NBA Summer League begins today in Orlando

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Here’s how you spot the hoops junkies (well, besides the kind of pasty skin tones): They’re the ones coming to this site, scanning past the latest LeBron James update to see what is happening in Summer League play.

Today is the hoop junkies dream — the Orlando Summer League kicks off play. Come Friday, the attention shifts from hot and humid Florida to the insanely hot Las Vegas for NBA Summer League. (And spare me the “it’s a dry heat crap, when it’s 100 degrees at 10 at night, it’s too [bleeping] hot.)

Summer League is about rookies and sleepers. We get to see the top draft picks in their first NBA action, how they handle a faster pace and more athletic defenders. We get to see what second rounders might stand out (Chase Budinger looked good at Summer League last year, and that translated to the season). It’s not ball at the NBA level (or even D-League, really) but it’s a step up from college.

We also get to see guys on the fringe of the NBA try to make a statement that they belong, guys who have played in Europe trying to show how their games have matured and are NBA ready now. Thing is, the real business of the Summer League is European scouts looking at American talent they want to sign — that is where the majority of the Summer League players end up.

You get to see all this in a very intimate setting. The beauty of Summer League is that the fans (and media) are very close to the action. It’s like watching NBA talent in a high school gym. NBA coaches and general managers are sitting in the stands. You can’t buy a Coke without bumping into a scout. And the whole thing is casual.

A few things to watch for in Orlando:

* Evan Turner and Derrick Favors squaring off Monday night. Two of the top three picks are in action. (John Wall debuts Sunday night in Vegas.)

* Butler’s Gordan Hawyward — is he really ready for this level of play?

* Can Darius Miles convince anyone that his knees are good for another run in the NBA?

* Can Rod Benson finally get a fair shake? The guy has NBA game. But he’s a blogger, and Internet sensation. Like any good blogger, he’s candid. It hasn’t helped. NBA front offices react like the Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer — they are frightened by your new technology. Will they see past it to the fact Benson can flat out ball?

* Mustafa Shakur got a look from the Oklahoma City Thunder and he looked good — an athletic, long player who can explode to the rim. Isn’t Oklahoma City’s roster filled with guys like that? He gets the chance to prove he belongs.

You can watch most of the games on NBATV.com. Also, for $14.05 you can stream all the games on your computer through NBA.com.

(Programming note: The entire ProBasketballTalk team will be in Las Vegas for Summer League. Why? Because we’re hoops junkies. Flat out junkies. We’ll bring you the highlights from Orlando, as well.)

Report: Lakers management still supporting Luke Walton as coach through rest of season

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Lakers president Magic Johnson said he wouldn’t fire Luke Walton during the season “unless something drastic happens, which it won’t.”

Does a 4-7 stretch (most of those games without LeBron James) qualify as drastic? Nope.

What about following that with a 2-2 stretching including an ugly loss to the Cavaliers? Apparently not.

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

Lakers management continues to project support for Walton publicly and privately — at least through this season, multiple sources told ESPN.

Walton might not be coaching to keep his job the rest of the season. But he’s almost certainly coaching to retain it for next season.

Johnson inherited, rather than hired, Walton. The new boss apparently hasn’t been impressed with his coach. As long as Johnson’s support seems so tepid and the Lakers keep losing, it will be worth continuing to evaluate Walton’s status.

LeBron getting healthy will go a long way. He can cover for this otherwise-deficient roster and make Walton look better.

But, in the meantime, Walton must avoid catastrophe to keep his job. So far, so good.

Report: Warriors project at least $100 million revenue increase with new arena next season

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The Warriors’ player costs this season are in line to be about $195 million (about $145 million in salary, about $50 million in luxury tax).

If they re-sign Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson to max salaries, keep everyone under contract, sign their own draft picks and fill the rest of their roster with minimum-salary free agents, the Warriors’ spending on players next season would project to hit about $355 million (about $173 million in salary, about $182 million in luxury tax).

But maybe Golden State can afford it.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

Internally, the Warriors project a nine-figure increase in revenue when they move into the Chase Center next season, sources said.

The Warriors already make so much money on their home games. That’s a whopping increase – one that could alone increase the league-wide salary cap a couple million dollars.

But this figure doesn’t say how much more money will reach Golden State ownership. Revenue differs from profit. The Warriors could have greater expenses, including revenue-sharing obligations, in their new arena.

Still, it’s hard to imagine this won’t be a windfall for the Golden State, one that could go a long way not just in affording stars but also keeping complementary players like Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston.

The salary cap promotes competitive balance. But big-spending teams still have an advantage.

2019 NBA All-Star jersey leaks

AP Photo/Chris Pizzello
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NBA All-Stars wore black and white uniforms last season, and it appears this year’s All-Star game will feature a similar look.

Josman Suri:

I love All-Star jerseys integrating a player’s NBA team, which comes more naturally now that All-Star teams are selected by captains rather than East vs. West.

But these are pretty bad. They look cheap and generic.

Perhaps, the red-white-and-blue borders are a nod to All-Star jerseys from 1991, when the game was last held in Charlotte:

AP_910210042

(AP Photo/Susan Regan)

If so, I appreciate the attempt to connect historically. But the link is pretty weak.

The Hornets have iconic colors in teal and purple. I’d rather see those integrated into the All-Star uniforms.

And I fear the white versions could look even worse. A black-and-white version of the Lakers’ looks too plain in the above photo. That version of a team’s logo could look even blander against white.

Dennis Schroder on trade from Hawks to Thunder: ‘I wanted to be in a winning-mentality organization. You just can’t go out there and try to lose’

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Dennis Schroder expressed his dismay last offseason with the Hawks’ losing.

Safe to say, the point guard was happy to be traded to the Thunder.

Schroder, via Erik Horne of The Oklahoman:

“I wanted to be in a winning mentality organization,” Schroder said bluntly, not the first time he’s brought up the different direction he had from the new Hawks, who are 13-30 entering Tuesday’s game. “You just can’t go out there and try to lose.

“I’m a competitor and I try to give everything out there. I want the organization to feel the same way. Right now with our organization, all the players in the locker room, all of the coaches, they’ve got a winning mentality. That’s what makes it fun, when you go out there and go to war with your brothers. There’s nothing better than that.”

Atlanta beat Oklahoma City by 16 last night, turning Schroder’s comments on their head. But that was only one game. Obviously, the Thunder are far better than the Hawks.

Atlanta is doing right by itself by rebuilding. But aggravating veterans should be a consequence of tanking. It’s a natural check on the practice.

Though Hawks players aren’t trying to lose when on the court, management built a team less-equipped to win now with the clear intent of landing a higher draft pick. It’s a miserable situations for veterans who are capable of contributing to a winner – which tends to make those veterans lose interest, which makes the team lose even more, which furthers management’s goals.

Schroder escaped that in Atlanta, maybe in part by complaining about his situation. I don’t blame him for continuing to call attention to the stark differences in philosophy between the Hawks and Thunder right now.