Tag: Tyshawn Taylor

Amir Johnson; Mirza Teletovic; Alan Anderson

The book that helped Shaun Livingston (and maybe saved the Nets’ season)


The Brooklyn Nets started Shaun Livingston for seven of eight games in November when Deron Williams was out injured, and it went pretty poorly.

Livingston shot just 34 percent, and the Nets went 1-6 before replacing him in the starting lineup with Tyshawn Taylor.

That’s when Livingston received Hermann Hesse’s book “Siddhartha” – a tale of a never-ending quest for enlightenment.

Livingston, via Tim Bontemps of the New York Post:

“[Nets basketball operations manager Matt] Riccardi gave it to me,” Livingston said after the Nets’ 108-102 win over the 76ers on Monday. “I was going through [some struggles] in December. … I’m a thinker, and I was in my head. I was struggling, and I was struggling mentally more than anything, and that will carry over to the games.

“That was a great book, man. [It’s about] a guy kind of finding himself. … He had to go through the different experiences to find himself, because he was searching for peace. It was a great book.

“You kind of put yourself in that position where you’re like, ‘That’s me,’ you know?” Livingston said, referring to the book’s main character. “But it kind of just helps on the court, I think. Mentally it kind of stabilizes you. You’re like, ‘All right. Nothing else matters. This is just a game,’ and you take all the pressure out of it.

“What I went through [with the injury] was kind of real life. … This is a game. Now, we get paid to do it, people’s jobs are on the line, you understand that. … I understand the professional part of it, the business part of it. But I get more out of it by thinking about it as a game and something you have fun with.”

Phil Jackson famously gave his players books to read, and although current teams can’t emulate everything that made Jackson a great coach, they can at least do that.

It’s easy to see why Livingston related to the main character.

Livingston been searching for his NBA enlightenment ever since a horrific knee injury in 2007 threatened to end his career. After making a remarkable comeback, Livingston has bounced around the league, playing for the Heat, Thunder, Wizards, Bobcats, Bucks, Wizards (again), Cavaliers and now Nets.

Getting knocked from the starting lineup could have lowered Livingston’s resolve to keep searching. Instead, with “Siddhartha” guiding him, he kept looking.

Livingston got another chance to start when Williams got hurt again, and this time, he’s played much better. He’s shot 47 percent, scored more, rebounded more, gotten more steals and is just generally having his best season since the knee injury. Since returning, Deron Williams has even come off the bench behind Livingston.

Best of all, the Nets are 11-4 in their last 15 games with Livingston starting all of them. He hasn’t singlehandedly turned around their season, but he’s been instrumental. Brooklyn has improved because several small pieces have come together, and without any of them – Livingston’s resurgence included – it’s possible the Nets’ season would have spiraled further into despair.

Is this enlightenment for Livingston? Maybe.

If not, he’ll keep searching.

Pelicans waive Tyshawn Taylor, who was acquired in trade from Nets

tyshawn taylor nets

The Nets made a couple of trades over the weekend, likely aimed at both upgrading their backup point guard position as well as creating an open roster spot.

One of the deals involved sending Tyshawn Taylor to the Pelicans along with cash for the rights to Edin Bavcic, a 29-year old Bosnian big man who was originally drafted back in 2006 by the Raptors, and may or may not ever play in the NBA.

The Pelicans clearly were in that deal for the money and nothing else, as they waived Taylor on Wednesday, according to a report from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

The Wizards did something similar earlier this season, when they waived Kendall Marshall and Shannon Brown immediately after acquiring them (along with Marcin Gortat) in a trade with the Phoenix Suns. It’s an interesting way to make moves under the more restrictive collective bargaining agreement, but it can leave fringe players like Taylor (and Marshall before him, before catching on with the injury-ravaged Lakers) in a difficult situation.

Taylor was selected by the Nets in the second round of the 2012 draft, and holds career averages of  2.9 points, 0.9 assists and 0.4 steals in 61 games. He averaged 11.7 minutes per contest in 29 appearances for Brooklyn this season, before falling out of the rotation in mid-December.

Trade is official: Nets get Marquis Teague, Bulls land Tornike Shengalia

Chicago Bulls v Washington Wizards - NBA Global Games Rio 2013

We told you this trade was coming last Friday night, now it is official:

The Chicago Bulls have sent Marquis Teague to the Brooklyn Nets in exchange for Tornike Shengalia, the teams have announced.

What the Bulls get is money — the little-used Shengalia can and will be let go after this season. Teague is owed $1.1 million next season then there are the team option years on his rookie deal after that. The Bulls had thrown in the towel on Teague — Derrick Rose is out for the year but reserve point guard Teague last got on the court for Chicago on Christmas Day (and that was for two minutes). Teague has gotten run in the D-league, that’s about it.

Brooklyn is a fresh start for Teague. He will play behind Deron Williams and if he plays well he will get minutes (allowing more Shaun Livingston next to D-Will), but the Nets are rolling right now and if Teague isn’t performing well he’ll just be sitting on a different bench.

The other part of that trade (a separate deal but tied with the Teague deal) the Nets sent Tyshawn Taylor to New Orleans for cash and the draft rights to Edin Bavcic (who likely never plays in the NBA).

This saves the Nets a little cash the second half of this season, but what it really does is free up a roster spot if the Nets want to use the disabled player exception they got through the Brook Lopez injury. The Nets may not go there but they can if they choose now.

Report: Nets finalizing trades with Bulls and Pelicans to free up roster spot

tyshawn taylor nets

The Brooklyn Nets are reportedly close to making two separate trades that will be of little consequence to their product on the court, or to the average fan.

But they may be setting themselves up for something bigger in the future.

The Nets are finalizing a trade with the Bulls that would send Tornike Shengalia to Chicago in exchange for Marquis Teague, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

A separate deal with the Pelicans (also reported by Wojnarowski) has Brooklyn sending Tyshawn Taylor to New Orleans with cash in exchange for a future draft pick.

The latter move is likely of more interest, since it creates a roster spot that could allow the Nets to use the disabled player exception they were granted when Brook Lopez was lost for the season due to injury.

There’s a prohibitive cost associated with using that $5.25 million exception to go out and get some additional talent, likely in the $16-$20 million range when luxury tax penalties are considered. But the team applied for it for a reason, and it would appear they are making these moves in case an opportunity to add another piece presents itself.

Taylor averaged 3.9 points and 1.6 assists in 11.7 minutes per game for Brooklyn this season, while appearing in 23 contests. He had fallen out of the rotation since the middle of December, however, and will be remembered most for his role in the drink-spilling incident involving Jason Kidd that took place earlier this season.

Teague is a player similar in skill set to Taylor, and Shengalia didn’t play much at all for the Nets. But Brooklyn is taking on an additional year of guaranteed salary in order to add Teague to the roster.

Nets to try and get Disabled Player Exception for Lopez, add player to roster

Denver Nuggets v Brooklyn Nets

The Nets are capped out and have 15 guys on the roster — they cannot add another body under the NBA rules. However with Brook Lopez out for the season, they want to. Need to, really, when you consider the injury history of players on the roster.

So the Nets are going to file the paperwork for a Disabled Player Exception according to GM Billy King, as reported by Andy Vasquez of the Bergin Record.

What does that mean? Teams who are over the cap can apply for this exception to add a player when they lose one for the season (something a league doctor has to clear but will in the case of Lopez).

Who can they get? Straight from Larry Coon’s NBA CBA FAQ:

• The team may sign a free agent for one season only, for 50% of the disabled player’s salary or the amount of the Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception, whichever is less.

• The team may trade for a player in the last season of his contract only (including any option years), who is making no more than 50% plus $100,000 of the disabled player’s salary, or the amount of the Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception plus $100,000, whichever is less.

For the Nets, this means they can sign or trade for a player up to the midlevel exception of $5.15 million (half of Lopez’ salary is $7.35 million).

It should be noted that because the Nets have a full roster they would need to waive a player to make room for another one, even with the DPE (thanks to Devin Kharpertian of The Brooklyn Game for the reminder). They could waive Tyshawn Taylor, Tornike Shengelia or Alan Anderson but they still have to pay those guys’ fully guaranteed deals.

Getting the DPE is one thing, using it is another. They might like to bring in another big man, but the pickings out there are pretty slim (unless they have another future asset they might give up in a trade, but not many of those left). This gives the Nets flexibility but they don’t have a lot of good options right now.

And whatever this player signs for gets added to what is already the highest payroll and tax in the league — they will be pushing $190 million in salary and tax before this signing. But that doesn’t seem to faze Prokhorov.