Tag: Will Bynum

Will Bynum

Report: Celtics likely to waive Will Bynum after acquiring him in trade with Pistons


Will Bynum has been a somewhat serviceable backup point guard option in Detroit for the last six seasons, but with the team loaded at the position and needing some potential frontcourt depth, the Pistons traded him to the Celtics in exchange for Joel Anthony on Friday.

But the situation for Bynum isn’t any better in Boston, and it’s unlikely he ends up sticking on the roster.

From Gary Washburn of the Boston Globe:

Celtics president of basketball operations Danny Ainge and guard Will Bynum are expected to meet on Saturday, according to two NBA sources, and the team is likely to waive Bynum, who was acquired Friday from the Detroit Pistons. …

The Celtics still have 16 guaranteed contracts, including that of rookie Dwight Powell, and just 15 roster spots. So Ainge will have to waive a player with a guaranteed deal or make a trade to reduce before the season opener Oct. 29 against the Brooklyn Nets.

After Saturday’s meeting, that move is expected to be Bynum, who will garner interest on the free agent market once he is placed on waivers.

Marc Stein of ESPN.com reports that the ultimate decision on whether Bynum stays in Boston may not come down until next week.

[Bynum’s agent] said sides plan to “take a deep breath” and play out next week before Celts decide whether to keep or waive newly acquired guard

On the Celtics side, the move saves them in the neighborhood of $900,000, and will keep the team further out of luxury tax territory for the upcoming season. If Bynum is waived, it means Boston feels it’s good at point guard with Rajon Rondo, Marcus Smart, and Phil Pressey already in place.

Bynum averaged 8.9 points and 3.7 assists in 18.8 minutes per contest for the Pistons last season.

Trade official: Celtics trade Joel Anthony to Pistons for Will Bynum

Boston Celtics Media Day

UPDATE 3:24 PM: And it’s official and done, Will Bynum is headed to Boston (at least temporarily) and Joel Anthony is part of the crowded Pistons’ front court.

11:18 AM: The Boston Celtics would like to save some cash.

The Detroit Pistons want depth along the front line because Aaron Gray has been out and it’s possible down the line they could trade one of their front line guys (Greg Monroe).

So the two have come together on a possible trade, reports Chris Forsberg of ESPNBoston.com.

The Boston Celtics are working to finalize a trade that will send center Joel Anthony to the Detroit Pistons for guard Will Bynum, according to a league source.

The Celtics appear to be making the move with roster flexibility in mind. They have 16 fully guaranteed contracts on their books and must trim that to 15 before the start of the regular season. Swapping Anthony, who is set to make $3.8 million this season, for Bynum, who will earn $2.9 million, will save the team $900,000.

Bynum is buried on the Pistons depth chart, but that doesn’t really change in Boston. He likely doesn’t stick with the team, suggests A. Sherrod Blakely of CSNNE.com.

This deal appears almost done and likely gets finalized later on Friday or at least over the weekend.

Reports: Pistons signing Caron Butler, D.J. Augustin

Detroit Pistons v Los Angeles Clippers

The Pistons shot 32.1 percent on 3-pointers last season, finishing 29th in the league.

Considering they bested only the 76ers, the Pistons practically finished last among legitimate NBA teams.

New Detroit president/coach Stan Van Gundy values outside shooting, and he keeps upgrading in free agency. His top signings – including the two most-recent additions – shot very very well from beyond the arc last season:

  • Jodie Meeks: 40.1 percent
  • Cartier Martin: 39.1 percent
  • Caron Butler: 39.4 percent
  • D.J. Augustin: 40. 1 percent

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Caron Butler has agreed to sign a deal with the Detroit Pistons, according to a source.

The source told ESPN.com that the deal is for two years in the range of $10 million

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Free-agent guard D.J. Augustin has reached agreement on a two-year, $6 million contract with the Detroit Pistons, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

Butler’s overall game has deteriorated, but his 3-point shooting has come on strong in recent years. At 34, he likely must accept that spot-up role. Paying $10 million over two years for that seems costly, but the second year is a team option, according to Vincent Goodwill of The Detroit News. (I’d guess it’s actually unguaranteed, but either way, the Pistons aren’t committed.)

Augustin, who averaged 14.9 points and 5.0 assists per game with the Bulls, finished second among reserves in win shares last season. He really showed an ability to inject life into a stagnant offense.

With Josh Smith likely moving primarily back to power forward after a disastrous season at small forward and Brandon Jennings the incumbent point guard, Butler and Augustin each have a chance to start. That speaks both to their abilities and Detroit’s roster.

The Pistons now have nine players with guaranteed contracts, two with unguaranteed contracts, five incoming free agents, an unsigned second-round pick and the right to match any offer for restricted free agent Greg Monroe. Even waiving the two players with unguaranteed contracts, Peyton Siva* and Josh Harrellson, still puts the Pistons on track for 16 players – if Monroe returns.

*Siva’s contract was set to become guaranteed Sunday, according to ShamSports.com, and there has been no word on the Pistons waiving him. However it’s possible the Pistons and Siva agreed to postpone the guarantee date.

You don’t let a player of Monroe’s caliber leave just to sign these players or Aaron Gray, Detroit’s other offseason signing. The Pistons might have a trade in the works, or they could eat the guarantee salary of Tony Mitchell or Will Bynum. It’s even possible they could waive both, opening the door for one more outside signing.

Most likely, though, handling Monroe is the Pistons’ last remaining free-agent move now.

Pistons decline team option on Chauncey Billups

Chauncey Billups, Charlie Villanueva

Chauncey Billups was not a Piston long enough.

The Pistons traded him for Allen Iverson in 2008, quickly sinking themselves from title contention. Though the deal had merit at the time, hindsight says Detroit absolutely should have kept Billups and co. together and let the championship core age and decline naturally.

After resurging with his hometown Nuggets and then bouncing to the Knicks and Clippers, Billups signed with the Pistons last summer. The two-year deal contained a $2.5 million team option that became a no-brainer to decline by today’s deadline.

I’d like to think the Pistons waited until so late in the day to announce it so Billups would remain on team just a little longer. But they couldn’t delay forever.

Keith Langlois of Pistons.com:

Billups missed 169 games the last three years. There was no way the Pistons could justify keeping him at $2.5 million.

Brandon Jennings, flaws and all, is substantially better. Will Bynum is an OK enough backup. Even Peyton Siva contributes more now.

Billups can’t even get on the court. There’s no room for him as Detroit’s fourth point guard.

This is quite possibly the end of Billups’ playing career, but he could remain in basketball after retirement.

Billups is bright and balances keeping a level head with with an intense competitiveness. Everyone agrees he’d make a good coach. He doesn’t want to pursue that path, though. He wants a front-office job.

He returned to Detroit to retire and move into management, but the man who signed him, Joe Dumars, is no longer in power.

Is there room for Billups in Stan Van Gundy’s organization?

If there is, I bet Billups would be interested. If Dumars lands a new job elsewhere, Billups could fit there, too.

He’s played for eight teams – the Celtics, Raptors, Nuggets (twice), Magic, Timberwolves, Pistons (twice), Knicks and Clippers. He certainly has connections around the league.

If Billups really wants to keep playing, I bet he could get a veteran-minimum deal somewhere next season. At worst, he’s a great locker-room presence. Someone would value that and hope Billups can make a few spot-up 3-pointers.

But even that leadership role carries less weight when he can’t get on the court. This is probably the end of the line for the 37-year-old Billups.

As a player and executive, Billups is heading into free agency. That could be either very sad or very exciting, depending on which way Billups wants to go.

Magic waive Jameer Nelson

Los Angeles Lakers v Orlando Magic

Only Kobe Bryant, Nick Collison,

Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili, Udonis Haslem, Dirk Nowitzki, Tony Parker, Anderson Varejao and Dwyane Wade have remained with the same team the entirety of Jameer Nelson’s Magic tenure.

Nelson was drafted in 2004, the same year Orlando took Dwight Howard No. 1. Together, they helped the Magic rise into an Eastern Conference power, and Nelson remained long after Howard forced his way out of town.

But now Nelson is also leaving the rebuilding Magic. In No. 12 pick Elfrid Payton, Orlando has its point guard of the future.

Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel:

Just $2 million of Nelson’s $8 million 2014-15 salary was guaranteed, and the contract didn’t become totally guaranteed until July 16.

The Magic made the rational decision Nelson was no longer needed at that price, clearly. But I don’t understand why the Magic waived him now as opposed to waiting closer to the deadline.

Maybe it was a courtesy to allow him more options in free agency. If that were Orlando general manager Rob Hennigan’s rationale, he was being mighty generous. Nelson is likely the type teams sign after they fill most of their roster.

When the Magic sold so low on Arron Afflalo, Hennigan got a pass, because he reportedly canvassed the entire league in search of a better offer before agreeing to that deal with the Nuggets. But maybe we shouldn’t keep giving him the benefit of the doubt.

I believe Hennigan explored Nelson trades, using his contract to offer cap savings, as the Raptors did with John Salmons. So, if Hennigan couldn’t find an acceptable deal, there’s nothing wrong with waiving Nelson.

But July 16 is a long way off, and circumstances can change quickly. Quite possibly, a team could have offered a desirable trade necessitating Nelson’s contract before then.

Again, this might all fall under professional courtesy, and that’s a nice gesture if that’s the case. It’s also squandering an asset, though.

For Nelson, options in free agency will definitely emerge.

The Heat need a point guard with Mario Chalmers a free agent. Neither Norris Cole nor Shabazz Napier is good enough stay the course without trying to upgrade. Nelson’s best days are behind him, but he could definitely help a win-now team like Miami. Plus, the Heat would offer him a chance to stay in Florida.

Maybe Nelson reunites with Stan Van Gundy in Detroit. The Pistons could definitely use a more reliable point guard than Brandon Jennings, even if that’s just to pressure Jennings into steadying himself. Nelson would definitely increases Detroit’s chances of starting a better point guard, whether it’s him or Jennings, than last year. However, with Will Bynum – an OK enough backup – already contract, the Pistons might need to use their cap room on areas of greater need (wing positions).

I could also see Nelson landing with the Knicks. A quality outside shooter who’s not blazing quick, Nelson would fit well in the triangle. Jose Calderon, acquired in the Tyson Chandler trade, is a good fit, but there would be enough minutes for both.

Really, if Nelson were willing to become a backup – and he likely must – he’ll have plenty of suitors.