Tag: Tim Hardaway Jr.

Thabo Sefolosha

Thabo Sefolosha: Too soon to say when I’ll play again


Thabo Sefolosha missed the playoffs after breaking his leg while being arrested.

Sefolosha blamed the police, and it seems a lawsuit is coming.

But what about Sefolosha’s return to the court?

The Hawks gave a six-month recovery period after his April surgery, which would have him back during the preseason. We’re through most of that period, but Sefolosha isn’t ready to update his timeline.

Sefolosha, via Chris Vivlamore of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

“I am doing better every day,” Sefolosha told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “The leg and ankle are feeling good but it is too early to say exactly when I’ll be back on the court.”

I’m unsure whether Sefolosha is just being discreet or actually too far from his return to estimate a date. Obviously, the latter would be much more troubling.

A healthy Sefolosha would be first in line to replace DeMarre Carroll, who signed with the Raptors, in the starting lineup. If Sefolosha can’t go, Tim Hardaway Jr., Kent Bazemore and Justin Holiday are candidates to join Kyle Korver on the wing

Carmelo Anthony downplays any issue over Porzingis pick

New York Knicks v Miami Heat

When he took to Twitter, you got the impression Carmelo Anthony didn’t love the Knicks trading Tim Hardaway Jr. away.

Then there were reports he did not like the drafting of Kristaps Porzingis — a player with a lot of potential but maybe three years away from actually helping the Knicks.

However, Anthony has since responded on Instagram to a fan and tried to downplay the drama (hat tip Eye on Basketball).



Of course, Anthony is going to back the company line publicly. He needed to, they are paying him to be the face of the franchise.

But he’s not afraid to throw a few elbows at fans either.


Fans bitter at how much money Anthony makes — or LeBron James, or Kobe Bryant, or… — need to have a discussion with society about how much we overvalue entertainers, then have a conversation with capitalism. Because the issue is a lot bigger than Anthony, if that’s your concern. Anthony makes what the market will pay for his skills. If you had his skills, you’d take the money and run.

Anthony is trying to downplay the drama; it’s the smart play.

But how patient are Knicks fans going to be next season? More importantly, how patient is James Dolan going to be?

Report: Carmelo Anthony feels betrayed by Phil Jackson drafting Kristaps Porzingis

Celebrity Sightings In New York City - May 07, 2015

Phil Jackson and Carmelo Anthony both thought the Knicks would make the playoffs last season.

New York, of course, went 17-65.

Jackson has adjusted to a more patient approach, drafting Kristaps Porzingis and trading Tim Hardaway Jr. for the rights to Jerian Grant.

Melo, reportedly, has not.

Stephen A. Smith of ESPN said Friday on Mad Dog Sports Radio on Melo’s reaction to the Knicks’ draft:

I talking to my sources last night. All they said was, he’s furious. He’s livid. He feels completely hoodwinked and betrayed by Phil Jackson. He feels like he was lied to, like he was sold a bill of goods. He knew that he couldn’t get as money anywhere else, and he’s willing to concede that he wanted his money. But he didn’t know it was going to be like this. He didn’t know it was going to be this bad. And he can’t believe that his second season under the Phil Jackson regime, he has to look forward to it being worse than even last year was.

Melo re-signed with a losing, aging, capped-out team. What did he expect?

If Jackson made any promises about a miracle turnaround, Melo was foolish for believing them.

The Knicks will have cap space, and it’s possible they land a second star who pushes them into contention. But that’s so unlikely.

Trying for a quick fix when one isn’t present would just worsen the problem. There was nobody to draft at No. 4 whom the Knicks could have reasonably expected would change their fortunes next year. Rookies need time to develop.

I understand Melo’s impatience. There’s a shelf-life on his playing career. But he put himself in this position. Any reasonable person could see the Knicks bottoming out, and Jackson thinking long-term is the best thing that could have happened to the franchise.

My advice to Melo: Enjoy your money. That’s what you chose. And, if you’re still upset, talk to the Knicks about a trade. I’m not sure how keen Jackson is on keeping a declining and overpaid 31-year-old, anyway – especially if he’s furious and livid.