Knicks woes not D'Antoni's fault

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D'antoni.jpgIt’s not easy to watch the Knicks right now. Almost as hard as sitting through a Dane Cook concert. It’s just not entertaining or interesting, and the losing is wearing on Knicks fans.

And they want to blame the coach. Mike D’Antoni. Right or wrong.

Knicks President Donnie Walsh tried to change that yesterday by throwing himself in front of the bus.

Walsh, the Knicks president, still believes his plan to rebuild the club through free agency was the prudent call even though there are no guarantees the team will sign one of the top pending free agents – LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh – this summer, or that Walsh will be around to see his plan come to fruition.

“I didn’t say in one summer we’re going to turn around and build a championship team,” Walsh said. “And I’m not asking for time. I won’t have that much time. But I know one thing: Now at least we have a flexible position, and whether it’s next summer or the summer after, we’re going to start adding players to this team that can lead you in that direction.”

Got to love the New York media, saying Walsh “still believes” in his plan. As if there was another plan other than two years of pain to clear out what Thomas hath wrought on that roster. It had to be done. I get it, Knicks fans are impatient. Owner James Dolan may be getting impatient. It’s been a couple years of the Walsh/D’Antoni era and things are not better on the court. And LeBron isn’t coming. And losing sucks.

But this isn’t on D’Antoni — Phil Jackson could coach this roster with John Wooden as his assistant and they wouldn’t win two more games than D’Antoni has. The old coaching axiom is, “It’s not the Xs and Os, it’s the Jimmy and Joes.” You have to have the talent. Was Doc Rivers a much better coach in 2008 than in 2007? No. He just had Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen added to his team, and that makes any coach look smart.

The thing is, things are better now in New York because there is cap space. There is flexibility now to start building a team that fits D’Antoni’s system rather than the square pegs that are there now.

Fans are right to be pissed that the players are not hustling night in and night out, but at the NBA level that is on the players more than the coach. These are professionals, and college rah-rah speeches have limited effect. The teams that bust it hard every night do so because a player leads that charge. Did the Celtics hustle because of Doc or Garnett? The Lakers because of Jackson or Kobe?

None of this makes it any fun to watch the Knicks right now, even with Tracy McGrady back. And nothing is changing that until the season ends.

Steven Adams restrained by referee from confrontation with Nuggets fan (video)

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Steven Adams is one of the NBA’s toughest players.

But that didn’t stop a Nuggets fan from heckling the Thunder center during Denver’s win Friday.

Adams stepped toward the fan and yelled, to the point a referee restrained him. Russell Westbrook – who lost his temper later in the game – also yelled at the fan.

It’s hard to hear exactly what Adams and Westbrook said. But it sounds profane enough both players could get fined.

Kings coach Dave Joerger on Luka Doncic: ‘Perhaps there was an idea that there was a ceiling on him. I don’t see it, unfortunately for us’

Ronald Martinez/Getty Images
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No. 2 pick Marvin Bagley has been solid for the Kings.

No. 3 pick Luka Doncic has been even better for the Mavericks.

Doncic had 28 points and nine assists against Sacramento yesterday. Though the Kings won, questions have still swirled about why they didn’t just draft Doncic. Sacramento coach Dave Joerger even weighed in on the rookie.

Joerger, via James Ham of NBC Sports California:

“Perhaps there was an idea that there was a ceiling on him – I don’t see it, unfortunately for us,” Joerger said. “He’s great for them and he’s great for our league.”

Coaches commonly praise a young opponent then add a variation of “unfortunately for us” – as in, unfortunately we’ll have to play against him for many years.

But it’s easy to infer deeper significance here.

The Kings seemingly drafted Bagley for bad reasons – i.e., his desire to go to Sacramento. Doncic looked like the better prospect. But Kings assistant general manager Brandon Williams helped steer the team toward Bagley. When Joerger played veteran Nemanja Bjelica over Williams-preferred Bagley, that caused drama earlier this season. The Williams-Joerger rift apparently continued, too.

So, Joerger’s remarks could have been a thinly veiled shot at Sacramento’s front office. Maybe the coach didn’t intended it that way, but it wouldn’t be a huge leap.

Report: Knicks owner James Dolan used to play guitar on team flights after losses

AP Photo/Richard Drew
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Knicks owner James Dolan is widely regarded as one of the worst owners in sports.

He’s also defiantly himself.

That came through in a lengthy profile by Ian O’Connor of ESPN. Dolan is still defending his organization after losing a sexual-harassment lawsuit. Dolan is still blaming Charles Oakley for an ejection from Madison Square Garden last year. Dolan is still trying to contextualize his relationship with Harvey Weinstein.

But Dolan won’t concede one eye-opening claim.

O’Connor:

Jim is the owner who years ago, on occasion, would play his guitar on the Knicks’ team plane — even after losses, according to several witnesses. “It was the last thing the players and coaches wanted to hear,” says one regular on those flights. “I just remember the looks on their faces.” (Dolan denies this claim and calls it “somebody’s fantasy.”)

Dolan has made a lot of enemies over the years. It wouldn’t be shocking if one made up a story to make him look bad and others corroborated it for the same reason.

Because it’s quite believable.

Dolan is more passionate about his music than owning the Knicks. This also wouldn’t be the first time he subjected players to his musical interest.

Occam’s razor suggests Dolan did this rather than a conspiracy existing to frame him. Besides, believing he did it is way more fun.

Ahead on Nets fastbreak, Rodions Kurucs whips pass… farther ahead (video)

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With D’Angelo Harris to his left, Rondae Hollins-Jefferson to his right, Joe Harris trailing and only Hawks in front of him, Nets rookie Rodions Kurucs passed ahead. Confidently. That was a bullet.

But to nobody – except maybe the referee. It looked high for the ref, though maybe an NBA player would have snagged the throw.

At Brooklyn still beat Atlanta, 144-127.