NBA finals, Lakers Celtics: Hey look, Doc can nudge the refs in the press, too

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While there are plenty of coaches around the league that don’t quite enjoy the mandatory media relations part of the gig, Phil Jackson isn’t really one of them. Not only does Phil throw on a happy face for the media every once in awhile, but he, better than any coach in the league, understands how to use the media as a weapon.

The impact of Phil’s comments through the media have perhaps dulled a bit as his players, other players, and officials have grown wise to his act, but Jackson continues to poke and prod at various aspects of the game, from effort to officiating.

Doc Rivers is taking a page from his book after Game 3, when discussing Derek Fisher’s defense. From Kevin Ding of the OC Register:

“I thought he got away with a lot last night,” Rivers said. “I
thought there was a lot of holding going on and a lot of flopping going
on, and finally he showed that last one…But he’s good at it. He’s always been good at it. We knew that
going into the series. He’s one of the best charge-takers in the game.
He’s always been that. And some of them are charges and then some of
them are flops, but all of them are tough to call. It is a brutal call
to make. It really is a tough one.

“But as far as the off-the-ball action, single-double action, you
are not allowed to hold. You’re not allowed to bump, and you’re not
allowed to impede progress. I read that this morning, and I’m positive
of it. So you know, when that happens, then that has to be called.”

Rivers also again speculated about Lakers coach Phil Jackson’s
rather mild complaints about the officiating after Game 2 as having
swayed the calls in Game 3, saying Jackson’s commentary “carries weight.” Said Rivers about the results in Game 3: “It’s funny, I thought they
got away with more with all the moving screens. I didn’t think it was
all our fouls. I just think it was a ton of moving screens they got
away with.”

Doc’s perception of Phil’s influence makes these comments even more transparent. As usual, NBA coaches aren’t willingly trying to help us understand the nuances of the game, but rather use their media sessions as open lobbying to officials and the league office.