NBA Playoffs: Bulls fight valiantly, but the Cavs are still the Cavs

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rose and noah game 5.pngThe Chicago Bulls were neither deep enough nor talented enough to pose much of a threat to the Cleveland Cavaliers, but they competed. They worked defensively and made things as difficult as they could for LeBron and co., but facing an opponent with so many scoring options and such chemistry ultimately proved to be too much.

Expecting Chicago to be a significant obstacle would be somewhat misguided, given how many of their possessions end in bad shots and how heavily the Bulls are forced to lean on their starting five. Chicago got just 32 total minutes out of their reserves, and those three players totaled 10 points (on 4-of-11 shooting), six rebounds, and two assists. Oh, and their names are Brad Miller, Flip Murray, and Hakim Warrick. Not exactly a Sixth Man candidate among them, and no sure-fire contributions lest you count Flip’s tendency to take over the scoring load for stretches.

By comparison, Cleveland’s reserves score 28 points (11-of-22), grabbed 11 boards, and notched five assists in about 78 total minutes. To make matters worse, that’s without tapping Zydrunas Ilgauskas, Leon Powe, or Daniel Gibson for minutes. The Cavaliers are a veritable army, and their ability to play a number of different lineups with varied strengths is tough for almost any team to counter. Factor in LeBron James as a big part of most of those lineups, and you’ve got a team that looks like a no-brainer for the Conference Finals, at the very least.

I could tell you that Rose was impressive with 31 points on 27 shots but was a play or two away
from glory, that Antawn Jamison has been overlooked entirely in this
series, or that Joakim Noah’s aggressive style got the better of him —
but what’s the point? The outcome of this series isn’t exactly a
surprise, and neither was the outcome of Game 5.

The Cavs weren’t perfect in this game, and they weren’t perfect in the series; Shaq is still working himself back into a groove, LeBron is forcing some things, and their defense could stand to improve. This team, despite their status as a title contender, is not necessarily in tip-top shape for championship-level competition. That’s okay, though, because a second round date with the Boston Celtics should be just what the doctor ordered. There’s enough animosity on both sides that if the Cavs need a wake-up call, they’re sure to get it in the coming games.

The Bulls don’t need a wake-up call. They can snooze until the draft and until free agency, as they’ve made their case as an intriguing free agent destination. Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade should take note of every Derrick Rose floater, every Joakim Noah rebound, every shot that Luol Deng bothered.

Chicago may not be deep now, but they could very well be by next season’s opening tip. The developing talent there is undeniable, and while I can’t imagine a single NBA player declaring their desire to go play for Vinny Del Negro, the prestige of the team and the talent already in place (don’t forget about supplementary pieces like Kirk Hinrich and Taj Gibson, either) could be enough to draw some major upgrades.

Report: Timberwolves offered Andrew Wiggins to Nets in sign-and-trade for D’Angelo Russell

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Rumors have swirled about D'Angelo Russell signing with the Timberwolves in free agency this summer.

The huge question: How would capped-out Minnesota make that happen?

Darren Wolfson of SKOR North:

I am told there was some dialogue with Brooklyn to see if the Nets would have some interest in a sign-and-trade, Wiggins for D’Angelo Russell. I don’t sense those talks got even a smidge off the ground. I mean, the Nets are not taking on that contract.

Andrew Wiggins (four years, $122,242,800 remaining) might have the NBA’s worst contract. It’ll be hard to find any team that wants him. Brooklyn – which looks like favorites to land Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant – certainly isn’t using its cap space on Wiggins.

Maybe the Timberwolves have other ideas for getting Russell. This one obviously would’ve favored Minnesota. It doesn’t hurt to ask.

But if this was the Timberwolves’ plan, we can put the Russell-Minnesota rumors to bed.

Rudy Gobert says he’ll relinquish DPOY to little girl playing adorably intense defense (video)

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I’ve been looking all day for an excuse to post this video on a site called ProBasketballTalk.

Jazz center Rudy Gobertwho just won Defensive Player of the Year – provided it.

Gobert:

Everyone frets about young basketball players emulating Stephen Curry. But Patrick Beverley apparently also has influence.

Report: Knicks considering offering DeMarcus Cousins big one-year contract if they miss on stars

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The Knicks will reportedly roll over their cap space if they don’t sign Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving or Kawhi Leonard this summer.

Of course, New York must still field a team for 2019-20. After six straight losing seasons – including a franchise-worst 17-65 this season – the Knicks might even want to be somewhat competitive.

A candidate to fill the roster: DeMarcus Cousins.

Marc Stein of The New York Times:

If the Knicks are intent keeping cap space clear for 2020 (when the free-agent class looks weak) if they strike out this year, Cousins could make sense. His shot-creation skills would raise their floor. He was a star not long ago.

But leg injuries have sidetracked Cousins’ career. He’ll turn 29 before the season. It’s not certain he’ll ever return to form.

For that reason, Cousins might prioritize multi-year offers with more total compensation, even if the annual average salary is lower. He can’t assume he’ll stay healthy and productive next season and that huge offers will follow in 2020.

Of course, Cousins might not get those multi-year offers this summer. That’s why a one-year deal in New York could work for him. It’d be another chance to improve his stock, much like his season with the Warriors was supposed to provide.

I doubt either the Knicks or Cousins want this. New York prefers better players. Cousins surely desires a larger long-term deal. But they might have to settle for each other.

Kevin Durant reportedly sells home in California, rumored to have bought one in New York

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Kevin Durant‘s company moved its office to New York. He could follow, to the Nets or Knicks, in free agency.

Maybe he’s already on the way?

Neal J. Leitereg of the Los Angeles Times:

Kevin Durant has wrapped up some business in Malibu, selling his oceanfront home on Broad Beach for $12.15 million.

Accounting for real estate commissions and other fees, the sale comes out as a bit of a wash for the 10-time all-star. He bought the place last year for $12.05 million, The Times previously reported in April.

Ric Bucher of Bleacher Report:

sources familiar with Durant’s off-court business say Durant has since purchased a new home in New York and moved his belongings there.

Many NBA players spend their offseasons in Southern California. I’m not sure what to make of Durant selling his house there. This isn’t Durant selling his condo in San Francisco, where the Warriors will open a new arena next season.

Buying a place in New York would be more significant, but a player buying a house in a city where he could sign is a classic rumor. It often gets spread whether or not it’s true. I’m skeptical of the sourcing here.

But if Durant no longer plans to play in California, it could make more sense to sell his Malibu home. Of course, he could buy another house near Los Angeles. We just know he sold this specific place on Broad Beach. We can’t extrapolate with certainty.

And Durant could buy a house in New York for the offseason. He might want to be closer to his company in the summer. That doesn’t mean he’ll play for New York or Brooklyn.

So, I’d nudge the odds of Durant leaving Golden State for the Nets or Knicks slightly higher based on this information. But I wouldn’t overreact to it.