Beasley assures new GM Kahn he isn't smoking weed anymore

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Only two years after Michael Beasley was drafted with the 2nd overall pick in the 2009 NBA Draft, the Miami Heat had trouble giving him away. Eventually, the Heat managed to unload Beasley on the Minnesota Timberwolves, but they only got two second-round picks in exchange for the former Kansas State star. 
Why has Beasley been such a flop over his first two pro seasons? Is it because he’s a tweener, stuck between the three and the four? Is it because he’s never shown any particular interest in playing defense? Is it because he’s never extended his range to the NBA three-point line or committed himself to being a low-post player?
All of those are possible reasons why Beasley hasn’t lived up to his billing as a top-two pick yet. But for what it’s worth, Beasley’s new general manager thinks that the first step to Beasley’s turnaround has already been taken. 
In an interview with ESPN 1500 Twin Cities, David Kahn explained that Beasley’s marijuana habit  held him back in the early stage of his career. Beasley never formally admitted to smoking weed, but there was widespread speculation about his drug use after he was caught on film near marijuana not once but twice before he started his sophomore season. Now Beasley has assured Kahn that he doesn’t smoke anymore, which makes Kahn optimistic about Beasley’s future:
“He’s a very young and immature kid who smoked too much marijuana and has told me that he’s not smoking anymore, and I told him that I would trust him as long as that was the case,” Kahn said Thursday during an interview with 1500 ESPN Twin Cities.
“He has developed a really good support system around him this past season in Miami. He’s hired people to help him grow up. He is growing up — he’s not grown up. He’s 21 … and he just turned 21 last January, and if you think back, as I do all the time, to when I was 21 and if you had given me this kind of money and put me in this kind of world with these kinds of pressures attached to it and some of the demands, I don’t know (that) I would have handled it any easier than, say, he has.”

Kahn went on to say that Beasley had a “very issue-free” season in Miami, and that he felt that trading Beasley for two second-round draft picks was a risk well worth taking. Beasley’s immaturity certainly didn’t help him over the course of his first two years in the league; if he really has turned a new leaf off the court, perhaps he’ll start to live up to his potential on it. 

Michael Beasley reportedly joins Lakers on one-year contract

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Because a locker room with Lance Stephenson, JaVale McGee, and Rajon Rondo — with LaVar Ball circling around it — did not have enough distractions…

Michael Beasley, welcome to the Los Angeles Lakers.

It’s one year for $3.5 million.

Beasley is another eccentric guy for the Lakers’ collection. Remember when he changed teams from Minnesota to Phoenix and rather than move his stuff he just had a big estate sale and sold it all? Beasley by himself isn’t a distraction at this point, but all of those personalities in one locker room and… I do not envy Luke Walton right now.

Beasley had a solid offensive campaign for the Knicks last season, averaging 13.2 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.7 assists playing more than 22 minutes a night (he also started 30 games for them). He can attack off the dribble and score, gets to the line, and shot 39.5 percent from three — the man has embraced his role as a scorer off the bench and he can get the Lakers some buckets.

He’s also going to give up a lot of buckets because he does not play defense (he did rebound a little better last year, but that’s only when the guy missed despite his lack of D).

How Walton fits all this together remains to be seen. Beasley played 93 percent of his minutes last season at the four, where the Lakers will start Brandon Ingram but also rotate LeBron James and Kyle Kuzma through. Guys are versitle and basketball is evolving to being positionless, but that’s a lot of guys eating up minutes for similar roles.

At the price they are paying, this is a decent signing by the Lakers. Beasley will get them points if he stays healthy (he did play 74 games last season). I’m sure Magic/Pelinka will sell this as “adding another veteran playmaker to our roster,” and they will ignore all the baggage that comes with it. All those guys are on one-year contracts, the Lakers are looking farther down the road at much bigger targets than the new guys in the locker room.

But man, that Laker locker room this season is going to be a piece of work.

PBT Extra: Carmelo Anthony will be a Rocket, but will he accept new role?

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Carmelo Anthony will be a Houston Rocket soon.

How smoothly things go this season with him is another question entirely, something I get into a little in this latest PBT Extra. However, after a three-team trade involving Atlanta, Oklahoma City, and Philadelphia was agreed to in principle, it’s just a matter of time. Anthony is being traded to the Hawks, who will waive him, making him a free agent.

Then he signs with James Harden, Chris Paul, and the rest of the Rockets. Oklahoma City gets Dennis Schroder, another guy who will have to accept a new role. Philly adds some shooting. Watch the video above for a breakdown.

Dallas who? Yogi Ferrell reportedly quickly agrees to new contract with Sacramento

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Yogi Ferrell has been a solid backup point guard for the Mavericks the past couple of years, and this summer he wanted to re-sign with them — but he did so on a bad contract for him. He didn’t take the one-year qualifying offer for $2.9 million on the table, instead agreeing to a $2.5 million contract with a team option for $2.7 million the next year — he took less money and gave Dallas all the power.

Ferrell backed out of that deal — not a good look, even if it was the right move for him.

Quickly, he found a better one with the Sacramento Kings, reports Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports.

That’s more money, but we do not yet know if the second year is fully guaranteed.

In Sacramento, Ferrell will come off the bench behind De'Aaron Fox at the point, and he should get plenty of run. Guys like Buddy Hield will love playing with him, and Ferrell is not big, but he is durable (he played all 82 games last season in Dallas).

This is a solid signing by the Kings, and for Ferrell it appears to be a better deal.

Dallas has had more than one player back out of a deal with them. It’s unlucky.

New 76ers big Mike Muscala in February: I don’t like the 76ers because they, especially Joel Embiid, talk a lot of trash

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The 76ers are trading for the Hawks’ Mike Muscala, which makes sense on multiple levels.

1. Philadelphia wanted a stretch four after Nemanja Bjelica backed out of his deal.

2. Muscala, on an expiring contract, carries no long-term drawbacks.

3. Because Muscala can also play center, that allowed the 76ers to dump Richaun Holmes and clear a roster spot for Jonah Bolden.

But Muscala might have to answer for these February comments about Philadelphia and Joel Embiid.

Muscala on the Road Trippin’ podcast (hat tip: Jeff McMenamin):

I don’t like the Sixers.

I just don’t like them. I just feel like they talk a lot of s—, especially Embiid.

I understand there’s going to be some trash-talking. But I just feel like – I don’t know. Sometimes, I just – I respect players that just let their play do the talking. And I think sometimes, it just gets excessive, especially with Embiid.

I don’t think it’s a bad thing for the league. I think it’s entertaining, and I think people can feed off of that. In a weird way, I respect him for being to do that, because it takes a lot of guts and confidence, at the same time.

This is a deal, but it’s not necessarily a big deal. The NBA has a long history of players clashing as opponents then meshing as teammates.

The biggest difference here is Muscala’s comments were public.

Sometimes, it takes a conversation to clear the air. Occasionally, the grudge lingers. But usually, this is just dismissed as just the byproduct of competition and moved past.

I doubt Embiid – who, for what it’s worth, is an excessive trash-talker – holds this against Muscala, save maybe a few jokes. I’m even more confident Muscala isn’t joining Philadelphia loudly espousing his anti-trash-talk stance.

Besides, trash-talking is way more fun when on a winner like the 76ers rather than a loser like the Hawks.