Why yes, Minnesota Timberwolves, Darko Milicic will gladly take your $20 million, please and thank you

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David Kahn is the most dangerous GM in the world. Not in the Sam Presti or Daryl Morey way, either; you don’t need to worry about his diabolical scheming or adaptable strategy, but rather how much irreparable damage he’s capable of doing to his team in a short time.

Well, add another bad move to Kahn’s Wikipedia page, even if it is merely bad (as opposed to completely ludicrous) and could actually have been far worse: the Timberwolves will sign Darko Milicic to a four-year, $20 million contract.

I’m glad that Kahn and Kurt Rambis understand that pairing Al Jefferson and Kevin Love together is a plan doomed to fail, but signing Darko to a long-term deal isn’t likely to make the situation any better. The Wolves have now betrayed themselves at the negotiating table; with Love as Kahn’s chosen son, Darko locked into a long-term deal, and the newly-signed power forward/center Nikola Pekovic on the way, it’s more evident than ever that the Wolves need to move Al Jefferson. He’s no longer a luxury, but an absolute redundancy, and that could seriously undercut Kahn’s attempts to trade him this summer.

If we view the Darko signing in a vacuum though, it’s really not awful. It’s just too long. And probably too expensive. If Kahn wanted to keep Milicic around while the team looks for more suitable centers, that’s fine. Sign him to a two-year deal starting around $4 million or so (which is still generous). If the Wolves don’t regret this signing immediately, they surely will four years down the line when they’re still paying Darko decent money for indecent production.

The good news is that the last year of Milicic’s contract is partially unguaranteed, so there’s always the possibility that the Wolves could be paying him slightly less in his final year to do absolutely nothing. Yay.

Far worse however, is the fact that signing him essentially forfeits the Wolves’ place in free agency, and removes the possibility of signing rumored target Rudy Gay. The pursuit of Gay may have been a mistake to begin with, but if given the choice between Minnesota spending too much money on an athletic wing with room for growth or a depressing center whose claim to fame is not being absolutely horrible, I think you take the former. Maybe that’s just me.

Either way, the Wolves will only have around $5 million in cap room to play with, no salary cap exceptions to speak of, and little hope for additional change outside of a potential Al Jefferson trade (which may be hindered by this very move). This signing in itself may not be a franchise-killer, but in conjunction with all of Kahn’s move in total, I think it’s time we Kahn-proof his office. Take his computer and phone, stash away all sharp objects, and lock him in. Believe it or not, it could actually get worse before the summer’s end.