Tag: Tornike Shengelia

Ersan Ilyasova, Ben Gordon

Bobcats waive Ben Gordon after deadline for him to join playoff roster


A year ago, the Charlotte Bobcats tried to trade Ben Gordon – and apparently couldn’t.

A week ago, they tried to buy out Gordon – and apparently couldn’t.

But they could waive him.

Bobcats news release:

Charlotte Bobcats President of Basketball Operations Rod Higgins announced today that the team has requested waivers on guard Ben Gordon. The Bobcats roster now stands at 14 players.

“With the recent acquisition of additional backcourt depth to our roster, we believe this is in the best interests of both parties,” Higgins said. “We want to thank Ben for his contributions over the past two seasons and wish him the best as he moves on in his career.”

By not waiving Gordon before midnight, the Bobcats ensured he’s not eligible for a playoff roster. This was either a negotiation gone nowhere or a “screw you” move by a team fed up with a player who’d been a bit petulant.

Assuming Gordon didn’t agree to a buyout – why would he after midnight? – he’ll get the remaining $ 3,571,765 he’s owed. So, if the Bobcats were trying to punish him, they’ll only go so far.

But this makes it unlikely any team signs Gordon for the rest of the season.

Teams not interested in the playoffs probably don’t want an over-the-hill veteran taking minutes from young players. Teams in the playoff hunt probably don’t want to waste time integrating a player who can’t play in the postseason.

But maybe there’s a middle-ground team who could use Gordon: the New York Knicks.

The Knicks’ playoff chances range from slim to none, but they’ve already traded their first- and second-round picks. They have no incentive to tank.

New York can make best use of its remaining games by making Carmelo Anthony happy before he enters free agency. Even if the Knicks miss the playoffs, a few extra wins could only help.

There’s no guarantee Gordon – who’s posted negative win shares this season and last, one of only nine players to do so* – would actually help New York. A shooter making just 37 percent of his 2-pointers and 28 percent of his 3-points tends to carry little value.

Which is why the playoff-bound Bobcats would rather pay Gordon to go away than keep him.

*The others: Al Harrington, Tornike Shengelia, Marquis Teague, Drew Gooden, Quincy Miller, Diante Garrett, Tyshawn Taylor and Dexter Pittman.

Report: Bulls discussed Taj Gibson trade with Lakers, Wizards and Bobcats

Los Angeles Lakers v Chicago Bulls

The Chicago Bulls, at least on some level, aren’t totally concerned with how they fare this season.

Derrick Rose is already out for the year, and no matter how well everything else comes together, the superstar’s injury limits the Bulls’ upside in 2014.

They already traded Luol Deng for zero assets that will help them this year. That they’ve gone 9-4 since the deal is a product of a soft schedule and a small sample – not a reason to reverse course from their greater vision.

If that plan includes pairing Rose with Carmelo Anthony (or another high-priced free agent) next season, Chicago will likely need to clear cap room.

Trading Marquise Teague for the expiring contract of Tornike Shengelia was a small start, but the the Bulls still have $64,124,513 committed to seven players (Rose, Carlos Boozer, Joakim Noah, Taj Gibson, Mike Dunleavy Jimmy, Butler and Tony Snell plus the buyout of Richard Hamilton).

Amnestying Boozer, who has a $16.8 million price tag in 2014-15, brings that commitment down to $46,203,593. But that still doesn’t leave enough room for Melo.

With a projected salary cap of $62.1 million, the Bulls would still be $6,561,995 short of being able to offer Melo his maximum starting salary ($22,458,402) – and that’s before factoring Chicago’s first-round pick(s)* and roster charges for having fewer than 12 players remove cap room.

*The Bobcats owe Chicago a first-round pick that is top-10 protected this year.

But if the Bulls removed Gibson’s $8 million salary from the equation, suddenly, they’re right in that Melo range.

That would mean the loss of a solid player, but if the Bulls are willing to take a step back this season to take a step forward in the future – a tradeoff the Deng trade says they find appealing – Gibson’s absence wouldn’t be detrimental.

Joe Cowley of the Chicago Sun-Times:

According to a source, the Lakers, Wizards and Bobcats have each inquired about Gibson, but they were preliminary talks in which the Bulls did not like the return.

First of all, opposing teams calling Chicago about Gibson, who has three years remaining on his contract after this one, hardly means he’s on the block. If I can see why it makes sense for the Bulls to entertain Gibson trades, so can they. NBA front offices discuss trading players all the time. A majority of those discussions are one-sided and lead nowhere.

But let’s look at these three teams.

I doubt the Lakers like Gibson enough to surrender expiring contracts to get him, essentially destroying their own tightly manicured cap room to sign a star free agent. A Lakers deal would almost have to include Steve Nash, who’s under contract for next season and would cut into Chicago’s flexibility. But at a certain point, Nash plus pick(s) for Gibson would appeal to Chicago. It just matters which pick(s).

The Wizards could offer Trevor Ariza’s expiring contract and a sweetener, but they can’t include a first-round because they still owe the Suns theirs from the Marcin Gortat trade – making it much more difficult to find that sweetener. Perhaps, the Bulls really like Martell Webster, and his salary in future seasons is slightly lower than Gibson’s, but it’s unlikely Chicago would accept that drop in production for only a moderate annual savings.

The Bobcats are much more intriguing. With the expiring of Ramon Sessions, who would boost Chicago’s point guard play this season – even if the Bulls aren’t totally focused on winning this season, I doubt they’d mind it – plus several moderately priced young players (Gerald Henderson, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Cody Zeller and Bismack Biyombo), Charlotte could put together an appealing and fair offer. Gibson would go a long way in shoring up the Bobcats’ weakest position, power forward.

But, in all likelihood, these teams are trying to buy low on Gibson. The Bulls can always try to use him in a sign-and-trade down the road – I bet, say, the Knicks could use him – so Chicago is not forced to deal him now.

Unless other teams approach negotiations with that in mind, I suspect all Gibson trade talk will remain “preliminary.”

Nets to try and get Disabled Player Exception for Lopez, add player to roster

Denver Nuggets v Brooklyn Nets

The Nets are capped out and have 15 guys on the roster — they cannot add another body under the NBA rules. However with Brook Lopez out for the season, they want to. Need to, really, when you consider the injury history of players on the roster.

So the Nets are going to file the paperwork for a Disabled Player Exception according to GM Billy King, as reported by Andy Vasquez of the Bergin Record.

What does that mean? Teams who are over the cap can apply for this exception to add a player when they lose one for the season (something a league doctor has to clear but will in the case of Lopez).

Who can they get? Straight from Larry Coon’s NBA CBA FAQ:

• The team may sign a free agent for one season only, for 50% of the disabled player’s salary or the amount of the Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception, whichever is less.

• The team may trade for a player in the last season of his contract only (including any option years), who is making no more than 50% plus $100,000 of the disabled player’s salary, or the amount of the Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception plus $100,000, whichever is less.

For the Nets, this means they can sign or trade for a player up to the midlevel exception of $5.15 million (half of Lopez’ salary is $7.35 million).

It should be noted that because the Nets have a full roster they would need to waive a player to make room for another one, even with the DPE (thanks to Devin Kharpertian of The Brooklyn Game for the reminder). They could waive Tyshawn Taylor, Tornike Shengelia or Alan Anderson but they still have to pay those guys’ fully guaranteed deals.

Getting the DPE is one thing, using it is another. They might like to bring in another big man, but the pickings out there are pretty slim (unless they have another future asset they might give up in a trade, but not many of those left). This gives the Nets flexibility but they don’t have a lot of good options right now.

And whatever this player signs for gets added to what is already the highest payroll and tax in the league — they will be pushing $190 million in salary and tax before this signing. But that doesn’t seem to faze Prokhorov.

Nets’ Shengelia has knee surgery, could be out for chunk of season

Tornike Shengelia, Paul Pierce

Tornike Shengelia was not going to play a big role for the Nets this season — he played in just 19 games last season and didn’t exactly impress at Summer League in Orlando where he averaged 7.6 points a game on 35 percent shooting.

But any he hope he had of contributing much likely just went out the window.

The Nets announced he will have surgery to repair the meniscus in his left knee. This was an injury suffered while working out with the Georgian national team.

The timeline for Shengelia’s recovery will be announced after the surgery. Suffice to say he’s not going to be ready to go opening night and could potentially miss the entire season.

Report: Garnett signs off on trade that would send him, Pierce to Brooklyn

Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett

UPDATE #2 10:56 PM: Kevin Garnett will agree to waive his no-trade clause, clearing a major hurdle for the deal, according to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

That makes this deal far more likely. It is not finalized yet, and can’t be officially executed until July 10, but the teams are working to get the deal paramaters set by tomorrow. This looks like it could really happen.

UPDATE 5:50 pm: This trade is moving along and moving along quickly — the deal is in advanced talks and Kevin Garnett has had it presented to him to see if he would waive his no-trade clause, according to multiple reports.

The trade has actually grown to include more players, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

The talks are centering around a package that would include Gerald Wallace, Tornike Shengelia, the expiring deal of Kris Humphries and three future first-round picks (2014, ’16 and ’18), sources told Y! Sports.

Jason Terry also will be in the package going to the Nets, sources said. The Nets would send back Reggie Evans and do a sign-and-trade involving Keith Bogans and one more minimum-level player as part of package, a source said.

Marc Stein at ESPN reports Garnett has been approached about waiving his no trade clause to allow this deal.

The two sides could agree in principle to the trade in the next 24 hours, however it cannot be executed until July 10. That is because it requires Paul Pierce’s larger salary, which kicks in July 1, but there is a moratorium on trades being finalized at the start of the free agent period. That lasts until the 10th.

1:13 pm: If Nets GM Billy King can find a way to get out from under this roster he built, the man deserves a Harry Houdini award.

And he may have found his path — with the Boston Celtics.

The Nets and Celtics are discussing a blockbuster deal that would bring Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce to Brooklyn, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

The talks are centering around a package that would include Gerald Wallace, Tomike Shengelia, the expiring deal of Kris Humphries and three future first-round picks, sources told Y! Sports.

Garnett has yet to be approached about waiving his no-trade clause, sources said, but there’s a belief that he could be convinced of agreeing to a deal should the Celtics and Nets be able to reach an agreement on terms. No deal is imminent.

First, this is not going to be done fast — it couldn’t be completed until after the moratorium is lifted on July 10 (because of Pierce’s salary).

Boston certainly wants to try and move Pierce and Garnett together — that way KG is more likely to waive his no-trade clause — but that is a lot of salary to move and few teams would be willing to take it on. Brooklyn apparently will consider it.

Those picks are spread out over a few years and there are complications — the Atlanta Hawks have the right to switch first round picks with the Nets in 2014 or 2015. The Nets can’t trade picks in consecutive years so this would space out for a while.

If it came to pass — and that’s still a big “if” — it would give the Nets Deron Williams at the point, Brook Lopez at center, Garnett at the four and Pierce at the five. There would be a lot of tax to be paid but the team would be a bigger threat (if they can stay healthy) to the elite of the East.

The picks would matter to the rebuilding Boston Celtics, but they would then be trying to move Gerald Wallace and the three years, $30 million still on his deal. That contract is an anchor and would be the hard part of the deal for Boston to swallow.

Whenever they do move Pierce and Garnett, other questions come up for Boston: How far down does the rebuilding go? Do you move Rajon Rondo too? Do the Celtics go all in on the “Woeful for Wiggins” train?