NBA draft lottery: Evan Turner is quite the consolation prize

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eturner.jpgOne very happy team is going to walk away with John Wall in their pocket tonight. All eyes will be on the franchise that drafts the fantastic Kentucky point guard, as Wall’s brilliance and style have always demanded that all eyes are on him.

Another team, however, will be quietly snickering in the wings, as they put themselves in position to select Evan Turner in this year’s draft.

Turner may not step into the league with Wall’s star power, but he’s the more polished overall talent at this point in their careers. Neither John nor Evan has a game with really glaring weaknesses (hence the projection for them to go first and second in the draft, respectively), which makes the decision between them reliant on a few marginal factors: age (Wall is 19 to Turner’s 21), draw (even if Turner turns out All-NBA, Wall is All-Star), and difference in expected peak (Turner could be excellent, but Wall could be a transformational talent). Do those things matter? Hell yeah they do, and they’re significant enough for Wall to be the consensus top pick rather than just a chic selection.

The team that drafts John Wall won’t live to regret it, but the team that ends up with Evan Turner could be just as thrilled. Turner’s versatility will make him a star in the NBA for a long time, and he has enough natural talent to become a terrific player. The comparisons to Brandon Roy are understandable; Turner’s athleticism isn’t off-the-charts, but he can act as the creator in an offense, score with the best of him, and works hard defensively. Turner’s actually likely to be a better NBA defender than Roy, but with a similar ability to establish his team’s offensive flow.

He’s not John Wall, but some of the teams in the lottery don’t necessarily need a John Wall. They could sure as hell use an Evan Turner, though. The best thing that could happen for the Minnesota Timberwolves, for example, may be to fall into the No. 2 pick rather than #1.

Don’t get me wrong, Wall could be just the player Minny needs to jump-start the real rebuild, even if he seems like a strange fit with Kevin Love and Al Jefferson. Turner however, while perhaps less talented than Wall, seems to be a far more natural addition for a shooting guard-deprived roster.

I just don’t trust David Kahn to make the right call. Turning down John Wall would be a damn hard decision for any GM, but with one who gets a bit batty when he sees the letters “PG” anywhere on his draft board, there’s no chance at all that Turner could be taken with the top pick. That’s why the second pick in the draft could suit the Wolves just fine, as they add a top-flight 2-guard that can not only improve their team on both sides of the ball, but is an ideal facilitating scorer for the triangle offense.

It’s unclear exactly how long Kahn will stick with the triangle or with Kurt Rambis for that matter, especially considering how much emphasis he’s put on acquiring point guards that work best in a less structured offense. Should the system persist though, Turner would be fantastic at providing scoring without stopping the team’s ball movement.

Minnesota is just one situation that would greatly benefit from the addition of Turner, but in reality there really aren’t teams out there that couldn’t use a player this good. Wall may receive all the hype, but Turner’s skill set, style, and production all point to him being a fantastic pro.      

Zion Williamson’s sprained knee became bad day for Nike

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When presumptive No. 1 pick Zion Williamson went to the ground, his knee twisting, early in Duke’s game against North Carolina Wednesday night, the basketball world collectively gasped.

Former President Barack Obama was there and quickly recognized the problem:

It did, unquestionably. The  6-foot-7, 284 pound Williamson was wearing the  PG 2.5 PEs (the Paul George signature line of Nikes), and when he made a hard cut the shoe gave out and Williamson went to the ground in a heap. The television cameras closed in on the busted Nike.

That’s not good press.

Fortunately, Williams suffered only a mild, Grade 1 knee sprain, and is day-to-day.

Nike released a statement to multiple media outlets that said, “We are obviously concerned and want to wish Zion a speedy recovery. The quality and performance of our products are of utmost importance. While this is an isolated occurrence, we are working to identify the issue.”

Nike stock dropped one percent on Thursday, although that level of fluctuation is not serious.

Bottom line, if this remains an isolated incident, Nike’s reputation — and position as the dominant force in basketball shoes — is not in danger. Fans and players will forgive one random incident. Have it happen again to a high-profile player and… Nike doesn’t want to find out.

 

Marcus Smart on today’s NBA: “Everything’s become real cute… Everybody’s scared to get hit”

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“I think it’s wonderful what we’re seeing in the league right now, some of the rules changes we’ve made in the last few years that really focus on skill-based playing. I’d like to think that young people around the world are able to look at this game and say, I can be as great as my desire to dedicate myself to this game, especially when it comes to shooting and ball handling. I get it, you can’t dream about being seven feet tall, but you can dream about having ball-handling skills like Steph Curry.”

That was NBA Commissioner Adam Silver All-Star weekend in Charlotte, and television ratings and overall interest in the league back him up — NBA ratings have been largely rising for years, both on the local and national level. Fans seem to gravitate towards fast-paced, entertaining teams and games.

But not everybody loves it. Charles Barkley can lead the “get off my lawn crowd.” However, there is a role for throwback players in the game. Guys who would have thrived in the 1990s, or the 1960s. Boston’s Marcus Smart is one of those guys — he told Mirin Fader of Bleacher Report he wishes there was more physicality in the league.

“Back in the ’60s, ’70s, my mindset and the way I play would be perfect. They play like that every game,” Smart says…

“That’s just what it is! Exactly!” he says, a smile breaking through. “I think we kind of lost that in today’s game. Everything’s become real cute. Everybody’s scared to go to the rim. Everybody’s scared to get hit. Everybody’s scared to touch.

“I thrive on the contact. Contact is in my nature.”

The NBA has always had to strike a balance between physicality and allowing skill to flourish. Right now the pendulum has swung well over to the skill side, and some fans romantically recall 1990s basketball when the pendulum was on the other side. They think of Michael Jordan or Allen Iverson and remember the era fondly through the haze of time. Of course, what that time obscured were the slogs of games with scoring in the 80s and maybe 90s, they forget how hard it could be to watch Mike Fratello’s Cavaliers clutch and grab their way to a slow, tedious, and coach-controlled four quarters. The 90s were not filled with the beautiful game.

But in any era, a guy like Smart has real value because he’s a good basketball player. Plain and simple. Just one who would like to be allowed to be a little more physical.

 

76ers coach Brett Brown: Markelle Fultz didn’t mean to insult Philadelphia coaches

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After getting traded from the 76ers to the Magic, Markelle Fultz said, “It just excites me really to know that I have coaches that’s going to push you to be better and not just going to tell you what you want to hear.”

I don’t know whether Fultz intended that to sound like a shot at Philadelphia coach Brett Brown. But it sounded like a shot at Philadelphia coach Brett Brown.

Keith Pompey of The Inquirer:

Brown said Fultz “didn’t mean that.”He said the two have spoken back and forth.

“He’s a good kid,” he said. “He’s a good young man, and, truly, we wish him well.”

I’d prefer to hear that directly from Fultz. But I doubt he’ll do any more interviews this season until he plays again – and who knows when that will be?

Still, it can be difficult for a player to compliment his new team without sounding like he’s admonishing his old team. There was always a good chance that’s all that happened with Fultz. Brown’s explanation makes that even more likely.

Report: NBA formally submits proposal to lower draft age to 18, end one-and-done

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It’s coincidental this happened the day after Duke star and likely No. 1 pick Zion Williamson sprained a knee in a much-hyped, nationally televised game. This is been in the works for a while and is now becoming realty:

The NBA formally submitted a proposal to the National Basketball Players Association (the players’ union) to lower the draft age from 19 to 18. Meaning players could be drafted to the league straight out of high school. While that will not come until likely 2022, the formal proposal starts the project, reports Jeff Zillgitt of the USA Today.

The NBA has submitted to the National Basketball Players Association a formal proposal that will lower the draft-eligible age to 18 from 19, a person with knowledge of the proposal told USA TODAY Sports…

The league and union have had informal discussions about lowering the age limit, and NBA commissioner Adam Silver is on record saying the current 19-year-old age limit is not working for the league or college basketball.

This is the first step in formal negotiations to lower the age limit by the 2022 draft. The issue is collectively bargained between the NBA and NBPA, and both sides need to agree to any rule change.

There have been sticking points during those informal discussions between the sides. Specifically, the league wants to require that agents provide every team with full medical reports on players, and the league wants players to be forced to participate in some level of the NBA Draft Combine. As of now, agents often withhold medical info from teams they don’t want to draft their players (that doesn’t always work) and elite players often do little more than get measured at the combine. It’s a fight over information and the sides will need to find a compromise.

Silver had told reporters over the summer that the NCAA’s own report from Condoleezza Rice’s Commission On College Basketball called for an end to one-and-dones, and that has motivated him to end the practice. However, to give teams ample time to gear up scouting and get development programs in place, nothing will happen before the 2022 draft.

This has been a long time coming, the one-and-done rule is a compromise neither the NBA or colleges liked much, and it has made players resentful. What exactly the process will look like on the other side remains to be seen, but it should be better than the mess we see right now.