Tag: trade rumors

Los Angeles Lakers Introduce Dwight Howard

The Inbounds: The vanishing trade offer for Dwight Howard act


Welcome to The Inbounds, touching on a big idea of the day. It could be news, it could be history, it could be a tangent, it could be love. OK, it’s probably not love. Enjoy.

If one were to really want to, you could find out what exactly the Magic were offered for Dwight Howard for themselves.

If you’re smart, crafty, lucky, and persistent, you can drag out enough information from someone surround the situation to get you an answer. And that answer will satisfy the requirement of knowing “what the Magic could have had for Howard.”

It doesn’t mean it’s the truth.

There are reporters who know. I’m not one of them. But there are some. A few have the entire story, I’m sure, but can’t report on the details due to circumstances. So instead we get half and quarter-truths. But the one thing that seems more and more apparent is that if there were better offers still on the table for the Magic when they pulled the trigger, they were not cognizant those offers were legitimate. And in that situation, that’s a failure of the trade partners to convey their offers.

On Wednesday, SI.com reported that sources outside the Rockets had a drastically different perception of what was available for Howard from Houston than what has been reported in regards to their offer. The “pick two” of Jeremy Lamb-Terrence Jones-Royce White component along with the three draft picks was off the table.

That shfit in perception damages a pretty popular argument that was made after the trade Friday. “They could have had a better offer and they just turned it down for this!”

As if Rob Hennigan is purposefully going to reject a better offer. These types of things aren’t rocket science. It’s establishing what the best package is with players, picks, and contracts. If Brook Lopez were on his rookie deal, it would have bee done months ago, even if the Nets had tampered with Orlando.

But that’s the perception. It was an impossible trade, and when teams started to bail and prepare for the season, something had to be done to get out from under the knife of dealing with Howard once the season started. That situation was untenable. Not for the front office, they knew they were doomed. But it’s not fair to a roster of players to have them train for camp not knowing if they were going to be on the team, going to be training for the playoffs, or just training.

The truth is, in all this he-said-he-said, both sides walked away from the deal with the perception they couldn’t get what they wanted. Both sides were right, at one point or another. But these talks shift moment to moment, and when the opportunity for a legimate deal comes through that accomplishes the Magic’s goals, it has to be taken. And if you have a better offer? It is your job to put away the efforts to establish leverage and to make it clear that no deal should be consummated without first checking with you. The stakes are too high. You should make it clear you want a chance to respond. But the posturing is always more important than the tactics.

Everyone’s always talking to everyone. There are very few secrets, but ther’s also very little real news. If your job was to improve the trade wth talk, wouldn’t you do a fair amount of talking?

The Houston and Brooklyn deals are the most often cited as alternatives to what the Magic walked away with. But the offers cited are never given dates, or if they are, they’re not reported as the “last available offer.” Kris Humphries and Brook Lopez had to agree to sign-and-trades had the offer been accepted by the Magic, who were tired of being jerked around by the Nets and Howard.

The Magic were never going to win in this trade. It was an impossibility. But they moved some salary, got some players they can build around or trade again. They picked up a wider selection of picks, which is crucial to judging this. Houston offered the Raptors and their own pick, yes. But with the Raptors possibly leaping into the playoffs with the possible fall of the Hawks and Magic, and the Rockets likely getting into the playoffs with Howard, the upgrade there is limited. Moreso, the picks would all be in one season, vs. the package Orlando did take, which spreads them out, giving them time to establish a plan and then take advantage of the extra picks.

Mostly, though, this is more about agendas than anything, though. There are agendas at work to make it seem like the Magic didn’t take the best available option. And as has been consistent throughout the process, the Magic have been largely quiet outside of a conversation between Hennigan and SI.com. They know they can’t win anything by revealing what offers they got and setting the record straight. So instead, they’ll simply deal with the jokes and accusations.

But somewhere in all this, the lines of communication broke down, somewhere in this, teams pushed back to try and get the best deal too much. And the result was the Magic simply relenting and getting it over with. So, yes, you can go find out what happened. But ask someone else, you’ll get a different answer. There is no one answer to “What could the Magic have had instead for Dwight Howard.” There is only what is.

Trade offers are liquid, and if nothing is there to catch them, they slip into the cracks and disappear forever, even as their creators cry that they are right there to deal the water they can’t see.

Report: Nets-Magic Howard deal blew up because of Orlando animosity

Dwight Howard

Business is business. But business is conducted by humans, and humans have emotions, like pride, anger, and resentment. And it turns out that what may have sunk a potential Nets-Magic deal wasn’t the deal itself, but how Orlando felt about the Nets. From the New York Daily News:

A league source told the Daily News that a stumbling block in negotiations was lingering animosity stemming from the Magic’s belief the Nets illegally contacted Howard in December without Orlando’s permission. The Nets denied they had met with Howard, and charges were never filed with the league.

via Brooklyn Nets’ Deron Williams lost interest in Dwight Howard sweepstakes well before Thursday’s trade to the Lakers – NY Daily News.

In the same article, Deron Williams says that the Magic “just didn’t want to deal him to (the Nets).”

The reaction from most people is going to be outrage, or disgust, that personal feelings should never get in the way of a deal this important.

My response? There are bigger things at play here.

For starters, the Nets’ deal wasn’t some awe-inspiring package of young players and picks. The picks all came from one team, which was going to be 25-plus with a core of Deron Williams and Dwight Howard. Brook Lopez is a phenomenal talent, but because of his free agency status, was going to end up giving them a sizable contract that was going to be hard to move if Lopez has injury issues or regresses further. Even if Kris Humphries would have been on a $9 million one-year deal as Yahoo Sports reported, 1. Humphries would have to agree to take substantially less than market value (he signed for two-years, $12-million) and 2. you’re still looking at over $20 million going on the books in 2013 for an absolutely wretched team. Even with Marshon Brooks and the cap-clearing, that’s not a good deal. you can argue it was better than what they got, that comes down to how you feel about Lopez, and there are arguments to be made on both sides.

But there’s a bigger point here.

In business, the companies that thrive long-term have a commitment to doing it the right way. You can skirt those tactics for a while, but eventually, the rot gets through your organization and your hubris takes its toll. And there’s something to be said for maintaining your pride. If the Magic legitimately felt that the Nets had tampered with their player, their best player, that’s a huge violation of NBA rules and of NBA managerial conduct. It’s one thing to tamper with your player, it’s another to then continually collude with that player’s camp to ruin all other leverage in regards to other deals and to constantly pressure the team into making the trade. And there’s a lot of evidence that that might have gone on. You can’t blame Howard’s people. It’s their job to fulfill their clients wishes. That’s what their responsibility is, not to the team. But to Howard, and to the Nets, as members of the NBA, there’s a way to conduct business and a way not to. So if Orlando decided it didn’t want to have someone steal their lunch money, then trade their backpack to get a third of that money back, I don’t see how you can blame them.

It’s not about being petty. It’s about conducting yourself in a way that maintains your self-respect. Maybe the Nets did nothing wrong, they certainly have always claimed so. But there were reports about meetings between Prokhorov and Howard prior to Orlando granting teams permission to speak with him. Even if they did nothing wrong, the Magic acted out of self-preservation.

Sometimes you just can’t let people walk all over you, even if it is, “the best thing for you.”

Report: Dwight Howard could be traded by early August. (This is us not holding our breath.)

Dwight Howard

Sam Amick of SI.com reports that there are indications the Magic could trade Dwight Howard sometime soon, maybe. I can hear your waiting with baited breath from here. From Amick:

…the Magic, I’m told, are hopeful that they can pull the trigger on a deal by early August (although I certainly couldn’t tell you which one it might be). That being said, new GM Rob Hennigan – who I had the pleasure of meeting for the first time in Vegas – is proving to be very prudent in this process, meaning those hopes won’t be realized if the deal simply isn’t up to his standard’s (sic).

via Sam Amick’s post on Basketball | Latest updates on Sulia.

I know, I know. What a non-update, right?

Here’s the deal. Until Howard gets moved, we’re in this holding pattern. And it’s relevant from the perspective that it’s crucial to know if the Magic consider opening night their deadline, start of training camp, or early August to give themselves time to cleanse the palate of this gross affair. So we could be looking at the last two weeks of this drawn out cluster flocking of bad news birds that has marred this ugly episode.

Let’s all join hands and pray to whatever we pray to that this is, in fact, the end.

Report: Hornets in talks for sign-and-trade for Ryan Anderson

Ryan Anderson

This is unexpected.

Yahoo Sports reports that restricted free agent Ryan Anderson will not re-sign with the Magic and will be moved in a sign-and-trade. Shortly thereafter, the Orlando Sentinel reported that the Hornets are in talks with the Magic for a sign-and-trade of the stretch four.

The news comes as a shocker with huge implications. It was assumed that Anderson would be re-signed as the face of the future of the Magic, after a year in which he was very much a candidate for Most Improved Player. He shot the lights out in an expanded role and continued his rebounding ways. The Hornets could look to pair him with No. 1 overall draft pick Anthony Davis in a small-ball lineup that would spread the floor for Davis to work in the pick and roll and attack the basket.

The Hornets’ biggest problem last year was making shots and Anderson can score, defend, and rebound. He averaged 18 points and 9 rebounds per 36 last season for the Magic, shooting 39 percent from the arc. He’s an all-around player who can’t create on his own but can punish teams with his range and versatility and attacks the glass all the same.

For the Magic, the first words that come to mind are “Dwight Howard.” Any move like this that indicates a rebuilding effort and a reshaping of the roster would lean towards the Magic prepping for a trade. Ken Berger at CBSSports.com reports the Nets are trying to package three first-rounders to send to Orlando. That would require a third team wanting to give up a first-rounder to overpay Brook Lopez, but isn’t inconceivable.

UPDATE 4:17 p.m.: Surprisingly, word out of Orlando is that this is not a precursor to a Howard trade. The Anderson deal is a 4-year, $36 million sign-and-trade according to Yahoo Sports. CBSSports.com reports Gustavo Ayon is a centerpiece being sent to Orlando, which shows you how much of a cash dump this is, despite Ayon’s upside.

Report: Nets in talks with Hawk for Joe Johnson trade

Joe Johnson

Talk about big ticket item.

Yahoo Sports reports that the New Jersey Nets are in talks with the Atlanta Hawks about a potential trade for Joe Johnson.

In a potential move that would cripple their aspirations of eventually acquiring Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard, the Brooklyn Nets are engaged in talks with the Atlanta Hawks on a deal for All-Star swingman Joe Johnson, league sources told Yahoo! Sports.

The Nets’ plan would be to pair Johnson and point guard Deron Williams to create an All-Star backcourt. No deal is close, and the Hawks and Nets were both discussing deals on several fronts, sources said. Hawks officials have told teams they have multiple trade possibilities.

via Brooklyn Nets discussing trade for Atlanta Hawks guard Joe Johnson – Yahoo! Sports.

After years of stagnation, the Hawks are in complete rebuild mode under new GM Danny Ferry. Yet any serious rebuilding efforts are blocked by Johnson, whose max contract still has four years remaining and which ends up in the $20-million-plus range in the final year of the deal, crippling under the new CBA. Billy King and the Deron-Williams-desperate Nets could be their Get-Out-Of-Luxury-Tax-Free card.

The Nets want a star, and the idea here is to pair Williams with Johnson, but not with Dwight Howard. Due to salary cap structures and the new CBA, the Nets would not be able to bring in Dwight Howard if they acquire Johnson. There is some speculation that Johnson could be seen as a “Plan B” if Deron Williams isn’t re-signed as well.

Johnson’s efficiency is slipping as his age climb just as his contract really gets going year-by-year. But he’s an exceptional defender, something that’s often overlooked, and still can have monster scoring nights. But for the Nets, this seems a bit desperate. Trading for Johnson would be proof that no contract is untradeable. He’s an All-Star but only in the loosest sense of the word.

There are big rumblings across the NBA landscape as free agency season begins.