The terrifying possibility of a LeBron-Wade-Bosh triumvirate in Miami inches closer to becoming a reality

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Thumbnail image for bosh_wade.jpgUPDATE 11:12 am: The Miami Herald and other sources are reporting that this summit did not happen in Miami. Turns out Wade spent last weekend in his hometown of Chicago. Although ESPN’s sources say they were all together in Miami.

Whatever. See, there is this fancy new technology called the telephone where the three of them could have had a conversation from wherever they were in the world. Amazing, I know. So to recap, a summit may have happened, but maybe not face-to-face one in Miami. And it may all not matter because they could talk any time they want.

10:24 am: Call it a summit, a book club, or whatever you’d like, but LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh have met to determine the league’s future over a nice game of Parcheesi. What an ominous yet delightful development!

The particular endgame the three are discussing is a future in which James, Wade, and Bosh all play for the Heat. Miami doesn’t have the cap space for such an unprecedented move as of yet, but they’ll continue trying to clear as much cap as possible to keep this dream alive. They just have to move Michael Beasley’s deal, and Pat Riley has been on the phones begging other GMs to do just that. Our own Ira Winderman reported he may have found a landing place, but nothing has been made official yet.

Reports have LeBron James as being the non-committed one to this idea. The man wants to be courted, he wants the teams to come to him and tell him how much they love him. Then he will decide, and Miami may now be a front runner. But first, he wants to be wooed.

The thought of the three biggest prizes of the 2010 free agent class all ending up in Miami is…frightening, to say the least. Supposing the Heat do end up moving Beasley, then Mario Chalmers and second round selections Dexter Pittman and Justin Varnado would be the only locks for the roster. The rest would need to be picked up using cap exceptions and minimum contracts. However, given the drawing power of the triumvirate, I’m sure a few capable veterans could be persuaded to sign for a discount.

If the three are to ever team up, it would require sacrifice. The price of converting three incredible, distinct talents into a supergroup would be substantial, particularly for their individual résumés. Initially, someone would have to sacrifice money; even if the Heat shed Beasley’s contract in order to have a realistic chance of signing all three free agents, they won’t have enough cap space for three max contracts.

Then, all three would likely have to sacrifice in usage. James, Wade, and Bosh are all high-usage superstars, and while their combined presence would open up easier scoring opportunities for all, it would also decrease their general frequency. It seems unlikely that any of the three players would be able to maintain their current statistical excellence if they were sharing a ball. Stats don’t mean everything, but they do factor into current evaluations of their game, All-NBA selections, Hall of Fame chances, and eventually help to determine their place among the all-time greats. After all, how often are numbers used for historical comparison, regardless of context?

If the thought of neo-Miami’s core is remarkable, it’s made even more so by the level of subjugation required to obtain it. This would be more than three superstars in their prime wanting to play together; James, Wade, and Bosh would all have to surrender their egos, their touches, their production, and their excuses at the door. If they fell short of an NBA title, there would be no wiggle room, as each would finally have at least two teammates worthy of their own impressive skills. That may not be an issue, though. The sheer force of James, Wade, and Bosh alone would incite an all-out panic across the league, and there’s a distinct possibility that they could rule the NBA with an iron fist.

But only if they decide that it’s really worth it. Only if they conclude that recognition of their work as a collective is enough to sustain them for the next few seasons. Only if three guys who have played up this summer’s market, promoted themselves, and been showered with attention suddenly determine that they don’t need all eyes on them and them alone. Only if they sacrifice the money, their places in the record books, and surely some individual awards along the way. Only then can we start reserving trophies for the new-and-improved hypothetical Miami Heat, the team that would somehow act as a caricature of the superstar system while defying it. 

Scottie Pippen on LeBron James, Michael Jordan: “It’s not a fair comparison”

AP
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The battle has, stupidly, raged on between supporters of Michael Jordan and LeBron James. Both sides seem to believe their preference is irrefutably the choice for the best player in NBA history.

And because they did not play in the same era, the question will never be answered. No doubt in 50 years they will write columns about Jordan vs. LeBron, just like their fathers, and their father’s fathers before them.

James has certainly seemed to take a bit of a leap in the eyes of the NBA community this season, likely because of his wonderful performance at age 33. He’s also single-handedly won two playoff series this year. It’s been incredible.

But LeBron rising above Jordan has also brought out some more reasonable takes. Former Chicago Bulls legend and Jordan running mate Scottie Pippen spoke up recently about the debate, giving a measured analysis that I think is pretty strong.

In short, Pippen basically said you can’t compare the two because of the eras, the style, and the fact they just don’t play the same position (if LeBron even has a position, that is).

Via Twitter:

That sounds right to me.

Cavaliers’ Kendrick Perkins not into “all that new stuff” like Chewbacca

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Chewbacca was at Game 3 in Cleveland Saturday. Sitting courtside.

Why? Because growing up on Kashyyyk he played a little hoop and admires LeBron James‘ skill? Because Drake gave him the tickets? Maybe. I mean, it’s not like that was just a clever little publicity stunt for a movie.

After the Cavaliers’ win, Kevin Love decided to make a little joke of it with noted humorist Kendrick Perkins, and it went over as well as expected (with Dave McMenamin of ESPN catching it).

That’s vintage Perkins.

Celtics’ Terry Rozier on Game 3: “We needed to get our butts whooped”

Associated Press
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Cleveland dominated Game 3 Saturday night. They played harder, to start. The Cavaliers’ defensive pressure on the ball was better, they were sharper rotating out to shooters and covering passing lanes. Cleveland’s role players stepped up and helped LeBron James.

Boston, meanwhile, wilted in the face of that pressure Saturday, something it has done a few times on the road these playoffs. The Celtics got away from the things that got them to the Eastern Conference Finals. Guard Terry Rozier put it more bluntly, via A. Sherrod Blakely of NBC Sports Boston:

“I feel like we needed this (loss) to get us back … to get us ready for Monday,” Rozier said.

Rozier later added, “We needed to get our butts whipped. Come back to reality and take care of business on Monday.”

Cleveland is a championship team — from LeBron James on down through the core guys, they all have rings. They have been down before, and heading home it was expected they would play with force. Cleveland’s back was against the wall and they responded.

From the Celtics’ perspective, they also got a little too fat and happy and were not ready for what the Cavaliers came with in Game 3.

Now the pressure is on Boston to push back, to get back to their level of execution and do it under pressure. Make the Cavaliers prove the improved defensive effort was not a one-off game. The Celtics must move the ball and play with some pace, then see if the Cavaliers can keep it together in the face of crisp play.

When this series heads back to Boston Wednesday, it will either see the Celtics in control up 3-1, or the series will be a best of three (with the Cavs still having to figure out if they can win on the road). At home, the Cavaliers are going to play with force again and have some depth. We’ll see if Game 3 was enough of a wakeup call for Boston.

PBT Extra: Can Rockets take Game 2 energy, execution on the road?

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Houston found its blueprint to beating Golden State in Game 2: Strong defensive pressure on the ball, quick switches and communication on defense, getting out in transition when possible, and starting sets earlier in the shot clock and attacking downhill with James Harden and Chris Paul.

Now can they do that on the road? Against a more focused and sharper Warriors’ team?

That will be the question in the next two games of the Western Conference Finals, and it’s what I discuss in this latest PBT Extra.