LeBron James only steals the show if you let him

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James_solo.jpgThere’s little doubt that July will belong to LeBron James. Regardless of whether he stays or goes, the endless speculation concerning his future, his decision-making, and his rationale will be put under the world’s largest internet-powered microscope, and every other sports-related topic will be put on the back-burner. That’s just what happens when the biggest name in basketball becomes an unrestricted free agent after promoting the event years in advance.

If James manages to upstage the finals, though, there’s no one to blame but ourselves. Lakers-Celtics seems set to be a truly special series, and while there’s obviously enough online real estate to cover this, that, and all other stories, emphasis is dictated by media members and media consumers. If the idea of LeBron stepping in front of the spotlight is really all that irking, why not exercise the right to just ignore it? Or at least circumvent it?

It’s not as if James holds some magical power over the nation’s attention span. His name in glittering lights piques the interest of the adoring masses, but there’s always a choice. Every time there’s a half-time show on LeBron’s future, the remote is in your hands. Every time there’s a headline about LeBron the free agent, there’s a decision on whether or not to click it. Maybe James is trying to stay on the tip of everyone’s tongue or maybe he’s not, but it doesn’t happen without our consent. It’s me, you, and everyone we know allowing LeBron into our homes, our cable boxes, and our browsers.

For basketball fans, the actual basketball will prevail. The two best teams in the league (and they are just that) with the two best playoff performers are about to slug it out over seven games, and if LeBron is really living in the limelight, it represents our own laziness as much as it does his self-obsession. How is Kevin Garnett going to defend Pau Gasol? Should Kobe Bryant guard Rajon Rondo? Will the Boston bench be able to withstand their toughest competition yet? There are countless stories and angles in this single series, and innumerable items of interest to grab our attention should we allow them to.

I’m not saying that other stories won’t pop up over the course of this series, or that they shouldn’t be given their due. Just that as free-thinking consumers, the point in complaining over what we have the right to choose is useless. Yes, LeBron wants attention; that much has been clear ever since his promotion of 2010 free agency began. I’m sure a lot of NBA players want the same, whether they’re playing in the finals or not.

We control whether he gets that attention, and we control our own response to it. If you don’t care about LeBron’s tell-nothing interviews, then don’t care. If you don’t want to hear about him during the finals, then don’t talk or write about him. And if you’re tired of him craving attention, then stop feeding it to him. LeBron may have the ability to create headlines, but it’s the consumers that determine their prominence and placement. James may be the star, but NBA fans have all the power.