Mannix: Winter deserves Hall of Fame spot

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Even though Tex Winter’s career record as an NBA head coach is 51-78, he’s one of the true NBA coaching legends to emerge in the past couple of decades. When Winter took over as the coach of Marquette as a 29-year old in 1951, he was the youngest head coach in major college basketball. By the time he finished his stint as an assistant coach with the Lakers in 2004, the 82-year old Winter was one of basketball’s oldest coaches. 

After a wildly successful college coaching career and a two-year stint as head coach of the Rockets, Winter became an assistant coach in Chicago in 1985. After Phil Jackson was promoted to the head coaching spot in 1989, Winter and Jackson became an unstoppable pair for the better part of the next two decades. Winter taught the Triangle (or triple-post) offense that he’d developed when he was coaching in college to Jackson and the rest of the Bulls. 
The results were and are legendary. Six championships in eight seasons with the Bulls, including two separate three-peats. Another three-peat with the Lakers, bringing Winter’s total of NBA championships to nine. (Winter got a ring for his other thumb when the Lakers voted to give him a ring after their 2009 championship.)
Winter was never the center of attention over the course of his NBA coaching career. All he did was construct the offense that won 10 NBA championships and helped make Phil Jackson the most revered NBA head coach since Red Auerbach. Personally, I think that’s enough to get Winter an admission to the NBA Hall of Fame, and so does Chris Mannix of Sports Illustrated:
There is one honor that continues to elude the man credited as the innovator of the triangle offense: A spot in the Naismith Hall of Fame.
The case against Winter’s election has always been odd, boiling down to the argument that Winter’s greatest impact on the game came not as a player or head coach, but as an assistant, first with the Bulls and later with the Lakers. But even as Hall of Fame voters keep him out, Winter’s peers continue to lobby for him to get in. Michael Jordan singled Winter out during his acceptance speech last year and former Bulls GM Jerry Krause resigned from the Hall of Fame committee because Winter’s name wasn’t on the ballot one year and has sworn never to attend another Hall ceremony until Winter is enshrined…
…At 88, Winter’s coaching career is behind him. His imprint on the game is indelible, but his days on the sideline are probably over. Before the memory of his accomplishments fade, the Hall should rectify one of its most glaring errors.
They should let Tex in.

Tex Winter helped Phil Jackson win 10 championships. He was a big reason that the great Jerry Sloan is still looking for his first championship. Both of those coaches, as well as countless other coaches who had no answer for Winter’s triple-post offense, are or will be Hall of Fame members in time. So are the players who became legends by perfectly running the triangle year after year. If you ask any of those players or coaches, I’m sure they’d put Winter in the Hall in the blink of an eye. It’s time for the Hall voters to recognize that there’s a reason Winter deserves that kind of respect. 

Mike D’Antoni on Rockets’ defense: “I don’t see it like falling so far off. I don’t see it.”

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Last season the Houston Rockets’ defense allowed 105.7 points per 100 possessions, seventh best in the NBA. After the All-Star break they allowed just 103.8 per 100, fourth best during that stretch. By the end of the season, the Rockets switched every screen on- and off-ball (something they felt they needed to handle the Warriors in the playoffs) and leaned on defensive minded role players such as Trevor Ariza and Luc Mbah a Moute. It got them within a game — within a half, really, the Rockets led at half of Games 6 and 7 vs the Warriors — of reaching the NBA Finals and almost certainly bringing home a title.

This season, the conventional wisdom was the Rockets would take a big step back defensively. Ariza and Mbah a Moute left as free agents, replaced on some level by James Ennis (a quality defender), Carmelo Anthony (not so much) and Michael Carter-Williams. Defensive-focused assistant coach Jeff Bzdelik retired, adding to the losses.

That narrative was fed opening night when Anthony Davis did whatever he wanted on his way to 32 points, Elfird Payton (yes, Elfrid Payton) put up a triple-double, and the Pelicans scored at a 124.8 points per 100 pace in blowing the Rockets out.

Mike D’Antoni doesn’t see the season going that way. Speaking to  Sam Amick of The Athletic he defended the team’s defense this season.

I think we’re even deeper this year, so we can have fresher guys on the floor… Trevor and Mbah a Moute were big parts of (Houston’s switching defense), but it’ll be taken up by Michael Carter-Williams. He’s a very good defensive player. James Ennis, who has energy and can play defense, and has all kinds of energy, to Eric Gordon, who will play with Chris and James a little bit more. So I don’t see it like falling so far off. I don’t see it. ‘Melo and the guys are smart enough (to know that) by switching it helps them too. They don’t have to fight through screens and all that. We’re just switching everything to try to keep guys in front. We have a nice philosophy, I think, where players understand what we’re trying to do.

The only thing that’s really changed is that (assistant coach) Roy (Rogers) has the (defensive) voice, in film sessions, talking to them, and (former assistant) Jeff (Bzdelik) had the voice (last season, before unexpectedly leaving during the summer). We all sat down to figure out what we wanted to do defensively, what were the best matchups, talking to Chris and James and PJ about, ‘OK, who you guarding tonight, and what do you think?’ And they’ll figure it out. But at the end of the day, the information still flows exactly the same.”

While the system may be the same, the players executing it are not. Carter-Williams was just lost and a mess defensively in the opener. Anthony will be better than some think as a team defender during the regular season (not good, but not a complete dumpster fire), but he can be exploited in a playoff series (Utah hunted him out in the first round last season, and it worked). P.J. Tucker is a fantastic defender, as is Chris Paul, but both are a year older and not getting faster.

Opening night was an aberration — the Rockets are not that bad on either end of the floor. It’s just one game and every team will have a few clunkers over the course of 82. The Rockets will play better against the Lakers in LeBron James‘ home opener Saturday night (that will not be an easy game for Houston by any measure).

Right now it feels like the Rockets are headed for a step back defensively this season, and with that their margins against the Warriors get even smaller. We’ll see over time if D’Antoni knows best.

Russell Westbrook out vs. Clippers Friday night, second game he’s missed

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The Thunder offense struggled on opening night, scoring less than a point per possession (96.2 per 100 possessions, to be specific). While the Thunder got out and ran a decent amount, 18.6 percent of their possessions started in transition, they scored just 0.88 points per possession on those chances (stats via Cleaning the Glass). On spot-up jump shots, they shot scored just 0.67 points per possession (via Synergy Sports) and they shot 27.8 percent from three in the part of the game that mattered.

How much of that was the Thunder offense missing their engine in Russell Westbrook, and how much of that was going against the solid defense and length of the Golden State Warriors?

We may find out Friday night because Westbrook is out again, still recovering from arthroscopic surgery on right knee back on Sept. 12. Royce Young of ESPN broke the news.

That means again most of the offense will flow through Paul George, which worked reasonably well but he needs more help from other players. The Clippers’ defense was fairly good opening night, and they played Denver close, but couldn’t score enough and lost a lead down the stretch, dropping their season opener.

What really matters is this gives us another chance to watch Westbrook try to sneak-snack on the bench.

LeBron James: Team chemistry not “like instant oatmeal. It is not that fast.”

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We shouldn’t overreact to the opening night loss for the Lakers in Portland, there were a lot of things in there we should have expected. First, Portland is a superb team led by two All-Stars that is always tough at home. The  Moda Center is never an easy place to win for any team. Second, the shooting woes the Lakers had were too be expected when we looked at the roster, and while it’s going to be a lingering problem all season they will have better nights than 7-of-30 from three and 0-of-7 from the corners.

However, the biggest takeaway is this: The Lakers lacked continuity and chemistry, and in a one-point game in the fourth (101-100) that really started to show, while the Trail Blazers are primarily the same team running primarily the same system, and their chemistry fueled the win.

That also shouldn’t be a surprise. So LeBron James, how long is it going to take for the Lakers to find that chemistry? (As reported by Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPN).

“Um, not as fast as you guys think it’s going to happen,” James said when asked how long it will take for the Lakers’ chemistry to develop. “I always kind of compare it to like instant oatmeal. It is not that fast. It takes a while to get to where you can close your eyes and know exactly where your guys are.”

LeBron has history on his side here. Both when he went to Miami to join Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, and when he returned to Cleveland, his teams got off to slow starts as they figured out their team chemistry. It takes player a while to adjust to playing with LeBron — who was working hard to set his Laker teammates Thursday rather than just taking over — and for him to adjust to them. Both those Cleveland and Miami teams went on to the NBA Finals.

The difference is this is the West and there is almost no margin for error, and early struggles could cost the Lakers’ playoff seeding. Or more.

Shirtless man berates Bulls center Cristiano Felicio on Philadelphia street: ‘You ain’t no Michael Jordan’

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Cristiano Felicio didn’t play in the Bulls’ loss to the 76ers last night.

But the center made an appearance in Philadelphia.

Josh Haber:

Plenty of well-articulated points here that are worth thoughtfully considering.