Tag: Washington Wizards

2015 NBA Rookie Photo Shoot

Miami’s Justise Winslow signs with Adidas


Adidas may be getting out of the NBA uniform game, but they are opening up the checkbook to stock their roster with quality players that will get the public’s eye. Most notable this summer, they landed James Harden, pulling him away from Nike. He joins stars such as Derrick Rose, Damian Lillard, and John Wall, not to mention up-and-coming players such as Andrew Wiggins.

Now you can add Justise Winslow to the mix.

The No. 10 pick of the Miami Heat, he signed a shoe deal with Adidas, the company announced.

“I’m excited to be a part of adidas,” said Winslow. “I loved playing in their basketball shoes at adidas Nations and what they’ve been doing with Kanye and Originals is changing the game. I pride myself in being the best player on the court and having unique style off it and adidas will definitely help me do both.”

Adidas Nations is the shoe brand’s big annual high school player camp and games, where many of the nation’s top young ballers come play.

Winslow looked good at that game, then in the draft landed in a spot where he should get some run and be a key part of what the Heat do this season. Winslow’s game showed it needs work at Summer League, but his athleticism and defense are things Erik Spoelstra will put to use well off the bench immediately. Plus he can dunk and will show up on some highlights from the start. He could grow into a quality player in a popular market.

Which is just what Adidas is looking for.


Report: Wizards signing 7-footer Jaleel Roberts

North Carolina-Asheville v Duke

The NBA is experiencing a small-ball revolution, teams more committed than ever to forgoing height in favor of shooting, ball-handling and agility.

But size still creates opportunities for players.

That’s why someone who averaged 7.1 points, 5.2 rebounds and 2.5 blocks per game as a UNC-Asheville senior is getting an NBA contract.

Shams Charania of RealGM:

The Wizards already have 15 players, the regular-season roster limit, with guaranteed contracts. So, it’s unlikely Roberts lasts past the preseason.

Washington also doesn’t have its own D-League affiliate. So, the Wizards didn’t sign him to waive him and assign his D-League rights.

Most likely, they just want another big body for practice to limit the wear and tear on Marcin Gortat (31), Nene (32) and Drew Gooden (33). Washington needs to save its veterans for the regular season and playoffs.

But if the Wizards clear a guaranteed contract – maybe by trading Garrett Temple – and Roberts impresses, maybe he could stick. Washington typically likes to have an open roster spot, but because Roberts’ deal is unguaranteed, he wouldn’t limit flexibility.

Bucks GM touts Giannis Antetokounmpo’s ability to play center

Giannis Antetokounmpo

Bucks coach Jason Kidd kicked around the idea of playing Giannis Antetokounmpo at point guard last year, though didn’t really go anywhere beyond the preseason. Antetokounmpo spent most of his minutes on the wing.

He could reach the other end of the positional spectrum this season.

Milwaukee general manager John Hammond on The Baseline NBA Podcast (hat tip: Frank Madden of Brew Hoop):

I love the thought of small-ball for us. Potentially, if there’s ever a matchup situation where you say “OK, they’re going to go small, how do we match up with that”” whoever that team may be, I think you play Giannis Antetokounmpo at center. And he’s 6-foot-11, so it’s not really small-ball per se, but his ball skills and know-how of how to play will give us the ability to do that. And I think that could be a really fun team to watch someday if you do look at small-ball theory.

Antetokounmpo played 98% of his minutes last season with at least one teammate – Zaza Pachulia, Larry Sanders, John Henson, Johnny O’Bryant, Miles Plumlee, Kenyon Martin, Ersan Ilyasova – who was clearly more of a center than him. Even in the other 2%, Antetokounmpo didn’t handle center responsibilities clearly more frequently than players like Jared Dudley and Jabari Parker.

So, this would be a big shift for the third-year player.

But Antetokounmpo has the tools to make it work. He has tremendous length and good shot-blocking timing. The Bucks like to switch and trap, so he wouldn’t have to defend like a traditional center, either. Offensively, he could pull opposing bigs all the way to the 3-point arc and slash and dish against a strained defense.

Antetokounmpo doesn’t have the bulk to play center over long stretches, but against the right opponents, he could do it. As the league gets smaller, it’s a nice option for Milwaukee.

And it’s darn sure exciting to watch a player who can legitimately play any position 1-5.