra first-round picks to get even better in future years. The Celtics have 15 players with standard contracts, the regular-season limit. Unlike last year, Boston probably won’t swing a major late-summer trade.

So, Ainge is spending his time clowning his players.

He got Jaylen Brown:

Then Terry Rozier:

Do more, Danny! Kyrie Irving is overdue for another social-media feud.

Did Kevin Durant choose Warriors within day of Thunder losing to them in 2016?

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The Warriors eliminated the Thunder in the 2016 Western Conference finals on May 30. On the following July 4, Durant announced he’d leave Oklahoma City for Golden State.

But when did Durant actually decide on signing with the Warriors?

Durant, Rich Kleiman (Durant’s business partner) and Rudy Cline-Thomas (Andre Iguodala‘s business partner) sat on a panel at Bloomberg’s Players Technology Summit.

Cline-Thomas, as transcribed by Drew Shiller of NBC Sports Bay Area:

“Remember 2017, you just lost to the Warriors — no 2016, you had just lost the Warriors, May — you and I get together after the game. I thought I was just gonna focus on not talking about basketball, and you wanted to focus on talking about Silicon Valley — asking me how it was out here.

“You had been following what Andre and I were doing, how it was being surrounded by all these CEOs, innovators and entrepreneurs. And I was like, ‘Wow. First and foremost, like yo — this dude just told me he’s about to sign with the Warriors, right (laughter). So, I was like I’m not gonna tell anybody, didn’t tell anybody whatsoever, didn’t want any rumors to get started…”

Durant on when he began thinking differently about business opportunities, via Shiller:

“Probably about 2015, I had got hurt. Basketball had always been my world … it stopped, and I had to think about other parts of my life and what I was interested in … it was rough because I didn’t know what I wanted to do or what I liked or what type of person I wanted to be … I started to hear about Andre and more guys around the NBA — especially that play for the Warriors — that took advantage of the opportunities of being in the Bay Area.

“So throughout that whole year, me and Rich were talking about investing in companies and what I like to do outside of ball. Then I (saw) you and just all those questions came out at once and I was basically telling you I was coming to the Warriors (laughter).”

Kleiman, via Shiller:

“Well I just learned that he told you in May, before free agency — which is hardly factual, which we’ll have to clear up with Marc Spears and everybody here (laughter) — no way did that happen, but cool… (laughter).”

Did Durant really tell Cline-Thomas in May of a plan to sign with the Warriors? Did Durant know his intentions and inadvertently show his hand while talking to Cline-Thomas? Did Durant not consciously know where he’d sign but reveal clues to Cline-Thomas during their conversation? Were Durant and Cline-Thomas just joking?

Was Kleiman trying to set the record straight? Was he just trying to cover for Durant?

Durant was back in Oklahoma City for a press conference June 1, 2016. So, when Cline-Thomas says “after the game,” it sounds as if he meant the night of Game 7.

Of course, that will raise all kinds of questions about Durant’s competitiveness in the 2016 Western Conference finals. If he had one foot out the door to join the Warriors, how motivated was he to beat them? But Durant was awesome throughout that series. Golden State was just a great team. I’m willing to give him the benefit of the doubt that he compartmentalized his feelings on the Warriors while facing them.

I also wouldn’t be surprised if he decided on Golden State shortly after the series. Draymond Green recruited Durant throughout that season. The Warriors’ desire to add Durant and their high level of appeal was well-established. Even without tampering, they didn’t have to wait until free agency officially began to become Durant’s choice. The NBA can control timing of permissible contact – not Durant’s mind.

It’s just tough to tell exactly what to take from Durant’s, Cline-Thomas’ and Kleiman’s comments – even with context of video:

Report: Kobe Bryant’s $6 million investment in sports drink now worth $200 million

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Kobe Bryant’s investment in BodyArmor is paying off – in a huge way.

Darren Rovell of ESPN:

Bryant made his first investment in the brand, for roughly 10 percent of the company, in March 2014, putting in a total of roughly $6 million over time. Based on the valuation of the Coca-Cola deal, his stake is now worth approximately $200 million, sources told ESPN.

Bryant earned about $330 million in his 20-year playing career. Add endorsements and this investment, and he could be approaching the level of wealth necessary to buy a major share of an NBA team (if that’s what he wants, which it doesn’t seem to be).

But we need greater context to understand Bryant’s acumen as an investor. If he diversified his portfolio, reporting on only the big winner could be extremely misleading. It’d be like saying Bryant made 11,719 shots. It’s impressive. But understanding how impressive requires knowing how many shots he attempted.