NBA finals Lakers Celtics Game 5: The Bynum paradox

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bynumpractice.jpgWith Andrew Bynum’s knee freshly drained and with his MRI showing no further damage, Phil Jackson expressed a desire for Bynum to play in Game 5. Bynum’s listed as questionable as even though the damage hasn’t increased, the amount of pain Bynum is in has. It’s one of those weird things with the human body. When the tear was getting increasingly worse, Bynum said he had little to no pain. But recently it’s been bothering him enough for him to be unable to play long minutes in the second half, even though there’s no increase in damage.

Frankly, it’s been amazing Bynum’s managed to play at all on it, let alone as well as he has. For a player whose work ethic and toughness has been questioned by everyone up to and including Tex Winter, it’s been a remarkable advance in his maturity. The question is, has Bynum reached the tipping point?

The Lakers are playing for an NBA championship. The highest prize they can obtain. This is the summit. There’s no guarantee that with Kobe getting older along with the rest of the Lakers’ core that they’ll be back here. It’s likely, of course, but not guaranteed, not like it was two years ago when Pau Gasol was first traded there. So there’s a certain amount of sense in the idea that Bynum should leave it all on the floor to collect as many rings as possible.

Beyond that, however, is the fact that Bynum is 22 years old. He’s got a whole career left in him. And playing on that knee is going to do further and further damage to him. With the advances in medical science, it’s probable that he’ll be able to bounce back completely and go back to having a stellar career. But this is his third knee injury in his short NBA lifespan. There’s just as good of a chance that the continued damage he’s doing by playing on it could shave years off his career, which could cost him significant money down the road. He’s got two to three contracts left in him to play, and essentially, he’s risking that to win his second ring.

It’s what we always ask of players, to value victory over the money, but is it really the right thing to do?

Maybe the tear is such that further damage to it and the resulting surgery won’t greatly impact his later career. Maybe Jackson is aware of it and trying to find a happy medium by playing him until it becomes too much and then yanking back on it as he did in Game 4. It’s obvious that the Lakers truly do need Bynum to beat the Celtics. It’s just such a dangerous game to be playing with the life of a kid that has so much left in him to give this game.

Ray Allen says he would’ve returned to Celtics if they signed Kevin Durant in 2016

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Ray Allen left the Celtics on bad terms in 2012. He finished his career with the Heat in 2014.

But Allen apparently could have come back with Boston in 2016… if Kevin Durant signed there first.

Allen, via Darren Hartwell of NBC Sports Boston:

“I had a conversation with (Ainge) and I told him this was my last-ditch effort. I would’ve went back,” Allen said on WEEI’s “Ordway, Merloni & Fauria” radio show.

“This was when Kevin Durant was a free agent. He was thinking about going to Boston. And I said, ‘Hey, if you guys land Kevin, I would certainly look at lacing them back up one more time and try to make something good happen here in Boston.’ “

This is a fascinating “what if?” – for the Celtics on the court and for Allen’s legacy in Boston.

But it also probably didn’t come close to happening. Durant said his top two choices in 2016 free agency were the Warriors and Thunder. Even Allen himself said he never neared a comeback.

Still, it’s interesting – after all the animosity – Allen even spoke to Celtics president Danny Ainge about returning.

European coach berates his players: ‘You’re good guys. F— you’ (video)

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Remember Luigi Datome? He spent a couple seasons with the Pistons and Celtics.

He makes an appearance in this wild video featuring Fenerbahce coach Zeljko Obradovic (warning: profanity):

A partial transcript the best I could muster:

YOU’RE GOOD GUYS. IN YOUR EYES, YOU’RE GOOD GUYS. F— YOU, EVERYBODY! F— YOU, OK!

F— YOU, GIGI DATOME. OK? SHAME ON YOU. AND YOU…

Festivus isn’t for another month, but someone is already ready for the airing of grievances.

Report: Rockets waiving Ryan Anderson

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To facilitate a trade from the Rockets to the Suns last summer, Ryan Anderson reduced the guarantee of his 2019-20 salary by $5,620,885. Anderson barely played in Phoenix, got traded to the Heat, barely played in Miami and got waived. He again signed with the Rockets this summer.

Now, after barely playing in Houston, Anderson will continue his odyssey elsewhere.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

Anderson was guaranteed $500,000 on his minimum-salary contract this season. By the time he clears waivers, he will have earned $434,704. So, assuming Anderson goes unclaimed, Houston will be on the hook for the remaining $65,296.

This might end the career of the 31-year-old Anderson. Once a premier stretch four, he no longer stands out in a league where 3-point shooting has become a common skill for power forwards. He’s also a major defensive liability.

Report: Doubts linger around Rockets about Tilman Fertitta-Daryl Morey fit

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Before Rockets general manager Daryl Morey’s tweet sparked an international geopolitical firestorm, it created a fissure in Houston. Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta quickly tweeted that Morey didn’t speak for the organization. It was a harsh public rebuke that led to major questions about Morey’s future in Houston.

Especially because there was already concern about the Fertitta-Morey relationship.

Kevin Arnovitz of ESPN:

Though a couple of NBA executives speculated Morey might have greater difficulty attracting marquee free agents to Houston, few said that his ability to perform his job would be affected beyond having to placate Fertitta, a shotgun marriage that sources close to the Rockets have considered a tenuous fit since Fertitta bought the team in 2017.

Morey has been operating like someone who doesn’t believe he’ll be in Houston long-term. Morey traded the Rockets’ last four first-round picks. He traded multiple distant-future first-round picks and took on significant future salary to upgrade from Chris Paul to Russell Westbrook. Morey also gave a three-year-guaranteed contract extension to a 30-year-old Eric Gordon.

To be fair, Morey has also been operating like someone whose team’s championship window is closing. That could also explain repeatedly mortgaging Houston’s future. It’s difficult to parse the difference.

But the costs incurred to contend now have veered toward paying later than paying now.

Morey has kept the Rockets out of the luxury tax – a detriment to their on-court ability, but a boon to Fertitta’s wallet. There’s no reason for Morey to operate this way if not directed by the owner. Yet, Fertitta has claimed the luxury tax didn’t influence roster decisions. That’s totally unbelieve, but if taken at face value, Fertitta was throwing Morey under the bus for downgrading Houston’s roster.

It’s easy to read between the lines and see a disconnect between Fertitta and Morey. This is only corroboration, and considering Arnovitz describes his sources as “close to the Rockets,” it’s particularly persuasive.

But Fertitta signed Morey to a five-year extension earlier this year. Fertitta also stood by Morey during the China-Hong Kong controversy, calling Morey the NBA’s best general manager. Whatever problems between the two, Fertitta continues empower Morey in significant ways.