Tag: Ty Corbin

Utah Jazz v Dallas Mavericks

C.J. Miles and Raja Bell are not thrilled with Ty Corbin


Ty Corbin did a lot of things right in his first full season as the Utah Jazz’s head coach. Even though the Jazz were swept in convincing fashion by the Spurs in the 1st round, the team did make the playoffs the year after Hall-of-Fame coach Jerry Sloan left mid-season and superstar point guard Deron Williams was traded at the deadline, which is no mean feat, especially considering that Derrick Favors, the centerpiece of the trade that sent Williams to New Jersey, appears to be making good progress under Corbin.

Still, not every Jazz player was thrilled with Corbin at the end of the season. Brian T. Smith of the Salt Lake Tribune has the story:

Raja Bell

Bell does not expect to return to Jazz next year.

Bell hopes the Jazz do the right thing and move him before the 2012-13 season. He was open to it before the trade deadline but never asked for trade.

Bell said Corbin was “unprofessional” at the end of the season. According to Bell, Corbin made things personal by playing everyone in the playoffs except for him and it was obvious.

Bell said if he’s still on Jazz at the start of next season “we’ll cross that bridge” then.

C.J. Miles

Miles said the team was put off by Al Jefferson’s pre-Game 4 comments about no one beating the Spurs in the playoffs and San Antonio being better than Utah.

Miles loves the Jazz, the team’s fans and thinks Corbin will evolve. But he never knew what was expected of him this year.

Miles said communication was much better with former coach Jerry Sloan, and Corbin has struggled relaying his message to team.

Miles: “I don’t even remember us naming a captain, but they wanted leadership.”

Miles wanted to play in Game 4 but said he wasn’t allowed to.

The 35-year old Bell, who has always been a role player, probably wouldn’t have done much to prevent the sweep in anybody’s wildest imagination, but the fact that he was the only player not to get on the court for the Jazz does seem to show that Corbin doesn’t have much of a personal relationship with him. Miles is just 25, but he’s also a role player on the court for the Jazz, so it wouldn’t seem like he would have much leverage if he forced the Jazz to choose between him and their coach.

Miles is an unrestricted free agent this summer, and Bell’s 3.5 million dollar contract expires after the 2012-13 season.

Jazz’s Al Jefferson says everything good with him, coach

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After he was benched the entire fourth quarter a few nights ago — where he had good seats to watch Derrick Favors lead a comeback — Al Jefferson waived off reporters and was clearly frustrated. Since he didn’t even get put back in for overtime when other players did, the reasoning seemed clear.

But it’s all good. We don’t know why you even think there’s a problem with him and new coach Ty Corbin. That’s what he told the Deseret News. As always, it’s the media making stuff up.

“(Coach) made a joke about it earlier,” he said, “and I kind of got upset because I really hate it when people put words in my mouth or say that I’m upset about something.”

“Besides this cold I got, I got no problem. I’m not upset about nothing, especially with coach,” Jefferson said. “I think coach is doing a wonderful job. I don’t know. I guess that just it — people don’t have nothing else to write about. They just want to make up some stuff. I don’t have no problem with coach.”

“I have a right to be upset. We just lost a game that we should’ve won,” Jefferson said. “I was more upset for the simple fact that the young guys played hard and get us back into the game and push it in overtime and lose, but not one time did I say I was upset with coach or anybody else.”

Jefferson talking to the media was purely coincidentally right after GM Kevin O’Conner said told the told the Utah media that players would speak to them because that’s part of the players job.

For the rest of the season, Jefferson may be watching a lot more and playing less. The Jazz are out of playoff contention and young guys like Favors are going to get a lot of run to try and develop the and get them used to the Jazz system. But Jefferson is good with that. He says so.

Nothing interim here, Jazz sign Tyrone Corbin to three-year deal

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When owner Greg Miller was speaking at the press conference following the resignation of Jerry Sloan, he was very clear — Tyrone Corbin was the new coach of the Jazz. Not interim coach. Just coach.

Now he has put his money where his mouth is, inking Corbin to a three-year deal. Terms of the deal were not released.

“I am confident that Tyrone is the right man to lead this team into the future.  He is someone with longstanding ties to the Jazz and this community, and who has embraced the core philosophies and ideals this organization holds true.  I feel that his character and leadership qualities will be true assets to the Jazz moving forward for many years to come,” Miller said in a released statement.

“Ty has 16 years of experience in this league as a player and has spent the last seven seasons working here as an assistant coach,” said Jazz general manager Kevin O’Connor said in the same statement.  “He is ready for this job and we feel certain he will excel as a head coach just as he excelled as an assistant coach and as a player.”

The Jazz are a rebuilding team, it’s a very different thing than what Sloan coached for many years. They got some nice pieces in the D-Will trade, but they are rebuilding. We will see how Corbin is able to deal with that.

What will the Jazz look like under Tyrone Corbin?

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When Tyrone Corbin Friday night starts to stand on the shoulders of Jerry Sloan (as owner Gail Miller said so eloquently Thursday), what will the Utah Jazz look like?

Well, probably not all that different at first. Even if Corbin wanted to overhaul the system — and as a long-time Jazz assistant that’s unlikely — you just can’t do that in the middle of the season. You can tweak the system you are running, but any real overhauls need to be put on hold. So expect a lot of flex sets in the half court.

But look for some differences. For example expect the Jazz to run more.

The Jazz are 20th in the NBA in possessions per game (and if you look at the Speed Index they are a little slower than that, even). Whether or not it was the reason Sloan stepped away, we know for sure Deron Williams wanted to run more and you can expect him to get more of a green light.

Which could be both good and bad, according to the amazing Sebastian Pruiti at NBA Playbook.

The Utah Jazz actually lead the league in points per possession in transition with a PPP of 1.231 on 63.1% shooting (also first in the league in transition).  However, despite the positive numbers, the Jazz don’t run all that much, with only 13.1% of their total possessions labeled as “transition” by Synergy Sports Technology, which is only the 11th most in the NBA…

Another reason why Sloan doesn’t want to run is because Deron Williams isn’t a very good point guard in transition.  Williams is posting a PPP of 1.16 when in transition which is 164th in the NBA.  This is due mostly to turnovers as Williams is turning the ball over on 15.5% of his individual transition possessions which is good for a ranking of 246th.

It’s an oddly mixed bag. But when you watch the video it appears that Williams wants to run so badly that he pushes into places he should not go.

A few seasons back the Lakers were playing uncharacteristically fast for a Phil Jackson team, because he realized he had some good athletes for transition. What he said to the team was basically “you have the first seven seconds of the shot clock to run and improvise some offense, but if nothing is there pull it out and set up the triangle.” I could see something like that working for the Jazz, where they have more freedom to run but with that comes the responsibility to pull out and set it up if nothing quality is there.

Friday night, in their first game under Corbin, the Jazz need to be careful. They are taking on the Suns — there are certain teams you do not want to get into a track meet with, this is one of them. The Jazz need to be careful about pushing any newfound freedoms too far in this one.

Aside that maybe there will be more high pick-and-rolls for Williams to work off of. There are standard NBA sets — double high-post “horns” for example — that virtually every NBA team runs and players are familiar with. Things that can relatively easily be slid into an offense.

But don’t expect Ty Corbin’s Jazz to look a whole lot different from Jerry Sloan’s Jazz. Not this season, anyway.

Jerry Sloan: “My time is up and I’d like to move on.”

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Friday night, for the first time since the Regan administration, Jerry Sloan is going to have a night off on the night of a Utah Jazz game. What is he going to do?

“I’ll be like a dizzy duck,” he said, a classically homespun like from Sloan at his exit press conference Thursday afternoon.

Thursday afternoon Jerry Sloan officially resigned as the head coach of the Utah Jazz, a job he has held since 1988 (and he was with the team as an assistant before that). Lead assistant Phil Johnson also stepped down. This was clearly an emotional time for the old-school coach known for being a hard ass.

“This is a little bit tougher than I thought it would be…” Sloan said. “The fans and this organization have been second to none.”

Sloan, 68, said he was stepping away and would not be taking a coaching job with another franchise.

When asked about his reasons Sloan came off as both forthright and protecting the locker room. Classic and classy, as one would expect of Sloan.

When asked about a confrontation with Deron Williams last night and any role that and other conflicts may have played, Sloan said he’s had confrontations with players since he started coaching and that was not the motivation for him to retire. Nor was it this team tuning him out, he said.

“I’ve never had a team that did everything I wanted it to on the court,” Sloan said. “That’s means the good teams and some of the teams that weren’t very good. I don’t think any coach bats 100 percent with his team day in and day out. And I don’t think it’s wrong for you wanting them to play that way. Sometimes that’s misleading I think with some players.”

Owner Greg Miller emphasized that this was Sloan’s decision alone, that no player or front office person was pushing him out.

“Up until about 10 minutes ago, we tried to talk Jerry and Phil out of leaving,” Miller said.

Being pushed out and Sloan deciding to walk away because he could read the writing on the wall and did not have the energy for another fight are two different things. When pressed as to why he retired midseason, Sloan continually came back to feeling like he just didn’t have the energy

“My time is up and I’d like to move on….” Sloan said, “I’ve always thought about when am I going to retire, how is that going to happen. There’s always a feeling that hits you, it seems to me, that’s a little bit similar to the one I had when I got fired. So, I had a feeling it was time for me to move on.”

At the same press conference, Ty Corbin was introduced as the new Jazz head coach. There is no interim attached to his title. But Corbin tried to deflect the moment.

“For me this is a bittersweet moment….” Corbin said. “I had no idea going into shootaround yesterday, the game last night and the shootaround today that Jerry and Phil would be leaving us.”

Praise has started to pour in from Sloan, including from NBA Commissioner David Stern.

“Few people have epitomized all the positives of team sports more than Jerry Sloan.  A basketball lifer, Jerry was as relentless in his will to win on the sidelines for the Utah Jazz as he was as an All-Star guard for the Chicago Bulls. In over two decades as a coach, he taught his players that nothing was more important than the team.  His most impressive qualities were his leadership and his extraordinary ability to encourage his players to subjugate their individual games for the benefit of the whole. Two trips to The Finals and over 1,200 regular-season victories more than validate his philosophy. Jerry moves on having established himself as one of the greatest and most respected coaches in NBA history. I and the rest of the NBA family wish him great success and happiness as he moves to the next chapter of his life.”