Tag: Wayne Ellington

Donald Sloan, Nene

Nets sign journeyman point guard Donald Sloan


The Brooklyn Nets added more backcourt depth on Monday, signing veteran point guard Donald Sloan. The team announced the move in a press release:

The Brooklyn Nets have signed guard Donald Sloan, General Manager Billy King announced today. Per team policy, terms of the contract were not released.

Sloan (6’3”, 205) has appeared in 157 games (33 starts) in four seasons with the Atlanta Hawks (2011-12), New Orleans Hornets (2011-12, 2012-13), Cleveland Cavaliers (2011-13) and Indiana Pacers (2013-15), registering averages of 4.9 points, 1.8 rebounds and 2.4 assists in 15.5 minutes per game. Sloan also saw action in four playoff games with the Pacers during the 2014 postseason. The 27-year-old Sloan put together his best professional season in 2014-15 with Indiana, posting career-highs in games played (53), starts (21), points per game (7.4), rebounds per game (2.7) and assists per game (3.6). Sloan has also spent time in the D-League and has had brief stints in China and the Philippines.

Originally undrafted in the 2010 NBA Draft, the native of Shreveport, La. began his pro career after four years at Texas A&M. Sloan helped lead the Aggies to four NCAA Tournament appearances and was named All-Big 12 First Team following his senior season. He finished his collegiate career eighth on the school’s all-time points and assists lists.

This is a good depth move for Brooklyn. With Deron Williams out of the picture, Jarrett Jack is their likeliest choice to start at point guard, but between Sloan and fellow free agent addition Shane Larkin, they have some solid options off the bench. Under the radar, Brooklyn has made some nice moves this summer, taking a veteran’s-minimum flier on Thomas Robinson and signing a proven shooter in Wayne Ellington. Adding Sloan gives them another proven contributor at a position where they have a lot of stability but not a lot of top-level talent. He absolutely will have the opportunity to earn big minutes.

Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov: “We had a really good offseason.”

Mikhail Prokhorov

It’s not very often that Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov speaks publicly about his team. But after a largely successful offseason, the team posted a two-minute video to their official website in which the Russian billionaire praised the efforts of GM Billy King.

Via the New York Post‘s Tim Bontemps:

“First of all, we had a really good offseason – better than a lot of people expected,” Prokhorov said. “Without a lot of noise, we got a lot done. Brook and Thaddeus are staying with us, which gives us continuity in our frontcourt. Joe Johnson stays as a core player. We also have high expectations for Bojan Bogdanovic, who showed us real flashes of brilliance in his first year on the Nets.

“Some of you have noticed a shift in our approach. You’ll see a team that is younger and more athletic this season. Our approach has been more strategic. We are making all necessary moves to be set up well for the future. But one thing remains constant, and make no mistake about it: We are here to win, and we’ll do whatever we can, together with all of you who are working for us.”

One player Prokhorov didn’t mention at all in the video is Deron Williams, who agreed to a buyout earlier in July before signing with his hometown Dallas Mavericks. Williams was the franchise cornerstone for much of Prokhorov’s tenure as owner, and he never really worked out the way they’d hoped.

With that said, Prokhorov is right that the team has had a pretty solid offseason. They had no choice but to keep their core together — they can’t tank for a draft pick, since all of their upcoming draft picks are either owned by Boston outright or as pick swaps. They re-signed Lopez and Young to reasonable deals, and made a few solid under-the-radar signings to fill out the end of the bench, including Shane Larkin, Wayne Ellington and Thomas Robinson. They won’t be title contenders by any means, but they’ll be in the playoff mix like they were last season.

Phil Jackson questions whether Duke players live up to expectations in NBA

2015 NBA Draft

The Knicks drafted Kristaps Porzingis with the No. 4 pick, and the early returns are positive.

But they also surely considered a couple players from Duke – Jahlil Okafor (who went No. 3 to the 76ers) and Justise Winslow (No. 10 to the Heat).

Would New York have chosen either? Knicks president Phil Jackson implies he had concerns simply because of their college team.

Jackson on Okafor, via Charlie Rosen of ESPN:

Jackson thinks he might not be aggressive enough. “Also, if you look at the guys who came to the NBA from Duke, aside from Grant Hill, which ones lived up to expectations?”

Let’s take a comprehensive look rather than cherry-picking players who could support either side of the argument.

We obviously don’t know yet whether Okafor, Winslow and Tyus Jones (No. 24 this year) will live up to expectations. Jabari Parker (No. 2 in 2014) looked pretty good last year, but he missed most of the season due to injury. It’s far too soon to make any judgments on him.

Otherwise, here are all Duke players drafted in the previous 15 years:

Lived up to expectations

  • Rodney Hood (No. 23 in 2014)
  • Mason Plumlee (No. 22 in 2013)
  • Ryan Kelly (No. 48 in 2013)
  • Miles Plumlee (No. 26 in 2012)
  • Kyrie Irving (No. 1 in 2011)
  • Kyle Singler (No. 33 in 2011)
  • Josh McRoberts (No. 37 in 2007)
  • J.J. Redick (No. 11 in 2006)
  • Luol Deng (No. 7 in 2004)
  • Chris Duhon (No. 38 in 2004)
  • Carlos Boozer (No. 34 in 2002)
  • Shane Battier (No. 6 in 2001)

Didn’t live up to expectations

  • Austin Rivers (No. 10 in 2012)
  • Nolan Smith (No. 21 in 2011)
  • Gerald Henderson (No. 12 in 2009)
  • Shelden Williams (No. 5 in 2006)
  • Daniel Ewing (No. 32 in 2005)
  • Dahntay Jones (No. 20 in 2003)
  • Mike Dunleavy (No. 3 in 2002)
  • Jay Williams (No. 2 in 2002)
  • Chris Carrawell (No. 41 in 2000)

That’s 12-of-21 – a 57 percent hit rate.

By comparison, here are players drafted from North Carolina in the same span:

Lived up to expectations

  • Harrison Barnes (No. 7 in 2012)
  • John Henson (No. 14 in 2012)
  • Tyler Zeller (No. 17 in 2012)
  • Ed Davis (No. 13 in 2010)
  • Tyler Hansbrough (No. 13 in 2009)
  • Ty Lawson (No. 18 in 2009)
  • Wayne Ellington (No. 28 in 2009)
  • Danny Green (No. 46 in 2009)
  • Brandan Wright (No. 8 in 2007)
  • Brendan Haywood (No. 20 in 2001)

Didn’t live up to expectations

  • Reggie Bullock (No. 25 in 2013)
  • Kendall Marshall (No. 13 in 2012)
  • Reyshawn Terry (No. 44 in 2007)
  • David Noel (No. 39 in 2006)
  • Marvin Williams (No. 2 in 2005)
  • Raymond Felton (No. 5 in 2005)
  • Sean May (No. 13 in 2005)
  • Rashad McCants (No. 14 in 2005)
  • Joseph Forte (No. 21 in 2001)

The Tar Heels are 10-for-19 – 53 percent.

Nobody would reasonably shy from drafting players from North Carolina, and they’ve fared worse than Duke players. Making snap judgments about Duke players just because they went to Duke is foolish.

Jackson is talking about a different time, when aside from Hill, Duke had a long run of first-round picks failing to meet expectations:

  • Roshown McLeod (No. 20 in 1998)
  • Cherokee Parks (No. 12 in 1995)
  • Bobby Hurley (No. 7 in 1993)
  • Christian Laettner (No. 3 in 1992)
  • Alaa Abdelnaby (No. 25 in 1990)
  • Danny Ferry (No. 2 in 1989)

Then, it was fair to question whether Mike Krzyzewski’s coaching yielded good college players who didn’t translate to the pros. But there have been more than enough counterexamples in the years since to dismiss that theory as bunk or outdated.

Count this as another example of Jackson sounding like someone who shouldn’t run an NBA team in 2015.

To be fair, the Knicks had a decent offseason, at least once you acknowledge they couldn’t land a star (which was kind of supposed to be Jackson’s job, right?).

The questions Knicks fans must ask themselves: Do you trust Jackson because of the moves he has made or worry about the next move because of what he has said?

Nets sign Wayne Ellington to one-year deal

Wayne Ellington, Nerlens Noel
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The Nets have signed veteran shooting guard Wayne Ellington to a one-year deal, the team announced in a press release. The New York Post‘s Tim Bontemps reports that the deal is for $1.5 million, coming out of Brooklyn’s taxpayer midlevel exception:

The Nets don’t have much more room to make moves after re-signing Brook Lopez and Thaddeus Young to huge deals, but they’ve done a nice job adding ancillary pieces for cheap. Ellington is a career 38.2 percent three-point shooter, and the Nets don’t have much outside shooting, so this is a good fit.

Lakers’ Wayne Ellington out for the season with shoulder injury

Los Angeles Lakers v Phoenix Suns

The Lakers have been decimated yet again this season, with Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash and rookie Julius Randle being the most prominent to suffer season-ending injuries.

Nick Young may be in the same situation, though the team has yet to officially rule him out the rest of the way, even though he’s missed the last 19 games with a knee injury and Byron Scott has been favoring using lineups that feature more unproven players.

The latest blow came on Thursday, when it was revealed that Wayne Ellington, too, will miss the remainder of the year due to injury.

The official release:

Lakers guard Wayne Ellington, who was injured in the fourth quarter of last night’s game against the New Orleans Pelicans at STAPLES Center, had an MRI exam today which confirmed a grade 1 shoulder separation.  Ellington will miss the remainder of the season.

In 65 games (36 starts) this season, Ellington averaged 10.0 points, 3.2 rebounds, 1.6 assists, and 0.5 steals in 25.8 minutes per game. The six year NBA veteran set single-game career marks in points (28), rebounds (10), assists (six), and field goals made (12) in 2014-15.

With eight games left to go in the regular season, the Lakers are just one loss shy of tying last season’s franchise-worst mark for futility. For one of the league’s most storied franchises, April 15 can’t come quickly enough.