Baseline to Baseline, your game recaps

1 Comment

What you missed while playing with your beer bottle opening remote control

Spurs 99, Thunder 96: Learning to win is filled with hard lessons, and the Spurs have been dishing them out to the Thunder all season. These are teams on opposite trajectories, but the Spurs have things to teach the young Thunder.

The latest came in a game where it was painfully clear how much more athletic the Thunder are, and with the Spurs on the second night of a back-to-back their legs looked tired. For a stretch late in the game, the Spurs missed six of seven while Serge Ibaka was bothering Duncan and blocking everything.

I can’t really stand the “they just find a way to win” cliché, but the Spurs just do not die. They stayed in it with smart plays then Manu Ginobili got the game winning free throws by making the veteran play of driving into Ibaka and drawing the foul. Meanwhile the Thunder were making rookie mistakes like when Russell Westbrook stepped on the line trying to inbound the ball. Oklahoma City’s final shot was not a mistake, Kevin Durant drew the double and got Thabo Sefolosha got a good look. It just missed. Hard lesson.

Magic 109, Sixers 93: If you don’t close out on Orlando’s three point shooters and mean it, it will be a long night. Orlando made 16 of 31 from beyond the arc. It was interesting early because Elton Brand went all 2006 and put up 18 early points. The Magic countered with the twin towers of Howard and Gortat. Dwight Howard had a double-double by halftime with that lineup and the Magic were in control the whole way.

Heat 99, Nets 89: Would it surprise you if I said that the Nets had the lead at halftime and got blown out in the third quarter? What if I told you the Nets made a late push but Miami held them off because Wade was 9 of 13 and the Heat just had better talent and could make the plays?

Bulls 98, Rockets 88: Hustle cannot make up for terrible shooting. Chicago played pretty good defense, but Rockets just missed open looks all night long. They shot 33 percent for the game and in the first 18 minutes of second half shot 13 percent. For the Bulls right now any win is a good one.

Bucks, 98, Hawks 95: Please, please let this be the four/five matchup in the East. It would be the best first round matchup of all the playoffs. Andrew Bogut and Al Horford are just fun to watch go at each other. Or see if the Hawks can keep John Salmons from scoring 32, 16 in the final quarter (when he was the best player on the floor).

This was not Joe Johnson’s finest hour. He fouled John Salmons late, trying to deny him the ball out near midcourt (the resulting free throws put the Bucks up 97-95). At the other end the ball was in his hand and he had a little eight-foot baseline floater that normally falls but did not this time, and that was ballgame.

Raptors 106, Timberwolves 100: Defense was banned from the Target Center for this one. Toronto just happened to shoot better on the night.

Hornets 115, Mavericks 95: Dallas has lost three of four since their 13-game post-trade wining streak, and they may now be playing their way into a tough first-round matchup. This game swung on a 23-0 Hornets run from last in the second quarter over to the start of the third. Not sure what else you think you need to know, teams that give up 23-0 runs rarely win games. Marcus Thornton had 28 after being pushed into the starting lineup.

Chris Paul looked good — not quite his spectacular self yet, but not like a guy who missed 25 games after knee surgery. He had 11 points and hit three of five from three. Good for the game to have him back.  

Jazz 110, Celtics 97: Deron Williams just abused Rajon Rondo in this one. If it is possible to be an underrated star in the NBA, Williams is it. He may be the best PG in the league. The Celtics led at half but their strategy of big guys protecting the paint left Mehmet Okur a bunch of good looks from three and he hit four of six from deep and spurred some second half runs. The Jazz at home are hard to beat and the Celtics were just not up to the task.

Grizzlies 102, Kings 85: This one was pre-ordained since Sacramento was without Tyreke Evans. Credit the Kings for hanging in and leading at the half, but this was going to end poorly for them.

Suns 133, Warriors 131: Most entertaining game of the night, by a mile. This game showcased the good and the bad of the Warriors lately — they got 29 points from Reggie Williams, a guy who has been in the NBA for 12 games after spending most of the season in the D-League. But with the game close late, the Warriors were in a situation down three where they needed Monta Ellis to make the first (he did) and miss the second, and Ellis shot it long and banked it in on accident. They find the players, they can’t execute.

Anthony Tolliver got his welcome to the NBA moment from Amare Stoudemire of the Suns. A vicious dunk.

Report: Rockets tried to give away Chris Paul, but teams – including Knicks – said no

AP Photo/Eric Christian Smith
1 Comment

Rockets general manager Daryl Morey not only denied a report that Chris Paul demanded a trade, Morey said Paul would remain in Houston next season.

We might never know how tense the situation has gotten between Paul and James Harden. We might never know whether Paul requested a trade.

But we will know whether Paul begins next season in Houston.

Morey’s credibility is on the line with that. Will he really refuse to trade Paul? That’s not Morey’s style.

More likely, Morey made that declaration only after exhausting the market for Paul and the three years, $124,076,442 remaining on his contract.

Shams Charania of The Athletic, via CBS:

There’s not a team in the league right now that is like, “I’m going to go trade for Chris Paul.” Even some teams that they’ve called, I’m told, as just a dump, like, “We’ll give you Chris Paul for free,” those teams are like “We’re good.” So, the value just is not there right now.

Kevin O’Connor of The Ringer:

The Rockets recently explored trading Chris Paul into New York’s cap space, but the Knicks refused, according to league sources.

Good for the Knicks resisting. With Kyrie Irving apparently (maybe?) headed to the Nets and Kevin Durant‘s future up in the air, that’s the type of desperate move New York is known to make.

Paul, 34, is overpaid and declining. No team should absorb his contract into cap space.

But he’s still pretty good. Not nearly as good as he once was, but good enough to help the Rockets. Their championship window hasn’t necessarily snapped completely shut yet. There’s value in keeping Paul and trying to repair his and Harden’s relationship.

There also might be better opportunities later in the summer to trade Paul. Teams want to preserve their cap space now for free agents. But some teams will strike out and might view Paul as a good fallback option.

Of course, if Morey thought a deal later in the offseason were a possibility, he probably wouldn’t have so explicitly insisted Paul will remain in Houston.

Report: Minnesota “aggressive” in trying to trade up in draft, talked to Pelicans about fourth pick

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Minnesota Timberwolves are slotted to pick 11th in the NBA Draft Thursday night. There they could land players along the lines of Brandon Clarke or Rui Hachimura, both of Gonzaga.

The Timberwolves have their sights set higher and they are looking to move up in the draft — maybe all the way to No. 4, reports Marc Stein of The New York Times.

Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic fleshed out some details.

Among the options being considered, as first reported by ESPN, is moving all the way up to No. 4, presumably for a shot at Vanderbilt point guard Darius Garland. He missed most of his lone season in college due to a knee injury, but prior to that was widely scouted as the top point guard in the draft class. Interest in such a move is indicative of Rosas’s mindset of star-chasing, an approach honed in Houston.

That sounds great in theory, but what is the deal to be made for the fourth pick? David Griffin of the Pelicans has made it clear the No. 4 pick is available, but they want a veteran — and one not too old — in return. The Timberwolves don’t have that guy on their roster. (Technically they do in Andrew Wiggins, but that’s not a contract — four years, $122.3 million remaining — that the Pelicans would take on.)

Minnesota’s head of basketball operations Gersson Rosas told The Athletic how hard this kind of trade can be.

“The reality is, and history will tell you, it’s hard to trade up into the top three of the draft, even top five in the lottery,” Rosas said. “It’s very difficult. We know, because we’re tried, and will continue to try. But that price, the premium that teams charge for that is at a high level in any draft in any year.”

Minnesota seems a long shot, but don’t be surprised if the Pelicans trade the No. 4 pick. New Orleans has worked hard to find someone to take that pick off their hands, so long as they get a fair price back.

Report: Nets debating whether or not to sign Kyrie Irving without Kevin Durant

AP Photo/Elise Amendola
Leave a comment

The Nets want to sign Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving.

Brooklyn appears set to get Irving. Durant a much bigger unknown.

Brian Lewis of the New York Post:

The question is if they can’t land Durant, do they still want Irving?

It also has become an internal debate the Nets are having right now.

The Post has confirmed Brooklyn might have qualms about signing the enigmatic Irving if he isn’t bringing the injured Durant with him.

Irving brings chemistry concerns, to be sure. He’s mercurial, and his season with the Celtics raises legitimate questions about him leading a team.

But Irving is a major talent upgrade. To win at the highest levels, teams must assemble a lot of talent and hope for the best.

I’d also caution Brooklyn against assuming re-signing D'Angelo Russell would mean the team maintains its current culture. The Nets can’t freeze time. Situations change. People change. There’s no guarantee Russell on a lucrative contract and his teammates jell as well as contract-year Russell and his teammates did.

Keeping Russell might look like the safe route, but nothing is assured.

The other huge issue: Durant might not know where he’ll sign when Irving is ready to commit. The Nets could have to decide on Irving before knowing whether Durant will accompany him. At that point, would Brooklyn really spurn Irving and a chance at getting both stars? I can’t see that.

Really, with so much talk of Irving joining the Nets, I thought we’d already crossed that threshold.

Report: Bucks trading Tony Snell, No. 30 pick to Pistons

Gregory Shamus/Getty Images
1 Comment

For a team only lukewarm on paying the luxury tax, the Bucks are in a payroll crunch. Khris Middleton, Brook Lopez, Malcolm Brogdon and Nikola Mirotic will be free agents this summer.

That’s why Milwaukee was trying to unload Tony Snell or Ersan Ilyasova.

But if they re-sign their key free agents to multi-year deals, the Bucks could face more payroll/tax concerns in 2020-21.

That’s why Milwaukee is willing to deal Snell and its first-round pick for Jon Leuer‘s burdensome contract – which carries a slightly lower salary than Snell’s next season ($9,508,043 vs. $11,592,857) and, more importantly, ends one year before Snell’s ($12,378,571 player option for 2020-21),

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

This trade lowers Milwaukee’s team salary by about $4 million next season and $14 million the following season.

The Bucks could stretch Leuer and reduce team salary by an extra $6,338,695 next season. But that’d also lock in a cap hit of $3,169,348 each of the next three years.

Milwaukee can make that decision later in the summer. It’ll depend what other free agents – especially Lopez, who has only Non-Bird Rights (technically a form of Bird Rights – command. Clearing extra money this offseason could be useful in multiple scenarios.

If Lopez signs for the non-taxpayer mid-level exception (which projects to start at about $9 million), the Bucks could maintain Bird Rights for Middleton, Brogdon and Mirotic then exceed the cap to re-sign those three. But Milwaukee would be hard-capped at a projected $138 million. Stretching Leuer could help the Bucks stay under that line.

If re-signing Lopez requires more than the mid-level exception, Milwaukee could open about $14 million in cap space by waiving George Hill and renouncing all its free agents besides Middleton and Brogdon. Stretching Leuer would open even more cap room to spend on Lopez.

If Lopez leaves, the same math applies to an outside free agent who could get the mid-level exception or cap room.

This extra maneuverability comes at a cost, though a reasonable one.

Snell, who fell from the Bucks’ rotation, could be the Pistons’ starting small forward next season. Detroit was desperate for wing depth. Though Snell isn’t the biggest wing, he adds size to a group comprised of Luke Kennard, Bruce Brown and Langston Galloway.

The No. 30 pick is a helpful piece to the Pistons, who also have the No. 15 pick in tomorrow’s draft. But this is a weak-looking draft that thins considerably before the end of the first round.

Milwaukee also had to take Leuer, who has been ineffective for years.

Detroit gets helps now with Snell and potentially later with the No. 30 pick. In between, that extra year of Snell’s contract looks burdensome.

The Bucks are just happy to have it not be theirs.