Tag: Trey Burke

2015 NBA Draft

PBT’s live pick-by-pick NBA Draft instant analysis post


The rumors have been flying and the smoke has been particularly thick this year — after the No. 1 pick just about anything can happen in the 2015 NBA Draft. Expect a lot of trades, plenty of surprises, and a few head scratchers.

This is the best place to follow all of it.

We will be constantly updating this post throughout the course of the night — it will be live with a quick analysis of their game and how they fit in with the team that took them. We’ll also keep up to date with the picks that get traded and make sure you know where they land.

Now on with one of the best nights on the NBA calendar.


source:  1. Timberwolves: Karl-Anthony Towns, 6’11” center (Kentucky). He’s a good player now who could be a great player in a few years, and should fit perfectly with Andrew Wiggins, Ricky Rubio and the rest of the Minnesota core. He’s got an NBA body and he’s athletic — he moves more like a wing than a big, especially with the ball in his hands. He can defend — on the ball he is solid, and he can come from off the ball and block shots. Offensively he’s strong scoring in the post but he shoots 82 percent from the free throw line and shows signs he could have an impressive midrange game and, eventually, all the way out to the three-point line. Best yet, he’s got Kevin Garnett as a mentor for at least the next season.
source:  2. Lakers: D’Angelo Russell, 6’5” point guard (Ohio State). The Lakers see Russell as someone who could be a big star in the league. He can score — 19.3 points per game — and shoot — 41 percent from 3 at Ohio State — but more than that is a gifted passer with phenomenal court vision. He’s also a big guard. However, there are doubters. He is not a dynamic athlete and that could be an issue at the NBA level where he will face those guys a lot of nights. Also, against quality teams he was considerably less effective. Is this a bet the Lakers can land DeMarcus Cousins or, more likely, LaMarcus Aldridge?
source:  3. 76ers: Jahlil Okafor, 6’11” center (Duke). The Sixers take the best guy left on the board, but they are loaded up front and you have to wonder if this is this a prelude to a trade (not Okafor but someone)? Okafor is as polished and skilled a post player and scorer as has come out of the college game since maybe Tim Duncan — he is going to put up points as a rookie in the NBA. He has spectacular footwork, is phenomenal with his back to the basket. His passing has improved but still needs work. Questions remain about his defense and effort on that end of the floor, but his issues down there were overstated.
source:  4. Knicks: Kristaps Porzingis, 7’0” power forward (Latvia), The Knicks are taking on player development (unless this is a draft for another team in a trade). Porzingis is the most talked about guy on the board. He is tall and long (7’6” wingspan) plus he moves fairly fluidly on the court. He’s a good shooter with NBA-three range. He’s the definition of upside (and his floor is pretty much a solid role player), but he’s also a project. It’s going to be three years before the Knicks know what they’ve got. We’ve broken his game down in more detail here.
source:  5. Magic: Mario Hezonja, 6’8” shooting guard (Croatia). Another quality young player — and finally a shooter — added to the Magic roster. Potentially the best two guard/swingman in this draft. He has good skills for a 20-year-old — smooth shooting stroke, good defensive instincts, a high level of athleticism — but it’s that he has just started to tap his potential that had scouts drooling. He’s a big two guard who moves well, and has decent handles — he could add a slashing game to his outside shooting. There is also real defensive potential. He’s exceedingly confident, which worries some observers. He also just needs more time on the court to develop his feel for the game and consistency.
source:  6. Kings: Willie Cauley-Stein, 7’0” center (Kentucky): Will George Karl like this center? He’s very athletic, but he’s getting drafted this high because of his defense — he’s a 7-footer who can show out off a pick and switch onto a guard without losing a beat. His offense is raw, poor if you want, but he can score in transition and finish around the rim, and maybe eventually have a jumper. If you like raw, long, athletic big men he’s the best in this draft. There are concerns about his foot, which was operated on more than a year ago and scared off some teams. Also, Cauley-Stein and DeMarcus Cousins means no shooters to space the floor as big men, teams will pack the paint.
source:  7. Nuggets: Emmanuel Mudiay, 6’5” point guard (United States/China). He passed up playing at SMU for Larry Brown and played in China, but he handled that professionally. After missing a lot of time due to an ankle injury, he did his rehab and made plays come the playoffs (that he stuck with it in a foreign land shows maturity). He is a big, strong, physical guard who uses that strength to try and get to the rim, especially in transition. His ability to read the play and find teammates when he drives improved playing in China. His jump shot needs to improve, and it’s hard to get a read on his defense because nobody plays any in China. This is another sign Ty Lawson will be gone from Denver.
source:  8. Pistons. Stanley Johnson, 6’8” small forward (Arizona). They needed a small forward in Detroit and they got a good one. He comes with an NBA body, but his offensive game is going to need some polish — particularly his jumper — to get to the NBA level or get a lot of minutes in a Stan Van Gundy offense. He also wasn’t great finishing around the rim against length. He has the potential to be be an impressive NBA player, he’s just a little bit of a project at the start.
source:  9. Hornets: Frank Kaminsky, 7’0” center (Wisconsin): They wanted a new four of the future, one who can space the floor, and they found it. He was the rock at the middle of Wisconsin’s run to the Final Four again, and he was as good a college player as there was last season. He is skilled, and is comfortable playing on the block or out on the perimeter. He’s not athletic by NBA standards but has great footwork that can get him space to score, he could be a real pick-and-pop threat for the Hornets. However, as a senior don’t expect a ton of development from him.
source:  10. Heat: Justise Winslow, 6’7” small forward (Duke). This is a steal for the Heat here and a perfect fit. He has an NBA body already, is physically strong and athletic, and he can defend at an NBA level now — and he can defend multiple positions. He’s good on the glass for his size. He showed some versatility to his offense at Duke, but he played a small four in college, can he create shots for himself against NBA threes? He shot 41 percent from three last season but there are questions if he can continue that at the next level.
source:  11. Pacers: Myles Turner, 6’11” center (Texas). Roy Hibbert who? Turner comes with an NBA-ready center’s body, tall and with a solid frame. He’s climbed draft boards thanks to his shooting touch (he can hit threes) and his high IQ game — he reads plays well. The concern is he doesn’t move really well and had an odd running gate, which have looked better in workouts, according to scouts, but is still a bit of a concern.
source:  12. Jazz: Trey Lyles, 6’10” power forward (Kentucky). This is more depth up front behind Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors. He’s an NBA four who was asked to play more at the three at Kentucky because of the Wildcats’ depth. He’s got a fantastic scoring touch and pretty good footwork and handles, he can face up or back down smaller defenders. He has a nice floater. He needs to develop a more consistent jump shot. Defensively he needs to improve his footwork and show more focus.

source:  13. Suns: Devin Booker, 6’5” shooting guard (Kentucky). Real steal for the Suns this far down the draft, he’s better than some of the guys above him and a great fit for up-tempo Phoenix. Also, with the Suns, you can’t get wrong with the best shooter in the draft and that’s what Booker may be. He can knock it down off the bounce or off the catch. He’s not as athletic as a lot of the guys he will match up at the two guard, but he defended well at Kentucky.
source:  14. Thunder: Cameron Payne, 6’2” point guard (Murray State). Fantastic pick for a team looking for point guard depth. He’s not an elite athlete but he does have a fantastic feel for the game and those kinds of point guards have done well in the league in recent years. He’s got a great change of pace, uses it to get into the lane and knows how to distribute. He has three-point range. He likely is a solid backup point guard.
source:  15. Wizards: Kelly Oubre, 6’7” small forward (Kansas). The Hawks picked him but traded him to the Washington Wizards (for pick No. 19 and two second rounders). Now, can the Wizards develop him, because if so, they may have steal at this point in the draft. Oubre is a project wing player. He is a freak athlete (as good as anyone in this class) who is long, has good scoring instincts, and has potential as a jump shooter. Right now he’s a straight-line driver who gets lost defensively. He needs time on the court — expect him to get some time in the D-League.
source:  16. Celtics: Terry Rozier, 6’2” point guard (Louisville). This is an unexpectedly high pick, he was expected to go late first and Boston is loaded with guards. Rozier is a guy that just knows how to score, and can do it working on or off the ball. His shot selection needs work, and he thinks shoot first, and his distribution skills improved but are still a work in progress. He’s pesky on defense when he wants to be, he just doesn’t always want to, but his defensive numbers are good. He could develop into a rotation player.
source:  17. Bucks: Rashad Vaughn, 6’5” shooting guard (UNLV). He climbed up the board in recent weeks to this spot, a lot of teams like him. He’s coming off a torn meniscus (from February) and he was not efficient overall, nor was his shot selection, something that Jason Kidd will improve. But you could see the guy that was such a highly touted prospect in flashes. He shot 38 percent from three, he likes to attack off the dribble, and he has the tools to be a very good defender. With some development he could be a quality player in the league.
source:  18. Rockets: Sam Dekker, 6’9” small forward (Wisconsin). The Rockets were looking for help at the three, this fits with that. He gained a lot of fans as one of the key players that led Wisconsin past Kentucky to the NCAA title game. He’s got the athleticism to play the three in the NBA and is good at a lot of skills (but is elite at none). He can put the ball on the floor to create a look, he’s fluid on the drive. However, he shot an inconsistent 33 percent from three in college and the Rockets love the three ball, that will need to improve. There also are questions about his defense.
source:  19. Knicks: Jerian Grant, 6’5” point guard (Notre Dame). This was the Wizards’ pick, which they will trade to the Hawks (No. 15 pick), who will move it on it on to the Knicks for Tim Hardaway Jr. Grant was one of the top two seniors in this NBA draft (along with Frank Kaminsky of Wisconsin), and has a mature game. He’s aggressive and smart on the pick-and-roll, knowing how to find shooters, but he can over dribble and take too long to get into the offense. He’s a solid defender. He could play a little two in the right situation.
source:  20. Raptors: Delon Wright, 6’6” point guard (Utah). This is a good pickup toward the end of the first round. He’s a big point guard who defends the position well. He uses his athleticism to get into the lane, he finished well against Pac 12 defenses, and he has good court vision and can find shooters. His jump shot needs to find some consistency, and there are questions about his ability to finish against NBA length. But he can give the Raptors minutes from the start and maybe develop into a starter.
source:  21. Mavericks: Justin Anderson, 6’6” small forward (Virginia). Highly touted out of high school, in three years at Virginia he never really developed as scouts had hoped. He’s athletic and can defend, he can finish at the rim and hit 46.5 percent from three last season. He has potential as a “3 and D” guy in the NBA.

source:  22. Bulls: Bobby Portis, 6’11” power forward (Arkansas). They just drafted a great high energy, Tom Thibodeau kind of guy. Welp. Bulls fans are going to like this guy because he plays hard and outworks guys at both ends of the court. He’s got a good jumper and can work off the ball on the perimeter, even hit some threes. He’s a good, fundamentally sound defender for a big and is quick enough to show out or switch onto smaller players. He’s not an explosive athlete, but his feel for the game covers that. He’s not great in the post, but put him in a modern offense (like Fred Hoiberg wants to run) and he can do well.
source:  23. Trail Blazers: Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, 6’7” small forward (Arizona). UPDATE: He has been traded to the Brooklyn Nets. He could see some run for Rick Carlisle as a rookie because he can defend multiple positions, he’s one of the better perimeter defenders in this draft. Offensively, he’s got good handles and can get to the rim, but his jump shot looks uncomfortable and is not accurate. He’s got work to do on the offensive end. He seems a future role player in the NBA.

source:  24. Timberwolves (16-64, LW 30). Tyus Jones, 6’2” point guard (Duke). This was the Cavaliers pick but they are moving Jones for two second rounders in this draft. Jones will backup Ricky Rubio now. He has won pretty much everywhere he’s been, including helping Duke to a national title last season. He’s not the most athletic guy, but he plays with a very high IQ and understands how to be aggressive. He’s good off the pick-and-roll because he makes smart reads and is a creative passer. He’s got range on his jumper. He can walk in now and give backup point guard minutes. The concerns are how that lack of athleticism will play out defensively (he’s smart on that end, too, but the guys he has to guard are about to get a lot faster). There are less athletic, small point guards who have thrived in the NBA, can Jones be one of those guys?
source:  25. Grizzlies: Jarell Martin 6’9” forward (LSU). This is an odd choice because Martin seems like a guy who can play uptempo but struggles when the game grinds down, that said the Grizzlies promised him early. And Memphis grinds things down. He’s big — weighing in at 240 — and very athletic. He cleans up the glass (particularly defensively) then gets out and runs the floor well. He’s got a diverse offensive game, although his jumper needs consistency and range (but he does have a face-up game, it just needs polish). There are questions about his defense and feel for the game in the half court.
source:  26. Spurs: Nikola Milutinov, 7’0” center (Serbia). Of course the Spurs took a Euro, they do that anyway and this year they don’t want to add salary short term. The first thing you notice — he’s skinny. Seven foot and 220 pounds. To start, he’s got to add some muscle. That said he’s got potential, he’s got a fluid way of moving around the court and can play above the rim. That said, on offense he needs a lot of polish, while on defense he is not a guy who really protects the paint. It will be years before he’s over here.
source:  27. Lakers: Larry Nance Jr., 6’9” power forward (Wyoming). The senior got the attention of scouts at the Draft Combine, where he showed better than expected against his peers in this draft. He has NBA athleticism and he showed good defense in college that should translate to the NBA. His offensive game is raw, and while it has shown improvement the question is how much more he can improve. Can the Lakers develop him?
source:  28. Celtics: R.J. Hunter, 6’6” shooting guard (Georgia State). Boston has picked up a couple of scorers. Hunter can score the rock. He can shoot the three, he can get into the lane and finish, and he’s a good passer. Yes, his shooting percentage wasn’t great and his shot selection a little questionable last season, but his role was to score and defenses were geared up to stop him. Defensively he was given a green light to gamble a little. How will he adjust to the NBA where he has to play a role and be more disciplined defensively? If he adds some muscle he could be a nice scoring two guard.
source:  29. Nets: Chris McCullough, 6’9” power forward (Syracuse). He is coming off an ACL injury last January which ended his season. He’s a gifted athlete with a lot of potential at both ends. He has a nice shooting stroke, but right now his defense is ahead of his offense. And on both ends he needs a lot of polish and some added muscle to be effective. Can the Nets develop him? Are they that patient?
source:  30. Warriors: Kevon Looney, 6’9” power forward (UCLA). He’s versatile, which fits right with the Warriors plans. UCLA asked a lot of him and early in the season he delivered, but as the season wore on he faded — the lack of polish on his skills led to consistency issues. Maybe his greatest strength is on the glass. He’s got a lot of potential as both a scorer (he shot 41 percent from three) and defender, but needs to be developed. His handles, footwork, feel for the game all need to improve, and he needs to get stronger. There are concerns about his hip and if that will be a chronic issue.

source:  31. Cavaliers: Cedi Osman, 6’8” small forward (Macedonia). This pick will go to Cleveland as part of a trade for Tyus Jones. Osman has potential as a stretch four, he already has pretty much three-point range and a quick shot, plus he can put the ball on the floor. Also he is a pretty good passer and can play at the elbow that way. However, his defense is a long way from NBA ready right now. He’s going to stay in Europe. This is a draft and stash for now.
source:  32. Rockets: Montrezl Harrell, 6’8” power forward (Louisville). This is a steal early in the second round, the Rockets are going to love him because he’s an energy guy — he busts it every possession and plays with his heart on his sleeve. He slid this far down the list because he’s undersized at the four in the NBA, plus he lacks offense — he doesn’t have a steady jump shot and his post game lacks polish. Maybe Kevin McHale can use him in a Kenneth Faried kind of role, but off the bench.
source:  33. Celtics: Jordan Mickey, 6’8” power forward (LSU). He could be a steal in the second round, it’s a nice pick by the Celtics. After Washington’s Upshaw was forced to leave that program, Mickey became the leading shot blocker in the nation. His length makes him an impressive rebounder on both ends of the floor. He’s an improved man-defender. He can score around the basket and in transition, but his offense needs work.
source:  34. Lakers: Anthony Brown, 6’7” swingman (Stanford). The Lakers got a shooter. He spent five years in Palo Alto and while there developed into a quality perimeter shooter, knocking down 44.1 percent from three this past year. If the defender closes out too fast on him too fast at the arc he can put the ball on the floor, and he plays a smart game. He’s also a solid defender. He has potential as a shooting specialist or as a “3&D” guy.
source:  35. 76ers: Guillermo Hernangomez, 6’11” center (Spain). We can make the name part easy, he goes by “Willy.” He’s good at a lot of things — offensive rebounding, he’s got solid post moves — but is not great at a lot of things. What has teams interested is he’s shown a lot of improvement over the last couple years. He could develop into a solid rotation big, but he is a draft and stash guy in the short term.
source:  36. Cavaliers: Rakeem Christmas, 6’10” power forward/center (Syracuse). The Timberwolves took him but he will go to Cleveland in the Tyus Jones trade. Christmas made some real leaps forward during his senior season at Syracuse, showing a much more polished ability to score in the lane (and draw fouls) than previous years. He’s incredibly long — a 7’5” wingspan — and is known as a shot blocker (he played in the middle of that Syracuse zone), but he has the body to defend in the NBA post. Can he defend small ball fours and fives? He could give Cavs some backup minutes off the bench this season.
source:  37. 76ers: Richaun Holms, 6’10” power forward (Bowling Green). He looks the part of an NBA big man, with a filled out, strong frame, and he has shown the needed level of athleticism to play at the NBA level. He’s got potential as a modern NBA four — he has the physical tools to grab rebounds inside, plus he hit 41 percent from three last season. He has a nice face-up game, and he’s a good defender. That said, he is a project who needs much more polish on the offensive end. He’s a good second-round pick to try and bring along.
source:  38. Pistons. Darrun Hilliard, 6’6″ small forward (Villanova). He was a good college scorer, who improved from a role player to a key guy scoring 14 points a game last season as a senior. He maybe can be a role player who fits within the system, and Stan Van Gundy must like his shooting.
source:  39. Nets: Juan Vaulet, 6’6″ small forward (Argentina). While he was drafted by the Hornets, he was quickly traded to Brooklyn. He’s pretty unheralded but according to DraftExpress has a good frame and length. He’s also had a major foot injury. The bottom line is Nets GM Billy King saw something he like and rolled the dice, which is what the second round is for.
source:  40. Heat: Josh Richardson, 6’6″ shooting guard (Tennessee). He has the physical tools of an NBA wing, complete with a 6’10” wingspan and good athleticism. He played strong defense for the Volunteers. He showed a nice catch-and-shoot jumper — he hit 35 percent from three last season — but struggled when his shot was contested.
source:  41. Trail Blazers: Pat Connaughton, 6’5” shooting guard (Notre Dame). He was selected by the Nets but traded to Portland in the Hollis-Jefferson deal. The Blazers got a guy who can shoot the rock, hitting 42 percent from three last season. He showed off a 44-inch vertical at the combine, and he used that to be a good rebounder for a guard at the college level. There are questions about his ability to defend at the NBA level.
source:  42. Jazz: Olivier Hanlan, 6’4″ guard (Boston College). He is a combo guard, equally comfortable working off the ball and with it in his hands, and he was one of the better scorers in college. In a point guard role, he works well off screens in the half court, and his first inclination is to drive the lane. On defense he works hard. Can he get time on the court on a team with Trey Burke and Dante Exum already set in the rotation?
source:  43. Pacers: Joseph Young, 6’2” guard (Oregon). As the Pac 12 Player of the Year, he knows how to score the rock. He takes a lot of threes and has NBA range (36 percent from three last year as the focus of the Oregon offense). He can put the ball on the floor but will need to prove he can finish against NBA length. He also needs to prove he can defend at the NBA level to stick.

source:  44. Suns. Andrew Harrison, 6’6” point guard (Kentucky). UPDATE: He was traded to Memphis, so Grizzlies fans this is for you. He is a big, strong point guard who knows how to use that size to bull his way to the rim (or use his change of pace) and score or draw a foul. That size also can make him a quality defender against either guard position. But does he have the handles and ability to finish against NBA athletes (he wasn’t efficient in college)? His decision-making (and mediocre handles) has some scouts doubting his ability to run an NBA offense.
source:  45. Celtics: Marcus Thornton, 6’3″ point guard (William & Mary). He used his quickness to score 20 points a game in college. He was asked to do everything at William & Mary, he’ll have to adjust to a smaller role now but that should help his efficiency. He’s going to score in transition and be a catch-and-shoot guy at the next level, but he did well on contested shots, which is a good sign.
source:  46. Bucks: Norman Powell, 6’4” shooting guard (UCLA). He can be a second-round pick who contributes for Jason Kidd. His best assets are on the defensive side, where, thanks to his great athleticism, he can guard the one and the two, using quickness and strength to stick with his man. On offense, he uses that strength to get into the paint, where he finishes pretty well. However, his jumper is inconsistent. He can become a decent rotation player.
source:  47. 76ers: Arturas Gudaitis, 6’10” center (Lithuania). Another draft and stash guy for the Sixers. This is not a soft Euro hanging out by the arc, he is 250 pounds and likes to muscle around inside and defend in the post. He moves pretty well, so he can show out on the perimeter, or be good on the roll after setting a pick. He is strong on the offensive glass. That said he has no shooting range, his feel for the game is in question, and he may struggle against bigger, stronger NBA players.
source:  48. Thunder: Dakari Johnson, 7’0” center (Kentucky). He’s got the size and athletic ability to play at the NBA level — Calipari brought him into Kentucky for a reason — but he’s got a lot of work to do in terms of fundamentals like footwork. Think of it this way: How much did you see him through the second half of Kentucky’s run? Not much. He’s got to get more polish and more moves offensively. Defensively, he’s got to learn how to use his body and wingspan better. He is just 19, he can develop and he has the tools, but it’s a project.
source:  49. Wizards: Aaron White, 6’9″ power forward (Iowa). His offensive game took a step forward in his senior season and he’s an efficient scorer. He’s got good bounce and he works hard off the ball. Pretty good energy guy. There are questions about his ability to do those things well enough at an NBA level, but it’s a solid second-round gamble.
source:  50. Hawks: Marcus Eriksson, 6’7″ shooting guard (Sweden). While he has a slightly low release, if you let him set his feet he has incredible shooting range. That sentence would sum up the notes we had on him from the 2014 Adidas EuroCamp. He’s a draft and stash, not sure he ever makes it stateside.
source:  51. Magic: Tyler Harvey, 6’4” shooting guard (Eastern Washington). He was the nation’s leading scorer at 22.9 points per game. He faced defenses geared up to shut him down, yet he showed ridiculous shooting range hitting 40.9 percent from three. He can score off the bounce or coming off screens. He’s got a quick release. But he’s not in the Big Sky anymore, can he keep doing it against the athletes and length of the NBA? Also, there are questions about his ability to defend at the next level.
source:  52. Mavericks: Satnam Singh, 7’2″ center (India). He’s big, long, he’s pretty mobile for somebody that big, and he has shown improvement working at the IMG Academy in Florida. He’s still raw with a long way to go, but he’s young and this is a good late second-round gamble.
source:  53. Cavaliers: Sir’Dominic Pointer, 6’5″ small forward (St. John’s). He’s got the physical tools you like to see in an NBA player, but he was more defender than scorer at St. John’s. He can be a little bit passive offensively, but he improved his last year of college and has shown a good passing game. He needs a vastly improved jumper if he is going to stick, but he can defend so he has a chance.
source:  54. Jazz: Daniel Diez, 6’8” small forward (Spain). He is strong on the catch-and-shoot has a great feel for the game, but there are concerns that his athleticism is not up to the NBA average. He’s not a guy with the handles or ability to create his own shot at the NBA level, he seems more strictly a shooter. He can be stashed in the Spanish league to see if he develops.
source:  55. Spurs: Cady Lalanne, 6’10 power forward (UMass). The Hatian native didn’t blow scouts away with his play his senior year of college — but he showed there is still value at the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament where he stood out. So did his 7’5″ wingspan. The hope is he can become a defensive and rebounding specialist.
source:  56. Pelicans: Branden Dawson, 6’7″ power forward (Michigan State). He is a fantastic athlete, who set a school record in blocks and hit the boards hard. He is going to be a defensive and energy specialist, if he sticks at the NBA level. His offense is improved but needs work.
source:  57. Nuggets: Nikola Radicevic, 6’5″ point guard (Serbia). He was a teammate of Knicks’ No. 4 pick Porzingis, but Radicevic is a draft and stash guy. He has potential as a playmaking point guard, he’s got good size and athleticism, but he’s raw and has a lot of work to do to polish his game.
source:  58. 76ers: J.P. Tokoto, 6’6” shooting guard (North Carolina). Yes, he could have used another year in college to refine his skills, but he will develop faster here if the Sixers handle him right. He is as athletic as anyone in this draft, and he showed improvement using that in pick-and-roll situations (he’s a good passer). His shot improved as well (37.5 percent from three last season, but a small sample size). He’s fantastic in transition, but he’s raw. Very raw.
source:  59. Hawks: Dimitrios Agravanis, 6’10” power forward (Greece). He plays for Olympiacos and if you want to dream that his shooting skills can develop into him being an NBA stretch four some day, you go right ahead. I’m not going to kill that dream. But he’s a draft and stash and I’d be surprised if he ever shows up in the NBA.
source:  60. 76ers: Luka Mitrovic, 6’8″ power forward (Serbia). Draft and stash, with the emphasis on the stash.

PBT’s NBA Mock Draft 1.0: Things get interesting starting with New York at four.

2015 NBA Draft Lottery

The order is up for discussion, but we have a pretty good idea who the top three picks in the NBA Draft will be.

Where things get interesting is with Phil Jackson’s Knicks at No. 4. Will they trade the pick? If they keep it — and they should keep it unless they get a “you can’t say no” offer — who should they take?

At PBT, we turned to our draft expert Ed Isaacson of Rotoworld and NBADraftBlog — and he differed from the pack on what the Knicks should do if they keep the pick. You can find this draft at Rotoworld.com as well.

1. Minnesota Timberwolves: Jahlil Okafor, C, Duke – The Timberwolves can’t go wrong adding either Okafor or Karl-Anthony Towns to a lineup with Rookie of the Year Andrew Wiggins, but I think adding Okafor’s scoring ability in the low post right away will open up the floor even more for Wiggins, Rubio and team. Concerns about Okafor’s defensive liabilities are overblown, and he should learn and adjust over some time.

2. Los Angeles Lakers: Karl-Anthony Towns, C, Kentucky – The Lakers luck out and don’t have to make the choice between the top two players in the draft, happy to take whoever doesn’t go to Minnesota. Towns will give the Lakers a strong defensive presence in the middle, and the pairing with Julius Randle in the frontcourt will give the team some offensive weapons and rebounding on a team that desperately needs them.

3. Philadelphia 76ers: D’Angelo Russell, PG/SG, Ohio State – The picks of Nerlens Noel and Joel Embiid the past two seasons have given the Sixers two big-time prospects in the frontcourt, but adding someone to get them the ball should be a priority. Russell can play either backcourt spot, able to knock down jumpers or create for others in the pick-and-roll. He’s not a very good defender, but having Noel and Embiid behind him should help with any players who get by him.

4. New York Knicks: Justise Winslow, SF, Duke – There are few areas where the Knicks don’t need a lot of help, and while point guard may be the biggest, I don’t think the options are great for them here. Trading the pick could be a good choice, but if not, Winslow will give the team an athletic young wing who can defend, as well as having the potential to be a versatile scorer.

5. Orlando Magic: Willie Cauley-Stein, C, Kentucky – The Magic have done a good job adding young, athletic players the past few years in Victor Oladipo, Aaron Gordon and Elfrid Payton. Cauley-Stein is the type of big man who should allow this young core to play at a quick pace, and it will play to his only real strength on offense. Plus, it gives the Magic a high-level defender and shot-blocker in the middle, something Nikola Vucevic didn’t give them last season.

6. Sacramento Kings: Emmanuel Mudiay, PG, Guangdong (China) – The Kings have looked for shooting in the lottery the last two years, and while Ben McLemore showed improvement last year, Nik Stauskas struggled. With the focus of the team on DeMarcus Cousins, the Kings should look to shore up the point guard position. Darren Collison is coming back from core muscle surgery, but Mudiay, a physical guard who likes to attack the basket, will give the Kings some long-term hopes for the position.

7. Denver Nuggets: Mario Hezonja, SG/SF, FC Barcelona (Spain) – A lot went wrong for the Nuggets last season, but they still need to add talent at just about every position. Hezonja is an athletic wing who can shoot, and is a very good ballhandler for his size. He’s probably a few years away from making any kind of real impact, but Denver can afford to get him some floor time now off the bench as he adjusts to the NBA.

8. Detroit Pistons: Kristaps Porzingis, PF, Balancesto Sevilla (Spain) – Many expect Greg Monroe to move on as a free agent, and Porzingis could be a nice complement in the frontcourt next to Andre Drummond. The 7’1” Latvian is a skilled offensive player for 19 years old, including being able to step out and knock down long-range jumpers. He’ll struggle for a while on the defensive side, but paired with Drummond, I don’t think it will hurt Detroit much, and his size on the perimeter can make it tough for opposing stretch 4’s.

9. Charlotte Hornets: Stanley Johnson, SG/SF, Arizona – Johnson is a strong, athletic wing, with the ability to knock down perimeter shots, score in transition and defend. He can be moved between the 2 and the 3, with the ability to defend either position, and though his shooting can be inconsistent, he made a lot of improvement last season. Though he’ll just be 19 at the start of next season, Johnson should be able to make immediate contributions for the Hornets.

10. Miami Heat: Devin Booker, SG, Kentucky – With Dwyane Wade’s career likely coming to an end soon, Booker will give the Heat some depth at the shooting guard position. He’s one of the top long-range shooters in the draft, as well as a strong perimeter defender. He’s certainly not a Wade-type guard, but he’ll give the Heat some needed scoring and defense, at least in the short-term.

11. Indiana Pacers: Myles Turner, C, Texas – Roy Hibbert has a player option on his contract for next season, and assuming he returns, last year was a rough one for him. Add to that a lack of depth at the position to begin with, and Turner makes a lot of sense for the Pacers at 11. Turner, who measured just shy of 7-feet tall at the NBA Combine, is very skilled for his age, especially with his shooting and shot-blocking ability. In a lot of ways, he seems to still be learning about what kind of player he wants to be, so a year learning and adjusting behind Hibbert would be great for him.

12. Utah Jazz: Kelly Oubre, Jr., SF, Kansas – Utah has a very good young core of players led by Gordon Hayward, Derrick Favors and Rudy Gobert. Though Dante Exum and Trey Burke have both struggled in the early parts of their careers, it’s too early for Utah to give up on them and draft another point guard. Oubre will add an athletic wing who has shown some ability to knock down jumpers and has the length to become a good defender on the perimeter. He’s still more athlete than player, so backing up Hayward for a couple of years will be good for him.

13. Phoenix Suns: Frank Kaminsky, C/PF, Wisconsin – Phoenix has a lot of pieces in place to get back to the playoffs, so adding a versatile big man like Kaminsky should give the team a good player to add to a frontcourt of the Morris twins and Alex Len. Though the tallest player at the NBA combine, Kaminsky’s lack of strength makes him more suited to be a stretch 4, though he could be used to spell Len when needed. He isn’t very quick, but he’s skilled, and he learned to be a strong team defender under Bo Ryan at Wisconsin.

14. Oklahoma City Thunder: Cameron Payne, PG, Murray State – With the trade of Reggie Jackson last season, the Thunder could be looking for a good back-up to Russell Westbrook. Payne is a good perimeter shooter, and a strong passer and decision-maker in the pick-and-roll. He is the kind of point guard who could flourish under new coach Billy Donovan, and learn a lot playing with Westbrook and Kevin Durant.

15. Atlanta Hawks: Bobby Portis, PF, Arkansas – Portis is a strong, skilled forward with the ability to score inside and out. He’s a very good perimeter defender for his size, as well as a strong rebounder on both ends of the floor, and playing under Mike Anderson at Arkansas has taught him to play hard on every possession. Paul Millsap is a free agent after this season, and while Portis may not be ready to step in immediately for a team that won 60 games, he could play valuable minutes at both the power forward and center positions.

16. Boston Celtics: Trey Lyles, PF, Boston – Boston made a great pick last year, getting Marcus Smart to pair in the backcourt with Avery Bradley, and now Isaiah Thomas, who they added at the trade deadline. They could look to add a player like Sam Dekker to add depth on the wings, but I think Lyles would also be a great addition to their frontcourt, giving some much-needed athleticism at the power forward position. Lyles mostly played out of position last season at Kentucky, but he is a versatile scorer at the 4, and though he does need to work on extending the range on his jumper the mechanics are there. He handles the ball well for 6’10” and he can be a threat attacking the basket off the dribble.

17. Milwaukee Buck: Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, SF, Arizona – Khris Middleton will be a free agent this summer, so the Bucks may be looking to add a player at the small forward position. Hollis-Jefferson will give them another long defender on the perimeter with Michael Carter-Williams and Giannis Antetokounmpo, and though offensively challenged right now, he can create his own opportunities by hitting the offensive glass. If the Bucks are looking for more of an offensive threat at the position, Sam Dekker would probably be a popular choice in Milwaukee, but I think Hollis-Jefferson may help them a bit more.

18. Houston Rockets: Jerian Grant, PG, Notre Dame – The Rockets can use some depth in the backcourt, especially at the point guard position. They should have their choice of a couple of players here, but Grant could give them some options at the position that they don’t really have now. He has good size at the point, can create off the dribble and he’s a better long-range shooter than his percentage last season. His length can be disruptive on the perimeter, and with Patrick Beverley a free agent this summer and coming off a wrist injury, Grant may be able to step in quickly and claim the spot.

19. Washington Wizards: Montrezl Harrell, PF, Louisville – The Wizards have a great young backcourt in John Wall and Bradley Beal, and Otto Porter’s play in the postseason was hopefully a sign of things to come for him. The frontcourt could use some athleticism, especially at the power forward position, and Harrell would be a nice addition. I’ve never been big on using the word “motor” when describing how a player plays on the floor, but it seems right for Harrell. He is slightly undersized for the position, but he is strong and athletic, can run the floor well, and rebounds and defends as well as a player 3 or 4 inches taller than him. He would certainly give Wall another good option when wanting to pick up the pace on the floor.

20. Toronto Raptors: Kevon Looney, PF, UCLA – I’m really not sure what to make of this Toronto team after seeing them down the stretch this season, so they could probably go in a lot of directions here. Amir Johnson and Tyler Hansbrough will be free agents this summer, so they may look to add depth to the power forward spot. Looney is certainly not ready to contribute right away for the Raptors, or any team really, but he has the makings of a big forward who can stretch the floor, has the length to defend the position and has a knack for rebounding. The Raptors already need to wait at least a few years before last year’s pick, Bruno Caboclo, shows if he even belongs in the NBA, so there’s little harm in letting Looney develop over the next few years as well.

21. Dallas Mavericks: Tyus Jones, PG, Duke – The Rajon Rondo trade backfired on the Mavericks when the postseason hit, and relying on JJ Barea doesn’t seem to be a solid long-term strategy, so taking Jones, a young point guard with a knack for coming up big when it matters, could be a good fit here. Jones has very good patience for his age, sees the floor well, and knows how to hit teammates in the right spot for easy basket. He’s really not a great athlete, and may be a liability on defense, at least early in his career, but he could still add a lot of value long-term as a backup.

22. Chicago Bulls: Sam Dekker, SF, Wisconsin – With the uncertainty around the head coaching position for the Bulls still an issue, it is tough to determine what direction they want to go with this pick, but Dekker is easily the best player left at this point, and he could certainly help them on both ends of the floor. At 6’9”, Dekker has very good size for the small forward position, and though he played in a very structured offense at Wisconsin, he has the skill and athleticism to blossom into a versatile offensive threat on the wing. The Bulls might want to add more perimeter shooting here, or a big man to eventually replace Pau Gasol and Joakim Noah; you really can’t go wrong adding a talent like Dekker.

23. Portland Trail Blazers: Christian Wood, PF, UNLV – The status of LaMarcus Aldridge’s free agency this summer will be Portland’s biggest issue, and while Wood is certainly not a replacement for Aldridge, he is a young, athletic forward who has barely scraped the surface of what he could become as a player. Wood should eventually develop to be a good inside/outside threat, and his length and athletic ability could help him develop into a plus-defender.

24. Cleveland Cavaliers: RJ Hunter, SG, Georgia State – The trade for JR Smith and Iman Shumpert has worked for Cleveland so far, but Hunter could give them a better long-term option at the shooting guard position. He already has NBA range on his jumper, and with the good looks he would get on the floor with LeBron James and Kyrie Irving, he could give them a consistent threat from the perimeter. Also, Hunter is a smart player, sees the floor well, and can be a good passer, so he could thrive without having to be a top scoring option.

25. Memphis Grizzlies: Justin Anderson, SG, Virginia – Though the Grizzlies just took Jordan Adams in the first round last year, Anderson gives them a better athlete and shooter at the shooting guard position, and his ability to defend on the perimeter should be a great fit in Memphis. Marc Gasol is a free agent this summer, though all signs seem to point to him staying in Memphis, the Grizzlies may still want to look for a big man here, but Anderson is a good enough to break into the backcourt rotation by the end of next season.

26. San Antonio Spurs: Jarell Martin, PF, LSU – At some point, maybe even next season, Tim Duncan won’t be playing power forward for the Spurs anymore, and while there isn’t any player that can replace him, the team can look to start adding production there. Martin has good size and athletic ability, is an above-average defender and rebounder and has shown some versatility on offense. The Spurs may look to free agency if Duncan decides to retire, but even so, Martin will give them a young, productive forward off the bench.

27. Los Angeles Lakers: JP Tokoto, SG, North Carolina – With the Lakers having filled a need in the frontcourt with Towns at number 2, adding some help in the backcourt could be where they go here. Jordan Clarkson emerged at the point guard spot last season, and while he may not be a long-term solution, he will still be productive. Tokoto will give them an athletic defender to pair with him, and depending on how Kobe Bryant is next season, he can give some help off the bench. Tokoto isn’t a very good shooter, but he has good vision and is a strong passer, that I think he could even back up the point guard position if needed.

28. Boston Celtics: Robert Upshaw, C, Washington – Upshaw is one of the toughest players to fit in during an exercise like this, mainly because it’s tough to gauge how teams will view the issues which led to his dismissal at Fresno State and Washington. At 28, he is definitely worth the risk, especially for a team that can use a rim protector like Upshaw. His 7’5” wingspan was tops at the NBA combine, and he was the NCAA’s top shot-blocker before his dismissal. I think the Celtics have the personnel to keep him focused on the court, and Brad Stevens may be the type of coach to get the best out of him.

29. Brooklyn Nets: Rashad Vaughn, SG, UNLV – Brooklyn is another team that can use help at almost every position, and while I think they could really use some help at point guard, they are tied up with Deron Williams and Jarrett Jack for the next few seasons. They can certainly use some more shooting, and Vaughn could develop in a couple of years into a consistent NBA three-point threat. Another option may be to draft and stash young Brazilian point guard George de Paula, but I think getting either of these players at 29 would be pretty good for the Nets.

30. Golden State Warriors: Chris McCullough, PF, Syracuse – The biggest priority for Golden State this summer will be re-signing Draymond Green, and after that, there aren’t really any major holes in the NBA’s best team. McCullough’s freshman season at Syracuse was cut short due an ACL injury, and he is still very raw as a player, but he has length and athletic ability. Golden State has done a great job using their Santa Cruz D-League affiliate to develop players, and McCullough would be perfect for them to work with over the next year or two.

Trey Burke suffered one strange injury (video)

Portland Trail Blazers v Utah Jazz

Trey Burke was just dribbling the ball up court when he suddenly went down like he’d been shot.

After the game, Burke said it felt like a pinched nerve and that whole area went numb. The Jazz point guard also said he felt better.