William Wesley, the most powerful man you don't know

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wwesley.jpgThe rumors are LeBron James and John Calipari are being packaged as a pair. Packaged by William Wesley, a man usually just described as an NBA power broker. Wesley works for CAA and is very tight with both men. But you can bet that wherever LeBron James lands, whoever his coach will be, when James is at the podium for the press conference, William Wesley will be in the room, hanging out on the side. And Wesley will have influenced the decision.

It’s left a lot of people with one simple question: Who is William Wesley.

Except, that is not a simple question. It is a mix of myth and reality, and it is a question nobody has any real answer for. Henry Abbott at TrueHoop has done an ongoing investigation over a number of years. Alex French’s piece for GQ in 2007 may be the best single story on the man. And yet you are left feeling all of what has been written is just the part of the iceberg above the water that you can see. That 90 percent of it is hidden from view.

In the NBA, talent is the ultimate commodity. Teams need it to win. Shoe companies need it to sell shoes. Agents need it to get the big contracts (and more clients). If someone has the ear of talented players, if someone has their trust, that person has a lot of power.

William Wesley has a lot of trust. Probably more than anyone around the league. That makes him one of the ultimate power brokers.

Wesley is like the Zelig of the NBA, he is everywhere, influencing everything. He was holding back Ron Artest at the Malice in the Palace. Wesley is tight with Michael Jordan — he was the one who introduced LeBron to MJ, all part of the effort to recruit him to Nike. (Wesley also helped guide James to his agent, Leon Rose.) At any given time Wesley will be sitting next to Jay-Z at a Nets game (the two are tight) or hugging Jerry Jones after a Cowboys victory (the two are tight). The man gets friendly hellos from David Stern. He has access to Team USA basketball practices. He helped guide the last two coaching searches for Cleveland.

It was now ESPN analyst Jalen Rose who nicknamed him World Wide Wes — a play on the Internet’s www prefixes and its ability to find and connect you to anything.

Yet until he signed with CAA earlier this year, he had no formal ties. Wesley was the ultimate free agent.

What Wesley does, apparently better than anyone around, is form relationships. He knows everyone. Everywhere. The GQ piece tells the story of Wes getting Jay-Z on the phone for a young Leandro Barbosa in seconds. He can get Allen Iverson, Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony, just about anybody on the phone instantly. He befriends players at the AAU level — the traveling club teams for top high school players — and helps guide their careers.

It works because people trust him. He calls the players he works with his family, and he treats them like the father that everyone wishes they had. There are the perks — he can hook them up with anything. A guy who can make custom suits. The right dentist. A hair stylist. Whatever you need, Wesley knows the right person. Not just can look up, but knows them.

His advice is trusted because it is seen as wise and fair, looking out for the best interest of the player and not just telling him what he wants to hear.

ESPN’s “Sports Guy” columnist Bill Simmons tells the story of a bunch of people out with a young player late one night on All-Star weekend. It’s late but the player wants to keep going, to find some after hours spots, and it is Wesley who stops it. “You can’t chase the night. When the night is over, the night is over. That’s just the way it is,” Wesley says. The crew breaks up and goes home almost instantly. Members of a player’s posse, his high school buddies still clinging on, would have pushed on into that night. Wesley got the player to do the right thing. It’s just an example, he doesn’t offer advice just in his own interest, but in the interest of the players.

Players trust him because of that and because Wesley never asks them for anything. Ever. Not a dinner, not a pair of shoes, not tickets. Nothing. He is there to help. He guides. But he has those connections. If a player wants to talk to people at Nike, Wes can make that happen for him. If there is a deal to be made, the agent or the company may give Wes a piece of the action for steering the player to them. It’s a small price to pay for the connection. Like bringing LeBron to Nike. Or Rose.

The problem in telling the William Wesley story is separating the man from the myth, the truth from the legend. In NBA circles he is a legend.  Yet nobody can easily explain what he does or how he does it. Which is part of his mystique, his attraction, his power. By accounts from people I have spoken with, Wesley is a nice guy, a good guy. People like him, they trust him. They often listen to him.

And in the NBA, that is real power.

Watch all of LeBron James’ 46 points in Game 6

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There is going to be a Game 7 in the Eastern Conference Finals Sunday because of LeBron James.

George Hill had a strong game (20 points), Jeff Green and Larry Nance Jr. had their moments, but it was all about LeBron — 46 points, 11 rebounds, and 9 assists in 46 brilliant minutes.

Rather than try to describe his game to you — including the dagger threes late — just watch.

And enjoy. There are still some people out there (mostly on Twitter, it seems) who just want to tear LeBron down for some reason. I pity them. Not just because they are wrong, although they are. Rather, it’s because they are depriving themselves of enjoying one of the greatest players ever to lace them up. LeBron can bully people in the paint, hit step back threes, is as gifted a passer as the game has seen, and just plays a smart, high-IQ game we have got to watch grow over the years. If you can’t enjoy that, you don’t love basketball.

LeBron James is a force nature, scores 46, wills Cavaliers to win forcing Game 7

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What more can be said about the brilliance of LeBron James?

We can point to his 46 points, 11 rebounds, and nine assists Friday night in a win-or-go-fishing elimination game. We can point to how he lifted the team up when Kevin Love went down after a blow to the head (more on that later). We could talk about how this is his seventh 40+ point game of the playoffs, the last guy to do that since Michael Jordan in 1989 (when Jordan was 25 and had yet to win a title).

Or, we can just show you his back-to-back dagger threes in the fourth quarter over Jayson Tatum.

That is art on a basketball court.

LeBron got a little help Friday night at home, and with that the Cavaliers won Game 6 109-99, forcing a Game 7 back in Boston on Sunday night.

“It feels good just to play for another game, and like I’ve always said ‘Game 7’ is the best two words in sports,” LeBron said. “And for us to be on the road in a hostile environment where we have had no success up to this point, we should relish the opportunity and have fun with it.”

LeBron was nothing short of brilliant (remember 10-12 years ago people were trying to say he was afraid of the big moment, damn that sounds silly now). He is historically brilliant in Game 7s, but he can’t do it alone.

George Hill, the second best shot creator on the team, had 20 points on 7-of-12 shooting. Jeff Green had 14 off the bench, and Larry Nance Jr. had a timely 10 points and 7 rebounds.

Nance’s play was crucial because Kevin Love went down 5 minutes into the game after banging heads with Jayson Tatum while setting a screen.

Love’s was being checked for a concussion and his status for Game 7 is not known. (If he does have a concussion, it’s unlikely he clears the league protocol in time to play in two days.)

Despite LeBron and all of it, the Celtics had their chances in this one.

Boston got off to a fast start because Jaylen Brown had 15 first-quarter points and the Celtics shot 61 percent as a team, none of which seemed sustainable but it got them out to a 25-20 lead after one. Then the Cavaliers came on in the second with a 20-4 run behind LeBron, and once they had the lead the Cavaliers never let it go.

Boston will look back on not grabbing rebounds — Cleveland grabbed the offensive rebound on 36.6 percent of their missed shots, a very high percentage — and the fact the Celtics missed nine free throws and think things could have been different.

Boston is going home, where they are 10-0 these playoffs and for some reason inexplicable even to Brad Stevens, they play much better. The Celtics have a great defense, smart players, and a real chance.

The Cleveland Cavaliers have LeBron James. That may be enough.

“We have one more game to be able to compete for a championship, what more can you ask for?” LeBron said.

Kevin Love being evaluated for concussion, out for second half

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It happened just five minutes into the game — Cleveland’s Kevin Love and Boston’s Jayson Tatum banged heads.

Love was in the midpost and part of his job was to set a screen for George Hill, who was racing out to the arc. In doing so, Love and Tatum banged heads and it wasn’t pretty.

Love spent a few minutes on the ground, went straight to the locker room, and has not returned to the game.

Tatum did not leave the game.

There still is no official word on if Love has a concussion. If he does, he will go into the league’s mandated concussion protocol — which means to be cleared he has to be symptom free through a series of physical tests — and it would be a challenge for him to be back for a Game 7, if there is one.

And their likely will be one. After struggling in the rest of the first quarter without Love, the Cavaliers have gotten solid performances out of Hill, Jeff Green, and of course, LeBron James has been brilliant. The Cavaliers have a comfortable 15-point lead late in the third quarter.

NBA Finals schedule drops, Game 1 Thursday, May 31

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We don’t know where the NBA Finals will be played, but we know when.

Next Thursday the eyes of the NBA world could be focused on Oakland or Houston, and the following Wednesday that may shift to Boston or Cleveland. All four of those teams still have a chance to make the NBA Finals.

What we know is the dates for the games. Here is the schedule:

Game 1, Thursday, May 31, at 9 p.m. ET: Boston Celtics/Cleveland Cavaliers at Houston Rockets/Golden State Warriors

Game 2, Sunday, June 3, at 8 p.m. ET: Boston Celtics/Cleveland Cavaliers at Houston Rockets/Golden State Warriors

Game 3, Wednesday, June 6, at 9 p.m. ET: Houston Rockets/Golden State Warriors at Boston Celtics/Cleveland Cavaliers

Game 4, Friday, June 8, at 9 p.m. ET: Houston Rockets/Golden State Warriors at Boston Celtics/Cleveland Cavaliers

Game 5, Monday, June 11, at 9 p.m. ET: Boston Celtics/Cleveland Cavaliers at Houston Rockets/Golden State Warriors

Game 6, Thursday, June 14, at 9 p.m. ET: Houston Rockets/Golden State Warriors at Boston Celtics/Cleveland Cavaliers

Game 7, Sunday, June 17, at 8 p.m. ET: Boston Celtics/Cleveland Cavaliers at Houston Rockets/Golden State Warriors

Games 5, 6, and 7 are if necessary. All games will be broadcast on ABC.

There were no surprises here. The date of the start of the NBA Finals has been set since before the season started (it always is, to help broadcast partners and international media plan). The game pattern follows the same as last year, when the NBA changed it to make sure there was at least one day off in addition to travel days when the venue switches cities.