Tag: Twitter

Blake Griffin Kendrick Perkins

Kendrick Perkins says he deleted his twitter because of “too much negativity”


Kendrick Perkins has gained some national attention recently thanks to his strong words about LeBron James’ twitter reaction to Blake Griffin’s play-of-the-year dunk on Perkins, and his feelings towards “elite” NBA players on twitter in general. Perkins deletehavd his twitter shortly before he made his statements, and recently there have been some insinuations that Perkins deleted his twitter because of Griffin’s earth-shattering throwdown.

Today, Daily Thunder’s Royce Young took to twitter to set the record straight:

Perk deleted his Twitter on Dec. 29. I talked to him about it on Dec. 30 and he explained why: http://www.dailythunder.com/2011/12/oklahoma-city-throttles-phoenix-107-97/

Griffin’s dunk on Perkins, and James’ tweet, both happened on January 30th, so it looks like Perkins’ deletion of his twitter wasn’t a reaction to anything Griffin did or James tweeted. From the Daily Thunder article linked in Mr. Young’s tweet, here’s Perkins’ explanation of why he deleted his twitter:

I talked to [Perkins] about his Twitter and he said he deleted it because there was just too much negativity. He also said he didn’t think he could keep his mouth shut. “I don’t think Sam Presti liked me on there too much,” he said. “I’m serious.”

LeBron has no appologies for Perkins, tweeting about dunk

Sweat rolls down the face of Miami Heat's James during a break in play against Milwaukee Bucks in their NBA game in Milwaukee

Kendrick Perkins didn’t like LeBron James tweeting about how Blake Griffin dunked all over Perk. Not in the least. Perkins said that you don’t see Kobe Bryant tweeting, or Jordan, or guys that play the game “for the right reasons” who want to win not get hung up on one play.

In response, our man Ira Winderman of the Sun Sentinel asked LeBron if he’s sorry about the tweet.

“For me, social media and Twitter is all about connecting with your fans,” James said. “From day one, that’s why I got to Twitter, to connect to my fans. I would never apologize for anything like that when I’m connecting with my fans…

“I can see why he may have felt embarrassed,” he said. “I don’t think I was the only one that reacted to that unbelievable play by Blake, and that’s what it was all about, me acknowledging how great of a play it was. If Kendrick Perkins had dunked on somebody else on the other end, I would have done the same thing.

“I’m an easy target, let’s leave it at that.”

LeBron is right about this — a whole lot of NBA players were tweeting about the dunk. It blew up twitter and went viral almost instantly, before the game was over. If Perkins is going to be mad at guys for tweeting about that dunk, it’s going to be a long list.

But LeBron doesn’t touch the larger issue — that the tweet was about LeBron co-opting a big moment to make it about himself. That his use of twitter is about his need for attention. That LeBron cares about himself first and winning second. Those are the big knocks, the big issues LeBron did not try to refute. He probably doesn’t even see it that way, but a lot of others do.

NBA takes to Twitter to… well, we’re not sure why


The NBA announced on Sunday night they would take questions from people on Twitter and David Stern and Adam Silver would answer them. What followed was a series of refutations from players and repetition of talking points they’ve been spewing for months. It was neither productive, insightful, nor revealing. It did not harness the power of social media, and only served to push the one-sided agenda they’ve been pursuant to for months.

So, no, it didn’t go great.

And that was it.
It was a noble idea. Reach the fans directly, communicate the league’s position, leverage social media. It just came across as more baseless rhetoric, more noise in a white sea of context-less nonsense. The league could have elaborated more on the specifics of the deal, shown how it isn’t as bad as the players have made it out to be. Instead they just said “No, it’s not!” and that was all.
The rhetoric continues as tomorrow’s doomsday clock ticks shorter.