Cavs Win! Cavs Win! Cavs Win! (It still counts against the Clippers)

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There is something historically appropriate that the Cavaliers ended their losing streak against the Clippers.

Cleveland’s oddly fascinating losing streak ended dramatically at 26 with a 126-119 overtime win at home on Friday night. It seemed a fitting way to go — the Cavs had been giving the effort (mostly) for weeks, but had not been rewarded. Finally, for one night, the breaks and calls went their way.

It took J.J. Hickson getting away with a goaltend on a Baron Davis runner in the final seconds of regulation. It took Hickson getting a block on an attempted dunk by Blake Griffin late in the fourth quarter. (Yes, you read that right.) It took a clutch 3-pointer from Antawn Jamison. It took the return of Mo Williams bringing 17 points and 14 assists off the bench. It took a crazy-loud crowd that wouldn’t give up.

Mostly, it took a young Clippers team that played indifferent defense most of the night. A Clippers team with the same inconsistent end-of-game execution as the Cavs. A Clippers team that may grow into something special in a few years, but right now it is learning hard lessons about life on the road in the NBA.

And they are learning about how dangerous a desperate team can be.

After a lackluster performance a couple nights back that had coach Byron Scott calling out his team, the Cavaliers came out with energy again. They had done that for most games in the last few weeks, but were not rewarded.

Hickson had the play of the night with 3:30 left in regulation, the one that made you realize it was the Cavs’ night and made Quicken Loans Arena the loudest it has been since he who shall not be named played in the building.

Griffin got the ball on the right block and tried to do what he has done to so many, spun fast to the middle to go for the dunk, but he brought the ball back to his right hand and that gave a hustling Hickson a chance to block a Griffin dunk. Yes, block Blake Griffin. THE Blake Griffin. It sparked a fast break that ended with a three from Mo Williams, and with 3:27 left the Cavs were up by six.

Of course, they almost blew it. They are the Cavs, after all.

By 2:15 left, it was tied. A driving layup by Davis, a transition dunk from Griffin, and two free throws after a foul on Ryan Gomes did the trick.

The Cavs kept hitting shots, the Clippers kept getting fouled and to the free-throw line. It was Williams — who missed 13 games in a row before this one — that made the last basket of regulation, a professional 17-foot step-back to tie it. But the shot left Clippers 6.3 seconds left to win it.

Everyone in the building knew Davis would take the shot. He does not pass in these situations, but at least he attacked and didn’t settle for a 25-foot step-back. He drove left and got off a runner that Hickson came from the weakside to swat into the third row. It clearly looked like goaltending, but it was the Cavs’ night and there was no call.

The shot in overtime was a three from Jamison off an inbound play (which came after Hickson got away with an over-the-back, but did we mention it was the Cavs’ night?). A catch-and-shoot drained three-ball from the veteran that sealed the win.

This win ruins the “Toilet Bowl” battle of streaks against the winless-on-the-road Wizards on Sunday, but nobody in Cleveland cares.

The monkey is off their back. Now they can get back to focusing on making sure they have the most ping-pong balls in the draft lottery.

Report: Danny Green opting in with Spurs for $10 million

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Danny Green loooves the Spurs.

He re-signed with San Antonio for a discount in 2015. Lately, he has been trying to defuse tension at every turn of the Kawhi Leonard saga.

That’s not working.

But Green can handle his own business with the Spurs.

Jabari Young of the San Antonio Express-News:

League sources tell the Express-News Green will likely forgo free agency and exercise the final year of his contract with the Spurs

By exercising his player option, Green will earn $10 million next season. It was hard to see him leaving San Antonio regardless, but that’s probably more than he’d earn on the open market.

Green brings a lot of value as a 3-and-D shooting guard. But the league is stuffed with bad contracts against a barely rising salary cap, leaving little money for 2018 free agents.

At least Green already secured a healthy salary in a place he likes.

PBT Podcast: NBA Draft breakdown with winners, losers, sleepers

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The Phoenix Suns didn’t screw up the No. 1 pick landing DeAndre Ayton, but they also made an interesting — maybe safe — move getting Mikal Bridges in a trade to give them a promising young core.

The Atlanta Hawks got their man in Trae Young, but the Dallas Mavericks did better getting theirs in Luka Doncic with the trade between those two teams.

The Sacramento Kings got their man in Marvin Bagley. Michael Porter Jr. and Robert Williams fell down the draft.

Kurt Helin and Dan Feldman of NBC Sports break down all of it in this latest podcast: Who were the winners and losers, who were the sleepers, and what it means heading into free agency this summer.

As always, you can check out the podcast below, listen and subscribe via iTunes at ApplePodcasts.com/PBTonNBC, subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

Rumor: Tension between Chris Paul and Rockets over contract

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Chris Paul sacrificed $10,083,055 last season by opting in to facilitate a trade to the Rockets rather than opting out and signing somewhere for a max salary.

He expects to be made whole. And by most accounts, Houston understands the arrangement.

But here’s a rumor otherwise.

Undisputed:

Chris Broussard:

From what I’m told, there is tension now between Houston and Chris Paul. Because there was definitely some type of handshake, wink wink, “we’re going to max you out” last summer. But here’s the thing: Now, they’re not so sure. Houston, with good reason, doesn’t want to do that. But they’ve got an out, because they have new ownership. So, Daryl Morey can go to Chris Paul and be like, “I want to do it, but we’ve got the new owner doesn’t want to give you five years, four years.”

Former Rockets owner Leslie Alexander committed to big expenditures. New owner Tillman Ferttita has talked about his spending limits – for good reason. He sunk so much of his personal wealth into buying the team. He might not be able to afford outrageous luxury-tax bills.

Starters Clint Capela and Trevor Ariza will also become free agents this summer. Houston definitely wants to keep Capela. A large contract for Paul would be prohibitive.

Paul’s max projects to be about $205 million over five years. Already 33, he almost certainly won’t produce enough on the court to justify that amount. Players that age just decline and face greater injury risk.

But the downside of not paying him that much could be losing him. Even playing hardball could offend him given the circumstances that brought him to Houston. The Rockets are contending. A bad contract a few years down the road would be worth it if they win a title, and Paul is instrumental to that push.

This could be a delicate situation, and Morey can probe at least a little if he chooses. Would Paul be understanding of the ownership change? What options will Paul have better than a large, but sub-max, contract from the Rockets? Would Paul take a discount if Houston got his friend LeBron James?

But push too hard, and would Paul bolt to play with LeBron on the Lakers?

There has been too much insistence that Paul re-signing with the Rockets was assured to completely trust Broussard’s report. But it’d also be a mistake to completely ignore the possibility talks have broken down.

Hawks GM: We might have traded up with Bucks if their draft pick didn’t leak first

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Let’s pick up with the No. 16 pick in last night’s NBA draft.

The Suns were on the clock and planning to pick Donte DiVincenzo. John Gambadoro of Arizona Sports 98.7:

But then 76ers called Phoenix about trading No. 10 pick Mikel Bridges for the No. 16 pick and a future first-rounder. The teams agreed to the deal (causing this heartbreaking moment), and the Suns picked Zhaire Smith for Philadelphia.

The next three picks:

17. Donte DiVincenzo, Bucks

18. Lonnie Walker, Spurs

19. Kevin Huerter, Hawks

Atlanta general manager Travis Schlenk on 95.7 The Game, via ESPN:

“Last night, for instance, we had the 19th pick, and we’re coming down and we’re actually talking to Milwaukee on the 17th pick, talking about trading up to get a guy we like,” Schlenk said. “There’s were a couple of guys we felt really good about on the 19th pick, obviously Kevin [Huerter] was one of them, and it leaked who Milwaukee was going to take.

“So, all of a sudden, we were able to pull back out of that deal and keep the draft pick instead of packaging picks to move up because we knew that, two guys on the board we felt really good about and only one team in between us, so that was beneficial to us last night.”

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports and Jeff Goodman of ESPN reported the Bucks picking DiVincenzo at 9:18 p.m.:

The pick became official at 9:22 p.m.:

Clearly, Atlanta wanted Huerter or “Mystery Player Not Named Donte DiVincenzo.”* Once they learned Milwaukee would take DiVincenzo at No. 17, the Hawks knew at least one of Huerter or “Mystery Player Not Named Donte DiVincenzo” would be available at No. 19.

*I think there’s a good chance it was Walker, whom San Antonio picked No. 18.

That saved the Hawks an asset(s) and cost the Bucks an asset(s), though perhaps Milwaukee couldn’t have gotten DiVincenzo at No. 19. Maybe the Spurs would’ve selected him at No. 18.

Still, the Bucks didn’t protect their internal plans well enough. Maybe that’s an organizational flaw. But this also could have been a fluky sequence of events. Perhaps, after hearing Phoenix would take DiVincenzo, someone in Milwaukee felt comfortable sharing that the Bucks wanted him. Then, when he surprisingly fell, it was too late. The information was already out there – allowing Atlanta to stand pat.