All owners not on same page with CBA negotiations (neither are all players)

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There isn’t going to be any contraction of NBA teams, it’s a red herring in negotiations.

Why? Because first you need an owner willing to sell his team back to the league, and right now nobody seems willing (although NBA Commissioner David Stern did say on Los Angeles radio today it has happened in the past, just not recently). Even if there was, you’d have to convince all 29 other owners to pitch in to buy the team from the selling owner, by spending $250 million to $300 million at least (say roughly $10 million per owner). Will not happen.

How contraction ends up on the table at all is interesting, because it comes out of the fact that all the owners are not on the same page heading into the Collective Bargaining Agreement talks. A small market vs. big market debate on limiting salaries and revenue sharing has started but that is different than consensus.

Stern tries to make it like there is consensus, as he did in a pre-game press conference before the Lakers opener Tuesday. Look at what he said about revenue sharing:

“And actually we have broad agreement by the large grossing teams that this is a fair and necessary subject for discussion and that’s where we are.”

So where they are is that the big market teams — the Buss family and the Lakers, the Dolans with the Knicks, and a handful of others — are willing to talk about it. Not agree to it, not reach into their wallets and fork over money to strengthen competitors. They are just saying everyone should talk about it.

“On top of that with revenue sharing, which is a subject that’s going to be very much at the fore and I’m keeping it there, that’s what leads to discussion if we’re going to give a cut of TV money and we’re going to give revenue sharing — do we need so many teams?” said Stern….

“A team might raise its hand — and has — and said, ‘Listen, if we’re (giving up) $30 million from network television money and… let’s say we’re going to have to pay another $15 million in revenue sharing.  That’s $45 million. If (we’re paying it to) a team that’s never going to be profitable, why are we doing that?  Why don’t we have a different discussion?’”

And that’s how contraction gets on the table. Some big market owners trying to get leverage in their internal battle with small markets over revenue sharing.

The big market owners see what has happened with revenue sharing in baseball, where the Yankees and Red Sox and other have paid but some small market owners have basically just pocketed the money. The NBA big market owners want re-investment and some value back for what they give up.

We’re focused on the owners here, because Stern discussed it in a press conference a couple nights ago, but there are similar issues on the players’ side. Are the handful of max-deal players out there willing have their earnings cut back so that there can be more of a middle class in the NBA? Or are we evolving toward an NBA where there are a small percentage of guys at the top making huge money because they draw in fans and sell jerseys, then everybody else makes a million or two max? You can bet all the players are not on the same page about this.

It’s complex. Stern seems confident he can get there, that these same people have essentially negotiated the last few of these CBAs and they get the game. Maybe. But Stern works for the owners and I’ve talked to enough people on the owners’ side to know a few want blood, they want to make radical changes in the economics of the game and if that means missing part of a season with a lockout, so be it.

Everyone is not on the same page about that, either.

Kevin Love tries to ignore trade rumors, ‘let the chips fall where they may’

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Cleveland Cavaliers GM said he has no interest in trading Kevin Love.

You can count the number of people around the league who believe him on one hand. There’s a good chance Love is still on the Cavaliers at the end of this season, but that’s more about him being in the first year of a four-year, $120 million contract extension than it is Cleveland’s willingness to trade him (or interest from other teams, if money was not an issue). The Cavaliers are rebuilding, and if they can get young players and picks for Love, they have to consider it.

With Portland off to a slow start, and Love growing up in the Pacific Northwest, that rumor has floated around. There are others. Love is just trying to ignore them and play ball, he told Arash Markazi of the Los Angeles Times.

“I know there’s talk about me possibly being the missing piece somewhere,” Love said. “There’s been constant chatter since I signed that I could be traded. It’s one of those things where I’m going to keep doing right by the team, by Cleveland and by the organization. If my number is called, so be it, but I’m going to stay true to my commitment and let the chips fall where they may.”

Love, who has been open in recent years about his struggles with anxiety and mental health, said dealing with the trade rumors that constantly swirl around him can be a challenge on that front.

“A big aspect of mental health is just staying in the present but it’s so hard,” he said. “You have to try to not get too far ahead of yourself or get worked up. You can get that anxious feeling or fear for the future, but you have to try to stay focused on getting better and let things work out the way they should.”

Kevin Love has played well to start the season, averaging 18.3 points and 11.3 rebounds a game, shooting a respectable 34.7 percent from three. He could help a lot of teams, particularly ones in the West who want to be in the mix for a ring but who look at the Lakers and Clippers and think, “we have to get better fast.”

The rumors around Love are just going to get louder the closer and closer we get to the trade deadline. Love will have to do a lot of work to tune all that out.

 

Bulls big man Luke Kornet out following surgery on sinus obstruction

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Just before last Christmas, Luke Kornet broke his nose. Apparently, that never healed quite right.

Kornet underwent surgery to repair a sinus obstruction on Monday, the Chicago Bulls announced. There is no timetable for his return, although coach Jim Boylen suggested it could be less than two weeks.

Bulls coach Jim Boylen added this at practice, via NBC Sports Chicago.

“Kornet had sinus surgery this morning. He had blockage and some issues from a previous fracture from when he was in New York. We just felt it was time to go in there and clean that thing out. That happened this morning at 6 AM. He’s out. Surgery went well. We’ll have more to report as we go. Originally, it was a seven-ten-day thing where he’d be back. I think it’s one of those things they don’t know until they get in there how extreme it is. But he had blockage and it needed to be done.”

This does not impact the Bulls much on the court as Kornet has fallen out of the rotation in recent games (in part because of the sinus condition, in part because he just hasn’t played well). Kornet signed a two-year, $4.5 million contract with the Bulls over the summer.

D’Angelo Russell says weather played ‘major part’ in picking Warriors over Timberwolves

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D'Angelo Russell wants to play with Karl-Anthony Towns. Towns’ Timberwolves were reportedly interested in Russell last summer.

Why did Russell join the Warriors instead of Minnesota?

Russell, via Chris Hine of the Minneapolis StarTribune:

“I thought the opportunity here was amazing … ” Russell said after Warriors shootaround Friday. “It was definitely something I was considering very strongly. But then when this opportunity came, the weather is way better, so that helped me.”

“I did my first winter in New York and that was tough,” Russell said. “So to get the opportunity to go somewhere where it’s warm again, I think that played a major part in my plan.”

I don’t blame him one bit.

Russell grew up in Kentucky then finished high school in Florida. He spent his first couple NBA seasons with the Lakers.

He also played collegiately at Ohio State and a a couple years for the Nets. In other words, he spent enough time in cold-weather locations to know how miserable they can be.

This is an issue that will always hinder teams like the Timberwolves. It doesn’t mean they can’t attract free agents. It’s just a disadvantage.

There will always be players who don’t have multiple max offers. Minnesota can separate itself with money, playing time and other considerations.

But good for Russell for playing himself out of that group and earning a max contract in the Bay Area.

Kyrie Irving (shoulder) out for Nets-Pacers

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Kyrie Irving missed the Nets’ win over the Bulls on Saturday.

He’s not healthy enough to play the Pacers tonight.

Nets public relations:

Kyrie Irving (right shoulder impingement) is OUT.

Brooklyn (5-7) lags behinds Indiana (7-6) in the Eastern Conference’s middle morass. The Nets must try to catch up in the playoff race without their best player.

But it’s a long season. Brooklyn has plenty of time to gain ground. Spencer Dinwiddie is capable in relief, and the unselfish Nets can create ball movement while Dinwiddie rests.

I’m more concerned about next week. A segment of Brooklyn’s schedule:

  • Nov. 24 at Knicks
  • Nov. 25 at Cavaliers
  • Nov. 27 at Celtics

That’s the team Irving spurned in free agency, the team Irving requested a trade from and the team Irving just left after pledging to re-sign. Those are juicy matchups. Hopefully, Irving is healthy enough to play in all three.