These should be your All-Star Game reserves

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The fans have spoken — the 10 NBA All-Star Game starters have been chosen. And as we said before, good on ya. The fans did well this time around.

The way this works is the fans pick the five starters, then the coaches (or more likely an assistant coach, or the video guy, or the team PR guy) pick the next seven. Then David Stern gets one last pick, because he is David Stern.

We’re not sure who the coaches will pick, but here’s who they should pick. Or at least who would be on our ballot if we were a coach (or an assistant coach, or the video guy, or the team PR guy).

Eastern Conference:

Al Horford (Atlanta Hawks, center): Dude is blowing up this season and nobody noticed. He’s still scoring (16.3 per game) but doing it with the best shooting percentage of his career (57 percent). His rebounding is still strong, but his assist percentage is way up while his turnovers are way down. Horford is another guy who exemplifies why the ballot needs to be changed.

Chris Bosh (Miami Heat, forward): Averaging 18.2 points and 8.6 rebounds, and if you don’t think he’s key for Miami you haven’t watched the last couple games with him out.

Kevin Garnett (Boston Celtics, forward): The anchor of the best team in the East so far. He is moving like the old KG this season, and that should scare teams come the playoffs.

Paul Pierce (Boston Celtics, forward): Scoring 19 points a game to lead the Celtics and shooting a better-than-Ray Allen 51.4 percent. This isn’t really even a question, unless you are Josh Smith’s mom.

Ray Allen (Boston Celtics, guard): Bill Walton was doing the Boston broadcast of last night’s game and said this of Allen’s jumper: “Flawless … like Yosemite Falls coming right through the rim.” Couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

Rajon Rondo (Boston Celtics, guard): I can’t wait to see him throw an ally-oop to LeBron in transition. Maybe the best passing point guard in the game, and he’s improved his game enough to be here easily.

And yes, four Celtics get in.

Carlos Boozer (Chicago Bulls, forward): He’s only played 27 games since returning from a hand injury, and he’s missed games since… and he’s still the best player in the East for the final spot. You can make a case for Joe Johnson or Josh Smith out of Atlanta, there’s a buzz for Raymond Felton. I would not be livid with any of those. But for the guy who has been the best when he played, it’s Boozer for me.

As tough as that last pick was, it’s nothing like choosing the reserves for the…

Western Conference:

Pau Gasol (Los Angeles Lakers, forward): He probably should have been chosen over Carmelo Anthony by the fans, but Gasol should get to start anyway when Gregg Popovich names him to step in for Yao Ming. Gasol still the most fundamentally sound big in the game.

Dirk Nowitzki (Dallas Mavericks, forward): This is another gimmee — until his injury he was in the running for league MVP. Plus, we need someone in this game to shoot a lot of contested long two pointers… wait, forgot we already had ‘Melo.

Kevin Love (Minnesota Timberwolves, forward): The best rebounder in the game. Nifty footwork that gets him good looks. The game should be about rewarding excellence and Love has been that this season, even if it took Kurt Rambis a while to realize it.

Blake Griffin (Los Angeles Clippers, forward): Tough call with LaMarcus Aldridge, Lamar Odom and David West all being very deserving. At the end of the day the All-Star game is an exhibition, and while I might pick West first for a playoff game I’ll take Griffin first in this setting.

Manu Ginobili (San Antonio Spurs, guard): The best player and leading scorer on the best team in the league. Another must from the coaches.

Russell Westbrook (Oklahoma City Thunder, guard): If the Thunder are a better team this season, Westbrook is the reason why. He has taken a leap forward.

Deron Williams (Utah Jazz, guard): He is the Utah Jazz, and the Jazz are pretty good (well, except for the past couple weeks, but we’ll overlook that for these purposes). Debate if he is the best or third best PG in the game, but he is certainly an All-Star.

Yao Ming’s replacement (David Stern will fill this roster spot): Tim Duncan (San Antonio Spurs, center, er, forward): Yes he’s older, the scoring and offense now flow through Ginobili and Parker. Yes, Tyson Chandler is a legitimate consideration here. Duncan still anchors the defense, rebounds and gets key buckets for the league’s best team. He has earned the spot.

Should the Raptors use this retro floor next season? (PHOTO)

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Teens keep releasing retro floors for the upcoming 2019-20 NBA season. Retro jerseys accompanied a lot of these floor releases, and teams like the Portland Trail Blazers, Memphis Grizzlies, and Charlotte Hornets have dipped heavily into the nostalgia sphere.

This season it could be much the same for the Toronto Raptors.

In a graphic posted it to r/nba this week, a potential new floor for the Raptors showed something a bit different.

Or should we call it an old floor?

Just months after Toronto won the NBA championship, it appears that they might be looking to harken back to the team’s very first year in existence.

Via Reddit:

What do you think? Are you a fan of the old purple dinosaur look, or do you think that nostalgia has tinged of the lenses of our judgement?

Team USA plays down loss to Australia: The real thing doesn’t start until China”

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It was the first time Team USA has lost an international game since 2006 — 78 straight wins. That seemed like a big deal.

It absolutely was huge for the 52,000 in attendance in Melbourne, where Australia was the one that upset the USA. This was validation for a strong basketball country and program — remember in the 2016 Olympics they lost by just 10 to a USA team with Kevin Durant, and it took a late push from Kyrie Irving and Carmelo Anthony to secure that win — that has never quite gotten the huge win on the international stage.

But after the loss, members of Team USA chalked it up as a learning experience. Coach Gregg Popovich said that, and the players followed suit. Quotes via Eric Nehm of The Athletic.

Kemba Walker: “Teams lose. We are just going to take this loss and build from it, that’s all we can do is continue to try our best to get better. The real thing doesn’t start until China, so we’ve got one more game. We’re going to head to Sydney and focus on Canada and from that point out the real thing starts. That’s all we are worried about, just continuing to get better, continuing to learn each other.”

Donovan Mitchell: “To be honest, this game doesn’t mean anything. Obviously it hurts to lose, but I look at this and we look at this as more of a learning experience as opposed to we just lost. That’s the mindset. If you think of this as a loss, you start to get carried away with all that.”

Technically, all of that is true. If the USA goes on to win gold at the World Cup, this will be but a blip on the radar.

But the loss also showed just far Team USA is away from that goal and how much work there is to do. Watch the game and what stood out — besides Patty Mills getting red hot and dropping 30, with 13 of that in the fourth quarter — was the difference in cohesion and chemistry. The core of this Australian squad has been playing together for a decade, and with Andrew Bogut as the offensive fulcrum (and Joe Ingles playing that role some) guys were cutting, moving with purpose, and seemingly always in the right place to get an open look or layup.

The Americans are trying to build chemistry on the fly and it comes and goes. Particularly on the defensive end. Team USA members lose guys on cuts, don’t help the helper consistently, and for stretches look like a team just thrown together. Especially under pressure, when the ball movement stops and there is too much one-on-one on offense.

This American squad still has the talent to overwhelm and beat most of the world. However, with some of the USA’s top talent staying home, there are a handful of teams out there — Serbia, Spain, Australia, France — with the talent to hang, and then it becomes about chemistry and execution. Team USA was beaten badly in those hard-to-quantify categories by Australia. The American’s margin for error is much smaller in this World Cup.

Maybe the loss galvanizes Team USA in a way nothing else could. Maybe. And the players are right that things don’t really matter for the USA until the games in China.

But Team USA still has a lot to prove.

James Harden working on one-legged step-back three for next season

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As if James Harden wasn’t unstoppable enough.

Harden’s step-back three has become probably the most unstoppable shot in the NBA. Now video has gone viral in NBA circles of Harden working on a one-legged, step-back three. Think Dirk Nowitzki’s one-legged jumper, but from three and with a little more side-to-side to it. (You can see the video above.) Harden talked to Tim MacMahon of ESPN about it.

“I’m not sure; it’s something that I work on,” Harden said when asked if he’ll use the one-legged, step-back 3 this season. “But you know how Mike [Jordan] has his fadeaway and Dirk [Nowitzki] has his one-leg and [Kareem Abdul-Jabbar] had the sky hook, I want my step-back to be one of those moves that last forever. So when I travel around the world and I see little kids that [say], ‘Hey James, I got a step-back!’ — I love to see that.

“It’s me being a creator and me being an innovator and paving the way in basketball in my own way, doing it how I want to do it, and that’s what it’s all about. As a little kid playing in these parks, that’s what I imagined, that’s what I dreamed of. Now it’s coming to reality, so it’s pretty cool.”

Harden is going to score a lot of points… or, maybe the better way to say that is he’s going to score even more points if he gets to a point he unleashes that in a game.

The challenge this season for Harden will be balance — he’s got to share the court and the ball with Russell Westbrook. Both of them are at their best with the ball in their hands, creating in isolation, but they need to be more than that. While coach Mike D’Antoni can do some things to help with that balance (staggering their minutes as much as possible) for the Rockets to become the contenders they want to be Harden and Westbrook have to be more than “your turn, now it’s my turn” on offense.

But when it’s Harden’s turn, that one-legged step back will be fun to watch.

Derrick White didn’t lose teeth, passes concussion test after nasty fall in USA loss

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There were plenty of ugly things for Team USA in its loss to Australia on Saturday — most of them on the defensive end — but later in the day on Saturday there was some good news.

It sounds like point guard Derrick White will be fine after his nasty fall and face plant during the game, reports Tom Osborne of the San Antonio Express-News.

In the middle of the fourth quarter, White was pushing the ball upcourt after an Australia miss and either got clipped from behind — there was a foul called — or stumbled over his own feet. I lean clipped, but the video is not conclusive.

White fell and faceplanted, with his head bouncing off the court. If he got away with just stitches, that’s good news for Team USA. If White had a concussion it is possible he would have missed the start of the World Cup, and the USA is not deep at the point guard spot on this roster (Kemba Walker and White are the only true point guards, a couple of players such as Marcus Smart can play a few minutes there but aren’t really suited to the position).

Team USA has one more exhibition game against Canada, then opens World Cup play on Sept. 1 in China against the Czech Republic.