Mike Krzyzewski runs a tight ship, but negates Team USA's greatest strength in the process

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odom_splitter_team_usa.jpgTeam USA is filled with hyper-athletic and versatile players, but the squad’s greatest strength is not its speed, its leaping ability, or the varied skill sets of its players. Above all else, the Americans’ greatest asset is their depth. While a team like Spain may have as many as eight NBA-caliber players, the American squad is loaded with NBA talent at every position. Even without the likes of LeBron James, Kobe Bryant, et al on the roster, Team USA has more talent from top to bottom than any other squad in the tournament.

Yet thus far, in games against Team USA’s most skilled opponents, Mike Krzyzewski has turned to a top-heavy rotation heavily dependent on its starters. It’s an understandable tactic for most NBA and NCAA teams, but given how talented this roster is? And more importantly, how roughly congruent every non-Durant talent on the roster happens to be? It’s ludicrous.

It would be one thing if those on the floor for Team USA were playing particularly well together, or were in some sort of offensive rhythm. That certainly wasn’t the case against Brazil though, as the U.S. team committed turnover after turnover, botched their pick-and-roll coverage frequently, and lacked any fluency whatsoever on either offense or defense. Some players performed better than others, but aside from Kevin Durant, no one on the court made themselves essential.

Tiago Splitter was able to post and score over Lamar Odom easily, while Team USA’s greatest Splitter deterrent, Tyson Chandler, collected dust. Odom grabbed rebounds but little else, while Kevin Love, a far more accomplished rebounder and a more efficient scorer than the version of Odom that showed up on Monday, sat on the bench. Chauncey Billups clanked another shot and Derrick Rose lost control of his dribble, all while Curry and Gordon, two perfectly capable two-way guards, watched with fresh legs.

What’s a bit more distressing: this isn’t the first time Krzyzewski has used such a rotation. He did the very same thing against Spain. In an exhibition game. In the match-ups with Spain and Brazil, Team USA’s starters averaged 158.5 out of a total 200 minutes. Against Croatia and Slovenia, the starters averaged just 100 minutes.

Now, it’s easy to point to the lopsided differential in both of those contests (particularly in comparison to the close games against Spain and Brazil), and explain away that discrepancy as a garbage time byproduct. However, in doing so, you’d be ignoring the way in which Team USA has built leads in the first place. Though Rose, Billups, Iguodala, and Odom have all played well at times, they didn’t run up the score early and then rest while the subs finished the job. Krzyzewski’s squad has been most successful when relying on a deep rotation to build and maintain leads throughout the game.

Forget about the starters’ endurance. This is about Team USA having the best lineups on the floor to give them the best chance to win every game. Sometimes those lineups will feature Billups and Odom, albeit likely for shorter stretches. At other times, it may be Love or Gordon in a particularly good rhythm. Everything should be fluid with Team USA’s rotation, because Durant aside, there are no standouts to demand floor time.

Patrick Ewing on Knicks firing David Fizdale: “Very disappointed in that”

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Knicks legend Patrick Ewing currently is waist deep… well, at his height maybe knee deep, in the college basketball season. His Georgetown team is off to a solid 6-3 start with a game at Syracuse coming up this Saturday.

He still has time for his SiriusXM radio show, “Center Court with Patrick Ewing,” where he said he was “very disappointed” to see David Fizdale let go.

“Very disappointed in that. I think that Fiz is an outstanding coach. I’ve had an opportunity to get to know him over the years, met him when he was working for the Hawks. And just want to let him know that I support him and I know he’s looking forward to his next opportunity, but he is a very good coach and I was disappointed to see him getting let go.”

Coaches back the other coaches, it’s a fraternity that way. Rick Carlise is the master of it.

Fizdale is not blameless for the current state of the Knicks, his rotations and ability to develop young players certainly are in question, but he wasn’t the root of the problem. The best analogy I can come up with is Fizdale was the first contestant sent home on “Chopped”: Nobody was going to make a delicious meal out of the horribly mismatched ingredients in that basket, but the chef still has to do something cohesive with it. Fizdale did not.

The question becomes, is team president Steve Mills — the long-time Knicks employee who has known how to survive in James Dolan’s world — going to finally be let go and a big name brought in, or are the Knicks just rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.

Pacers fans still boo Paul George, he responds with 34 through three quarters (VIDEO)

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Don’t make Paul George angry. You wouldn’t like him when he’s angry (if you’re the opposing team).

It was a couple of seasons ago, but the wounds of Paul George forcing his way out of Indiana are still fresh for Pacers fans, so they booed him when he handed the ball at points during the Clippers visit to Indiana.

George’s response? Go get buckets and tell the crowd to “shhh.”

Like 21 points in the first half buckets.

And 34 points after three quarters, with seven from beyond the arc.

The Clippers — without Kawhi Leonard on the back-to-back — were up double digits in the fourth quarter in Indiana. George will be your player of the game for L.A.

Kevin Love on latest rumors Cleveland will trade him: ‘Nothing’s changed’

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Kevin Love has heard it all before.

Rumors floated around Cleveland was going to trade Love in the summer of 2015 after his first season with the team. They sprung up again the next season at the trade deadline — before Love played a central role in Cleveland winning a ring. The rumors kept springing up, especially after LeBron James left. Then this past summer, Love signed a four-year, $120 million extension to stay in Cleveland.

That has not stopped the rumors.

Love was asked about the rumors and sounded unmoved by them but a little frustrated, via Tim Bontemps of ESPN.

“Nothing’s changed,” Love told ESPN after Cleveland’s morning shootaround at TD Garden. “What I mean by that is, since I got here they’ve been … since I f—ing got here, there’s been talk of me being traded, so it’s nothing different. If they decide to go that way, I’ve just got to know it’s part of the business, or if we decide to go that way, it’s part of the business.

“Truthfully, I don’t know how it’s going to play out, because I see both sides.”

This time it feels like Love could get moved, if not at the trade deadline then this summer — and he wants to go to a contender.

The logic is simple: Cleveland is rebuilding, Love is still a stretch four and good rebounder who can help a playoff team. Love is averaging 16.1 points and 10.5 rebounds a game, is shooting 37.1 percent from three, and remains one of the best outlet passers in the game. Boston, Denver, Portland and a host of other teams could use him this season.

The challenge is that massive contract, which is why a trade may be put off until next summer.

Whatever happens, Love isn’t going to stress over it.

It’s official: Gordon Hayward makes return to Celtics lineup Monday

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He beat the timeline by a full two weeks.

Gordon Hayward fractured his hand on a fluke play against the Spurs that required surgery to repair (he fractured the fourth metacarpal, the bone that connects the wrist to the ring finger). When he had surgery on Nov. 11, the timeline for a return was 6-8 weeks.

One month later, Hayward has been cleared to make his return Monday night against Cleveland.

This is good news for Boston and its offense. Hayward was having a bounce-back year through his first eight games, averaging 18.9 points per game, shooting 43.3 percent from three, pulling down 7.1 rebounds, and dishing out 4.1 assists per game. Even more than Kemba Walker, it was Hayward who was the playmaker for others and kept the offense flowing.

Not that Boston struggled too much with Hayward out. The Celtics went 9-4 with a +5.9 net rating in the games he missed, although the team’s offense slid back to middle-of-the-pack without his scoring and shot creation.

He’s back, and Boston — the second best team in the East so far this young season — just got a little better.