In case you forgot, Donald Sterling can be an embarrassment

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Donald Sterling. While other owners strive to reach his level he remains to gold standard.

Well, maybe the coal standard. Or, um, fertilizer standard.

Let’s ignore his Clippers slow start on the court — they are entertaining and show some promise in spite of everything — and talk about him off the court. Remember that former general manager Elgin Baylor is suing Sterling for wrongful termination? Well, some papers from the deposition come out that make you shake your head.

Courtesy Lisa Dillman at the Los Angeles Times, there is this:

In court papers, Baylor said that Jim Brewer, then an assistant with the Clippers, wanted the chance to interview for the head coaching job after Bill Fitch was dismissed following the 1997-98 season.

“I believe he [Sterling] was a little reluctant at first but I said, ‘We owe him that courtesy.’ So we go there and we sit down and Brewer starts talking about his qualifications, that he believed he could do the job of being the head coach,” Baylor said in court papers.

“And when he finished, Donald said something that was very shocking to me. He said, ‘Personally, I would like to have a white Southern coach coaching poor black players. And I was shocked. And he looked at me and said, ‘Do you think that’s a racist statement?’ I said, ‘Absolutely. That’s plantation mentality.”

Or this.

The deposition also touches on the Danny Manning contract negotiations, which were mentioned in the initial court papers filed by Baylor’s legal team in 2008.

Manning was the No. 1 draft pick overall in the 1988 draft. Baylor, in the deposition, incorrectly said it was the 1989 draft. Negotiations became contentious and Baylor spoke about a meeting at Sterling’s house among Manning and his representatives and Clippers officials.

When Manning’s agent told Sterling that the offer was unacceptable, Sterling responded by saying it was a lot of money.

Said Baylor, in the deposition: “Donald T. said, ‘Well that’s a lot of money for a poor black … ‘ — I think he said kid. For a poor black kid I think. For a poor black something, kid or boy or something. Poor black. Poor black.

“Danny was upset. So Danny just stormed out. He just stormed out of the place. Where he went, I don’t know. He never came back to the house.”

These are the most recent examples in a long and sadly similar list from a variety of lawuits that swirl around Sterling. There is nothing more to say about the man.