Lou Amundson is done in Phoenix, but the Hornets, Warriors, and Pacers are knocking on his door

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LThumbnail image for amundson_blog_090117_300.jpgouis Amundson was the most understated of Phoenix’s tremendously successful reserve unit last season. Leandro Barbosa was the established veteran scorer, and could catch lightning in a bottle. Goran Dragic was the young up-and-comer, officially hosting his coming out party on the Spurs’ home court during the first round of the playoffs. Channing Frye was the big surprise, knocking down threes at a ridiculous clip before going a bit cold in the post-season. Jared Dudley endeared himself to anyone who flipped on a Suns’ game wish his shooting, hustle, and personality.

Somewhere in there was Amundson, the rebounding and defensive specialist that allowed the whole thing to work. He guarded opposing bigs, rebounded like hell (compensating for having Channing Frye as his frontcourt running mate), and did the little things that allowed the Suns to rest Amar’e Stoudemire and sit Jarron Collins. That was pretty huge, when you really think about it.

Yet with Hedo Turkoglu likely to fill in minutes at the 4, newcomer Hakim Warrick slated to play there as well, and second round pick Gani Lawal signed and delivered, there’s not really a place for Amundson anymore. He could play some center for them, but Phoenix seems very much content to use Lawal in a similar capacity, and he comes with a far cheaper price tag.

The Suns probably made the right move. Amundson is the kind of player who is useful but ultimately expendable. There are other rebounders, other hustle guys, and other big bodies out there who can fill in Lou’s minutes. That’s not to say that Amundson doesn’t have a place in this league — he’s very much a legit NBA player — but can you really blame Phoenix for signing a younger, bigger player with decent potential that can run the court and rebound instead of Lou? Especially when that player comes at a sub-million salary?

Amundson never wanted to leave Phoenix. But the Suns had other options and took them, which is just the way it goes sometimes.

Now Amundson, who has been a free agent for far too long, will be forced to sign elsewhere. For an idea of which teams might be interested, we turn to Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

It appears, though, that Amundson’s wait might finally be ending.
Sources close to the situation say that the 6-foot-9, 225-pounder is
inching closer to a decision, with at least three teams known to be
actively in pursuit – Golden State, New Orleans and Indiana. One source
says an unidentified fourth team remains in the mix.

Another source told ESPN.com that the Hornets and Warriors are
making the hardest push, but the Pacers have not been shy about their
need for another big man after using Troy Murphy’s expiring contract
last week to help facilitate the four-team traded that netted the point
guard Indy has long coveted in Darren Collison.

Indiana would probably be the best opportunity for Amundson to score some minutes, even if Golden State offers an intriguing stylistic fit. That said, I’d be curious to see how Amundson would fit in with what already seems to be a pretty crowded Golden State frontcourt (Brandan Wright, Andris Biedrins, Ekpe Udoh — though he’ll miss part of the season due to injury, Vladimir Radmanovic, David Lee, and Dan Gadzuric will all be fighting for minutes for the Dubs).

New Orleans is a bit of a wild card. If Chris Paul is locked in, Amundson could definitely help out the Hornets by filling in minutes at the 4 and the 5. However, Should New Orleans look to rebuild, Lou would be stuck behind David West and Emeka Okafor (and maybe even Craig Brackins or Darius Songaila, depending on NOLA’s depth chart) on a team going nowhere. Choose carefully, Lou.

WNBA team rehearses ring ceremony at practice of team it beat in Finals

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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The NBA does petty very, very, very, very, very, very, very well.

The WNBA is trying to give the NBA a run for its money.

The Minnesota Lynx and Los Angeles Sparks have met in the last two WNBA Finals, the Lynx winning last year and the Sparks winning the year before. Minnesota hosted Los Angeles in the season opener Sunday, and the Lynx unveiled their banner and presented players with rings.

Before that, while the Sparks were practicing in Minnesota, the Lynx played their video for the event.

Holly Rowe of ESPN:

The Sparks beat the Lynx on Sunday, but I don’t think that’s enough to override Minnesota’s power move.

Kobe Bryant on Kanye West’s comments: “What the hell are you talking about?”

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Kanye West, the President Trump backing hip-hop star, drew a lot of backlash for his comments on TMZ:

“When you hear about slavery for 400 years — for 400 years? That sounds like a choice. You were there for 400 years and it’s all of y’all. It’s like we’re mentally imprisoned.” 

Mentally, maybe in some cases. But more so physically, with guns and whips and attack dogs and a whole lot more weapons that were all on one side. Nobody chooses slavery.

Tuesday, Kobe Bryant surprised a group of about 300 high school students at WE RISE — a 10-day pop-up festival dedicated to sparking a movement for change in the mental health system — in Downtown Los Angeles. One of the students asked him about Kanye’s comments. Kobe is not down.

“I’m sure (I feel) the same way everybody else here in this room feels. What the hell are you talking about? I think that was my reaction as is everybody else’s reaction….

“The thing about our country is that you have the right to say whatever it is that you want to say…that’s the beautiful thing about living in a democracy. I think, for him, he’s one of these entertainers that’s always in a constant state of growth, he’s always challenging … himself, doing a lot of questioning internally himself…so I just take it for what it is and completely disagree.”

If I need to explain to you why Kobe is in the right here, you need to take a basic American history course again.

Good on Kobe for his comments. More importantly, good on Kobe for taking the time to promote mental health awareness.

“It’s easy for us as people to kind of ignore the emotional side of it,  especially when it comes to things that deal with negativity, things that deal with insecurity, things that deal with fear,” Kobe said. “It’s very easy to take the fear and just push it down, try to act like it doesn’t exist. The reason why it starts with imagination is because you first must imagine the life that you want to have. You must first imagine what it is you dream of becoming.”

Kobe did that, and now he’s got an Oscar. Oh, and a few basketball awards, too.

PBT Extra: LeBron, Cavaliers even series but Celtics far from dead

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If you want to make the case that the Cleveland Cavaliers are in the driver’s seat of the Eastern Conference Finals after sweeping two games at home, you’re in a good space. It’s a best-of-three and Cleveland has the best player on the planet on their side.

However, I still like the Celtics to hold on and win in seven.

I get into it in this PBT Extra, but the Celtics looked like a team that figured things out in the final three quarters of Game 4 (they just couldn’t make up for a disastrous first quarter), and they still have two games at home.

Either way, this feels like a series going the distance.

Did the Warriors deal Rockets a knockout blow in Western Conference finals?

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The Warriors beat the Rockets by 41 (!) in Game 3 of the Western Conference finals Sunday.

Biggest playoff win in Golden State franchise history.

Biggest playoff loss in Houston franchise history.

Biggest playoff loss ever handed to any team as good as the 65-17 Rockets.

“At the end of the day, it’s one win,” Warriors forward Draymond Green said. “It doesn’t matter if you win by 40 or if you win by one.”

Maybe it matters more than Green is letting on.

Golden State was the 17th team to -win a playoff game by more than 40 points. Of the previous 16, 15 – including the last 14 – won the series:

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The only exception came in my favorite playoff series of all-time, the best-of-three 1956 Western Division semifinals:

  • Game 1: St. Louis Hawks 116, Minneapolis Lakers 115
  • Game 2: Minneapolis Lakers 133, St. Louis Hawks 75
  • Game 3: St. Louis Hawks 116, Minneapolis Lakers 115

So, teams to win a playoff game by more than 40 are 15-0 in best-of-seven or best-of-five series. Will the Rockets buck the trend?

They can make adjustments. Maybe Houston’s strong regular season – better than any above blown-out team’s – indicates a rare capability to recover from this. Andre Iguodala‘s injury hurts Golden State. Teams sometimes make historic comebacks from blowouts, including against the Warriors.

But that Golden State ran toppled the Rockets so decisively in Game 3 suggests the Warriors are hitting a gear Houston won’t keep up with.