Baseline to Baseline, your game recaps

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Perkins_game.jpgWhat happened Wednesday, while you were celebrating your new Ghostbusters prints

Celtics 104 Bobcats 80: Or, “How The Celtics Got Their Groove Back.” The Bobcats hung for a half, giving the Celtics all they could handle. Then the Celtics broke it open and never looked back. 35 points total for the Cats in the second half. Pierce came back, 9-13 shooting, 27 points, and that along with Marquis Daniels putting in 2 turnovers in 30 minutes, that’s enough if the Bobcats’ offense reverts back to primordial ooze (or earlier in the season).

Tyrus Thomas had 15 and 10 with 2 blocked shots, but the Bobcats were forced into nothing but jumpers. That won’t get it done.

Cavaliers 111, Nets 92: The Cavaliers just toyed with the Nets, like Itchy does with Scratchy. Except not as entertaining after a while. LeBron had eight assists in the first quarter, including a jumping bounce pass to Anderson Varejao off the high pick-and-roll. The Nets kinda, sorta stayed close, but only because the Cavs were toying with them, not trying to finish them. If you watched all of this one you are a better man than I. Five straight wins for the Cavs.

Knicks 128 Pistons 104: Not that Ben Wallace is the sole defensive impact on the Pistons, but with Wallace out with a knee injury, the Pistons did give up double digits to six of the eight Knicks that played.

Tracy McGrady had another flashback game, reminding us that he can be an impact guy. He shot 50% from the floor, and had 7 rebounds and 8 assists. It’s got to be frustrating for McGrady of all people, to know what he’s capable of, but not be able to do it consistently. Then again, if Austin Daye is getting time on him, who knows what can happen?

Bucks 100 Wizards 87: Please notice Ersan Ilyasova. I’m begging you. Great offensive range, good on the boards, excellent length, good lateral movement, can contain the pick and roll, can work from the high post, and just an overall blood getter. 19 points, 10 rebounds, 6 assists, 1 steal, 1 block, and 1 turnover in 32 minutes. That’s good Sova.

Blatche had another good game, but as is the formula against good defensive squads, the team with less talent suffered. The Wizards’ help defense actually wasn’t bad, it’s just that the Bucks didn’t turn it over at all, and they forced 21 .  They created fast breaks, they created confusion, and they got buckets. They are currently the team you don’t want on your schedule.

Hawks 112, 76ers 93: Did you really think this was going to turn out any other way?

Magic 117, Warriors 90: Best shot in this one happened before the game even started — during warm ups Dwight Howard hit a left-handed 30 footer while sitting down in the front row next to general manager Otis Smith. Golden State hung around for 18 minutes, until Vince Carter and the rest of the Magic got serious. Orlando tightened up their defense, took away the transition shots (and threes). Not that this game was ever, ever in doubt. Favorite play of the night came in the third quarter, when Howard made the steal then led the break himself (and got the assist).
 
Grizzlies 104 Hornets 100: Sloppy, ugly game. Fun, but nasty. Both teams turned it over, both teams had defensive lapses (especially the Hornets in the early 2nd). In the end, Zach Randolph hit a ridiculous bank three pointer with the shot clock expiring to secure it.

The only thing more unlikely than Z-Bo’s three falling was Mike Conley having a night to hang his contract on, with 27 points, 5 steals, and 7 assists. Sure, he clanged two free throws late to give the Hornets a shot at stealing a win at home, but his other drives and floaters were what helped get them there.

O.J. Mayo has lost his jumper completely, and I’m afraid Marcus Thornton may have stolen it.

Mavericks 112: Wolves 109: Corey Brewer is legit. He’s having a coming out season for a forgotten team, but he’s the next of the Florida crew to prove he can ball. MEanwhile, Jason Kidd took a night off, Dirk Nowitzki had a bad night by his standards.

And the Mavs won. When you win games against plucky teams having an on night with things not going your way? That’s a good sign.

Kings 84 Houston 81: The teams shot a combined .710 from the field. Combined. As in, if you add their shooting percentages together. This is bad. As a very gracious and eloquent commenter points out, they shot .350 from the floor if you calculate their combined percentage. This is an abomination.Carl Landry had a good game. Let’s all pretend this never happened, lest we use it as the boogeymen in stories for our kids to scare them straight.

Nuggets 119 Thunder 90: The dreaded road SEGABABA (SEcond GAme of a BAck to BAck) for the Thunder, and once the Nuggets foun their rhythm, this was chalk. When Birdman Anderson is hitting jumpers? It’s not your night.

The Nuggs can sure defend and score. After they’ve had their backsides handed to them by two Western Conference contenders and as long as they’re at home against a team on a SEGABABA (second game of a back-to-back). Fine win for the Nuggets, not a huge loss for the Thunder, they were due one of these. Just your regular schedule-based beatdown.

Suns 127, Clippers 101: It’s the old “chicken or the egg” debate: Is it that the Suns offense is that good or the Clippers defense just that bad? The correct answer is “C” — both.

Trail Blazers, 102, Pacers 79: This game is like a teaching tool for the four factors that decide the outcome of a game. Rule number one is the team that shoots better wins, but in this case Portland shot 43.2 percent and Indiana 43.4 percent. Nearly identical. So on to the other factors, like the fact Portland had 30 free throws on the night to Indiana’s 11; Portland had 12 offensive rebounds to Indiana’s five; Portland had 9 turnovers to Indiana’s 18. It was everything but the shooting that made this a blowout.

NBA’s minor league to offer $125,000 salaries to not-yet-draft-eligible 18-year-olds

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The NBA will lower its age limit to 18, effectively ending the one-and-done era.

Eventually.

In the meantime, the best option for most top players leaving high school is college basketball. But while the NBA takes its time changing a rule (that it never should have implemented in the first place), the NBA’s minor league will offer an alternative route.

G League release:

The NBA G League today announced a Select Contract as part of a comprehensive professional path that will be available, beginning with the 2019-20 season, to elite prospects who are eligible to play in the NBA G League but not yet eligible for the NBA.  The contracts, which will include robust programmatic opportunities for development, are for elite players who are at least 18 years old and will pay $125,000 for the five-month season.

NBA G League Select Contracts are designed for year-round professional growth and will include opportunities for basketball development, life skills mentorship and academic scholarship.  These offerings are slated to include basketball workouts during the summer months through existing NBA infrastructure like NBA Summer League and NBA Academies, year-round education programs designed to increase players’ ability to personally and professionally manage their careers, and a scholarship program for athletes who want to pursue higher education after their playing days.  Additionally, the NBA G League will further enhance player experience through existing partner relationships and NBA player development programming.

The $125,000 salary is nice and a sizeable jump from the standard minor-league salary, which these players were already eligible to receive. Select Contract players can also sign endorsements and receive loans from agents while remaining eligible to play, unlike in the NCAA.

But it’s not as if college basketball players aren’t compensated. Though their compensation is limited by the NCAA cartel, players still get tuition, room and board and cost-of-living expenses. And of course many get under-the-table money, too. The value of that compensation – particularly the tuition – varies by person.

Access to NBA infrastructure could swing some players, but that also comes with risk. Older professionals could expose younger, even more talented, players. Experience and physical advancement matter.

So does the stage. Top college-basketball players are nationally recognized stars who appear regular on television and are revered on campus. Minor-league players are relatively anonymous and play in mid-sized cities away from much fanfare.

There’s still plenty to sort out, and the details could affect how many players enter this new program out of high school. But it’s nice they have another option.

It’d be far better if they could just declare for the NBA draft if they feel they’re ready.

Anthony Davis challenging Michael Jordan as best opening-game player on record

AP Photo/Michael Wyke
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Anthony Davis called himself the NBA’s best player.

He sure backed it up last night.

Davis posted a 32-16-8-3-3 to lead the Pelicans to a 19-point win over the Rockets, considered by many to be the NBA’s second-best team. The performance immediately vaults Davis to the forefront of any MVP discussions.

But for him, it was just par for the course. Davis has repeatedly dazzled in season openers. When 18-6-2-3 qualifies as the dud, you know Davis is doing something right.

Davis’ box scores in New Orleans’ first game each season:

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That makes Davis’ average season-opener game score 24.1, one of the best ever. Only Michael Jordan has a higher mark on record (since 1983, as far back as Basketball-Reference records go; minimum: three games).

Here are the leaders:

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Obviously, Davis cares more about how he finishes than starts. The Pelicans have made the playoffs only twice with him, getting swept in the first round in 2015 and falling in the second round last season.

But it should be clear by now: Davis comes to play as soon as the season tips.

PBT Extra: Boston can be team to dethrone Golden State Warriors

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I’ve heard it from friends. I’ve seen it on NBA Twitter. I’ve debated it with sports talk radio hosts.

“This NBA season is already decided, nobody has a chance against the Warriors.”

Not true.

Boston has a shot, as I get into in this PBT Extra.

Absolutely the Warriors are the odds-on favorites to win it all, if healthy they should three-peat. They were my pick. But I believe Boston has a legitimate shot to dethrone the Warriors — they have the wing athletes, the switchability on defense, the scoring, the versatility. A Boston/Golden State Finals is going six or seven games… if we get there. It’s just day two of a long season.

But I believe in Boston.