Tag: Tyler Honeycutt

Los Angeles Clippers v Portland Trail Blazers

Wednesday And-1 links: Greg Oden looking at four teams this summer


Here is our regular look around the NBA — links to stories worth reading and notes to check out (stuff that did not get its own post here at PBT) — done in bullet point form. Because bloggers love bullet points.

• Greg Oden’s agent Mike Conley Sr. (yes, the father of the Memphis point guard) told Chris Tomasson of Fox Sports Florida that the center is still looking at four teams to sign with this summer — Miami, San Antonio, Cleveland and Charlotte. The smart money is still on Cleveland, but one should never rule out the temptations of Miami (and the sales job Pat Riley can do).

Who are the worst contracts in the NBA? Here’s a good list. And yes, Joe Johnson is on there.

• Here is a great story about Chris Wilcox and his efforts to get back from heart surgery. For athletes who got where they are pushing through barriers, it’s hard to go slow.

• The Hawks signed Shelvin Mack to a 10-day contract.

• It’s not just the basketball side of the NBA front offices that are using advanced stats, they are starting to use the same thing to target ticket sales. Which is if anything behind the curve of what other marketing businesses are doing.

• Lawrence Frank will not be coaching the Pistons Wednesday, he’s away from the team on a personal matter.

• Greg Monroe is also out for the Pistons on Wednesday.

• Lamar Odom dozed off in the hall this week outside his child support hearing. At least he didn’t do it in front of the judge.

• Speaking of courtrooms, Mark Cuban’s efforts to get an insider trading case against him thrown out of court fell short.

• Taj Gibson is planning to return sometime next week.

Doc Rivers feels for Philadelphia and what it’s been like to be without their star all season.

• It’s not really a surprise, but the Timberwolves plan to re-sign Nikola Pekovic this summer.

• Kareem Abdul-Jabbar says he would love to coach the Milwaukee Bucks. I imagine so. But he should have to do what Patrick Ewing and so many others have done first and spend years as an assistant coach, not just be given the gig.

• Nick Young’s new haircut is…. interesting.

• The brother of Donald Fehr — the respected head of the NHL’s players union — basically ruled out Fehr taking over the NBA players union for Billy Hunter.

• The Rockets let Tyler Honeycutt go to make way for Aaron Brooks on the roster.

• The Hawks have brought Mike Scott back from the D-League.

• Finally, Tyson Chandler has hooked up with a good cause — protecting elephants.

Winners and Losers from the Trade Deadline

Josh Smith

A good chunk of trades went down before the trade deadline, but it’s the deals that didn’t get made that loom large. Josh Smith is still an Atlanta Hawk, Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce are still Boston Celtics, Dwight Howard is still a Laker, Al Jefferson and Paul Millsap are still on the Jazz…you get the idea. Let’s look at the winners and losers from the trade deadline.

Winner: Milwaukee Bucks

Acquiring J.J. Redick from Orlando will help Milwaukee’s 24th ranked offensive efficiency and should lock up a playoff spot. That’s a pretty good deal considering Milwaukee didn’t have to part with any future draft picks. Acquiring Redick is a win-now move that has a slight chance of paying off later, especially if Monta Ellis opts out and Redick likes what he sees from Milwaukee these next few months.

Loser: J.J. Redick

Of course, Redick probably won’t like what he sees — primarily because he won’t see the ball. Redick has posted career highs in points per game and assists this season in an offense designed around him, but that won’t happen with Brandon Jennings and Monta Ellis chucking up shots all game. Going to a potential playoff team is a good thing, but there were so many other contenders (Chicago, Memphis, Denver) that likely could have boosted his value (and stats) much more.

Winner: Los Angeles Clippers

Sacrificing a good chunk of the future by trading Eric Bledsoe and DeAndre Jordan could have been disastrous. Simply by welcoming back Chauncey Billups and getting healthy, the Clippers improved as much as any of the contenders did at the deadline. Not making a panic trade was the right move.

Loser: Chicago Bulls

They didn’t improve, and they didn’t get under the tax. Accomplishing neither of those tasks is a pretty big failure — the Bulls couldn’t afford to do nothing in either regard.

Winner: New York Knicks

Freeing up a roster spot to sign Kenyon Martin to a 10-day contract and getting a future second rounder for Ronnie Brewer was a nice move, so long as it doesn’t mean Amar’e Stoudemire finds his way into the starting lineup. Martin, a noted coach killer, can also cause some problems, but we’ll give this a tentative win.

Loser: Brooklyn Nets

Not surprisingly, no team bit on the Kris Humphries/MarShon Brooks package. For a team clearly in win-now mode, accomplishing nothing at the deadline to try and shorten the gap hurts. Humphries was signed to that big 2-year, $24 million dollar contract to match salaries for a big move, but now it just looks kind of silly.

Winner: Portland Trailblazers

Acquiring Eric Maynor from Oklahoma City for a trade exception and the rights to Giorgio Printezis is a smart buy-low move for Portland. Even if Maynor never fully recovers from his knee injuries, he’s still a much better backup point guard option than Ronnie Price, who has been absolutely brutal this year. It’s a low risk, high reward move.

Loser: Sacramento Kings

Giving up on a top-5 draft pick after 800 minutes just to save a few bucks is painfully shortsighted, but that’s the issue of having lame duck decision makers in the organization. Patrick Patterson is a nice player, but Thomas Robinson will likely make this trade look very stupid for a very long time.

Winners: Thomas Robinson, Francisco Garcia, Tyler Honeycutt

Congrats, gentlemen. You were lucky enough to land a spot on the first lifeboat.

Losers: Patrick Patterson, Cole Aldrich, Toney Douglas

No one likes going from being a rotation player on a potential playoff team to a cellar dweller where the on-court product literally matters to no one.

Winner: Houston Rockets

They got the best asset in the trade in Robinson, a guy multiple teams apparently like. They also managed to shed salary off next year’s books, which could free up the money needed for Dwight Howard or another big free agent. It might not translate to the floor right away since Robinson is young and developing, but it’s an incredibly strong front office play.

Loser: Washington Wizards

It’s pretty hard to believe that the best assets Washington could get for Jordan Crawford was ancient center Jason Collins and out for the season guard Leandro Barbosa. Unless Crawford was awful in the locker room and was peer pressuring Bradley Beal into doing terrible things, it’s hard to commend the Wizards for this one.

Winner: Tobias Harris

Harris should get playing time on a young Orlando team that will be much more patient with him than Scott Skiles or Jim Boylan was. At just 20 years old, Harris has the potential to be a very solid rotation player in the future.

Losers: Josh McRoberts and Hakim Warrick

Agent: “Good news, you’ve been traded!”

Player: “That’s great! Ha — see ya suckers! I’m tired of being on this crappy team. So where am I headed?”

Agent: “Um…well…

Winner: Oklahoma City Thunder

Ronnie Brewer has been awful this year for the Knicks (he’s shooting 36.6 percent from the field), but Brewer has been a useful defender in the past. Sam Presti essentially swapped third string point guard Eric Maynor for Ronnie Brewer, and Brewer could prove useful in offense/defense substitutions with Kevin Martin. In a very limited role, he could be useful.

Loser: Atlanta Hawks

The Hawks ended up with nothing but a burned bridge for all this trouble (and Dahntay Jones, but whatever), and now they face the very real possibility of losing Josh Smith for nothing but cap room this offseason. You’d like to think that Milwaukee’s bevy of expiring contracts could have at least landed Atlanta a useful young prospect or future draft pick, but apparently Atlanta got cold feet. There are worse things than having a boat load of cap space, but Smith is too good of a player to just let walk away. Atlanta screwed this one up.

Winner: Anthony Morrow

One of the greatest shooters ever (I’m not exaggerating, look at the numbers) should get a chance at regular playing time again with the Dallas Mavericks. I’m irrationally excited about this.

Loser: Utah Jazz

How the Jazz didn’t trade Al Jefferson or Paul Millsap is absolutely baffling. They clearly have a logjam in the frontcourt with Derrick Favors and Enes Kanter needing more playing time, and Jefferson and Millsap are both on expiring deals. Does Utah really think they’re a free agent destination? Do they really think they have a shot at a championship this year as is? What a waste.

Winner: Philadelphia 76ers

I have no real opinion on acquiring Warriors guard Charles Jenkins, but I’m listing them as a winner for allowing us weekly looks at Andrew Bynum’s hairstyles.

Loser: Boston Celtics

I’m as sentimental as the next guy, and I realize trading franchise legend Paul Pierce is not easy. Don’t the Celtics have to get on with it eventually, though? I suppose they could get really lucky if Miami suffers injuries, but every year they let Pierce and Garnett get a little older, their trade value goes down. Getting Jordan Crawford for nothing was a nice move, though, given the direction they chose.

Winner: Mr. and Mrs. Morris

Having twins in the NBA must be a hassle. You have to pick your favorite child on a nightly basis and rack of a lot of airplane miles. No more! Phoenix has always loved getting the other brother (Robin Lopez, Taylor Griffin), but putting Marcus Morris and Markieff Morris together makes everyone a winner, so long as Rockets GM Daryl Morey airballs on the second round pick they had to give up.

Loser: Los Angeles Lakers

I think everyone expected some Mitch Kupchak magic at the deadline, even if it was acquiring a useful, smaller piece. Nope. For better or worse, the Lakers are going to ride this season out. I’ll guess worse.

The Extra Pass: Analyzing the Kings-Rockets Trade

Sacramento Kings v Boston Celtics

The Extra Pass is a column that’s designed to give you a better look at a theme, team, player or scheme. Today, we examine the trade between the Kings and the Rockets.

How often does a team save money and improve on the court in a trade?

That’s essentially what the Sacramento Kings did when they acquired Patrick Patterson, Cole Aldrich, Toney Douglas and cash from the Houston Rockets for Thomas Robinson, Francisco Garcia, Tyler Honeycutt and a second round pick on the eve of the trade deadline.

And if the world were to end sometime in June, this would be a good trade — maybe even a great trade — for Sacramento. The Kings shed about 3.7 million of salary this year (that’s prorated, mind you), pick up a million in cash, and get the best player in the deal right now in Patterson, a 23-year-old power forward who can fly up the court and stretch the floor.

Of course, the world isn’t ending in June — unless your last name is Maloof or Petrie. If all goes according to plan, longtime GM Geoff Petrie will be on a beach somewhere with his cellphone off, while the owners, Joe and Gavin Maloof, will finally (thankfully) be removed of basketball decision making power — something that would have happened long ago in a more just world. These are the final days for their basketball lives, and Rockets GM Daryl Morey just happened to stroll by their garage sale at sunset.

Of course, Morey is really good at this sort of thing, and so he walked right past all the junk Sacramento wanted to get rid of and instead went inside and found the newest, shiniest thing he could. And that shiny thing was this year’s 5th pick in the NBA Draft, Thomas Robinson.

The reason this trade stunned people around the league so much was because it was assumed the Kings bumbling management group wouldn’t have the cohesiveness or the power to muck things up, but somehow (unfortunately, we don’t get to hear about the side deals) they were able to convince the Seattle group that this was something that would be beneficial for everyone.

For the Maloofs, this move is nothing more than a self-serving cash grab that shouldn’t surprise anyone who has watched the relocation drama unfold. Even beginning to dissect the “basketball reasons” for Sacramento making this deal is a useless exercise — there is only one real motivation here.

Houston’s motivations aren’t entirely different. As Zach Lowe of Grantland notes, the Rockets will save 1.6 million in 2013-14, which could make all the difference in being able to offer a max contract. Of course it goes beyond that for Houston — Robinson is by far the best asset in the trade, even if you don’t think he’s capable of playing up to his draft slot. I’d be hesitant to label Robinson a bust despite his shaky play so far this year, as Sacramento isn’t exactly a breeding ground for young promising talent. There’s no “royal jelly” going on there, as David Thorpe would like to say.

Robinson could of course use more time (he’s played 809 career minutes), but even with below average early season numbers like 42 percent shooting and a PER of 10.8, Robinson already does one thing great, and that’s hitting the offensive glass. Robinson averages 4.1 offensive rebounds per36 minutes –a number that would lead you to believe he can be a valuable role player as an energy guy off the bench, if nothing else.

That’s where the deal makes sense for Houston. They had three years and 3,500 minutes to evaluate Patterson, and though I’m sure they appreciated the solid production he provided (15.6 PER, 16 points per36), they likely weren’t sold enough to pay him a real contract once his rookie deal expired next season. But in Robinson, Houston gets to reset the clock and enjoy three and a half seasons of production on a rookie deal, or alternatively, they’ll have a more valuable asset to flip at some point due to Robinson’s potential — something Sacramento’s management has no time or use for.

Although trading Patterson and moving Marcus Morris to Phoenix for a second round draft pick makes the Rockets a little less stretchy, it does make them more flexible with playing time. Fellow rookies Terrence Jones, Royce White and Donatas Motiejunas will eventually need playing time, and moving Aldrich clears up some PT for promising young big man Greg Smith. In Garcia, the Rockets also get some wing depth and a veteran 3 and D guy in the mold of Carlos Delfino without having to commit any future salary. Losing a player and clearing a roster spot is actually a great thing for Houston.

While the move might not be popular with the team right now or Kevin McHale, who I’m sure enjoyed having “veterans” like Patterson and Douglas to call on, it’s a great asset acquisition at a steep discount. Would the Kings have ever traded the 5th pick  for a package of Patterson, Aldrich and Douglas before the draft? Of course not. They would have laughed at that offer.

But now? Selling Robinson’s potential, something that’s not tangible to Sacramento’s management but is to Houston, sadly makes dollars and sense.

Trade Rumor Roundup: As deadline nears, lots of questions remain

Josh Smith

It is now just a little less than 13 hours until the NBA trade deadline and we have had all of one whopping trade. Which means it’s going to be a very busy Thursday… probably. There are going to be deals, guys we expect to get dealt will get dealt, but there may be fewer surprises as teams are still very reticent to take on more tax money.

Here is where things stand as of this late Wednesday night/Thursday morning post as we head into the final hours.

We have had one trade — last draft’s No. 5 pick Thomas Robinson, along with Francisco Garcia and Tyler Honeycutt plus a second round pick were sent to the Rockets from the Kings. In return, the Kings get Patrick Patterson, Cole Aldrich and Toney Douglas from the Rockets. In a related move Houston sent Marcus Morris to Phoenix (where he will now team up with his brother Markieff) for a second round pick.

For the Rockets, they get a serviceable rookie who should at least grow into a solid role player in Robinson, and they get most of his rookie deal. The Kings save a lot of money, which is what the Maloof family is into even if they are selling the Kings.

• Once and for all, the Lakers are not trading Dwight Howard or Pau Gasol. The Celtics are not trading Kevin Garnett and there isn’t a great market for Paul Pierce.

• Reports are the Josh Smith sweepstakes is down to the Suns, Bucks and Nets.

The Nets have been offering the same package — Kris Humphries, MarShon Brooks and a pick — to everyone for everything. So far the Hawks didn’t bite. The Celtics didn’t bite for Paul Pierce, the Bucks didn’t bite for Ersan Ilyasova, and it’s hard to see anyone really biting on that package.

The Bucks are offering deals mostly based around Monta Ellis and interestingly Smith said he wouldn’t rule out re-signing there this off-season. The Suns are offering Marcin Gortat, likely P.J. Tucker and some picks. It feels like the Hawks are going to make a move but are waiting to see if any of these deals gets sweetened before they make a move.

• J.J. Redick also is likely going to be moved before the deadline, the only question is where. Memphis, Indiana, Milwaukee, Chicago and Minnesota all have reportedly shown interest. And word has now come that the San Antonio Spurs are in the mix, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports. He ads that the Magic are not opposed to keeping Redick the rest of the season but that seems unlikely.

• The Bobcats are still shopping Ben Gordon around, trying to unload the guard and his $13 million salary for next year. However, Howard Beck of the New York Times reports the Nets are not interested. At all.

• The Jazz are still expected to move either Al Jefferson or Paul Millsap. One interesting possibility is a Millsap for Derrick Williams trade with Minnesota — that deal has been discussed.

• The Hornets are testing the waters for guard Eric Gordon. They had conversations with the Warriors about a swap for Klay Thompson, but I’m not sure how serious that really was. Plus, a lot of pieces would be needed to be added with Thompson to make the salaries work.

• The Timberwolves are willing to trade J.J. Barea and Luke Ridnour as well as Williams, reports Ken Berger of CBS.

• Dallas has put Rodrigue Beaubois, Brandan Wright and Dominique Jones out there for potential trades, but they only want picks, according to Ken Berger of CBSSports.com. What the Mavs do not want to do is take on more salary and mess with their cap space.

• The Knicks have shopped Ronnie Brewer around, reports ESPNNewYork.com.

• At Hoopsworld, the Pacers GM has shot down rumors that Danny Granger is available.

Rockets get Thomas Robinson from Kings in six-player deal

Sacramento Kings v Boston Celtics

If you, like me, thought the Kings were not going to make any trades at the deadline because of the pending potential sale of the team, we were wrong. Whatever happens with the Kings GM Geoff Petrie is a lame duck, yet here we are with a trade

The Kings have sent the No. 5 overall pick from the last draft, Thomas Robinson out of Kansas is going to get a fresh start down in Houston, first reported by Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports. The trade has since been confirmed by multiple sources.

The deal sends Robinson, Francisco Garcia and Tyler Honeycutt and a second round pick to the Rockets. The Kings get Patrick Patterson, Cole Aldrich and Toney Douglas. In a related move Houston sent Marcus Morris to Phoenix a second round pick (where he will now team up with his brother Markieff).

Robinson is the biggest name to most fans, but the rookie has struggled with the Kings. He’s averaged 4.8 points on 42.7 percent shooting and 4.7 rebounds a game. He has a PER of just 10.8, and with that production has come a drop in minutes the past month. Robinson tries to do too much — in college he was the man, the focal point, and he seems to be struggling to play within a role on a team where he is just a guy. He turns the ball over, tries to make passes and plays he shouldn’t. That said, he’s an inexpensive rookie with potential. This was pretty quick to give up on him.

There is plenty of time to grow into his game and at a good cost — he is in just the first year of his rookie deal and the Rockets get him for three years on the cheep. In fact, if the Rockets turn down the final year option for Garcia they will save $1.6 million in cap space for 2014 with this move.

But the real money savers here are the Kings, and by that we mean the Maloof family. They save about $4.5 million in salary (which will be less once prorated for the remainder of the season), they save money in future years as Aldrich has an expiring contract, plus they reportedly get a cool $1 million in cash. It was an ATM move for the cash-poor franchise.

Patterson provides the Kings more immediate help now for the Kings up front, he started 38 games for the Rockets this season giving them 11.6 points a game on 51.9 percent shooting, plus 4.7 rebounds a game. Patterson is a strong pick-and-pop guy forward shooting 37 percent from three and can knock down long twos as well. Patterson is a Kentucky guy who has a good relationship with DeMarcus Cousins.

The Kings also get Douglas, who has played solid ball for the Rockets off the bench, giving them 8.1 points a game. But it was really all about the money.