Tag: Tim Donaghy

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Disgraced ref Tim Donaghy plans to attend NBA game … and is giving out betting advice


You remember the whole Tim Donaghy thing, right? He was the referee that was caught betting on NBA games he was officiating, and served over a year in prison after pleading guilty to charges related to the FBI investigation.

Now that he’s off probation, Donaghy is back, and wants to be involved with the NBA once again. Not as a referee or league employee this time, of course, but as a sports handicapper giving basketball betting advice while working for a gambling website.

The Sporting News has the story:

In the meantime, Donaghy is turning his attention to his new career as a sports handicapper for a gambling website.

“I’m moving on to another phase in my life and that is helping Danny B. and his clients.”

Danny B., aka Daniel T. Biancullo, is Donaghy’s boss and also a convicted felon. … The two previously worked together from October 2010 until July. But U.S. District Judge Carol Bagley Amon put an end to that, after it was revealed Biancullo had a past felony conviction on gambling-related charges. The terms of Donaghy’s probation prevented him from associating with felons.

Not exactly a surprise here, right? Donaghy is no different than most criminals, who once released from custody return to the very same activities that got them into trouble in the first place.

There’s one other part to this story, and it’s the one that likely got Donaghy this interview in the first place.

Donaghy is planning to attend an NBA game in person, his first since the scandal broke and his life was turned upside down. The plan is for Donaghy and Biancullo to be in the building for the Knicks’ home game against the Mavericks on Nov. 9.

“I don’t think there is any reason why they’d remove me from the stadium,” Donaghy told The Linemakers via phone from his Sarasota, Fla. home. “I’m there to take in a game and look at some live action and do a bit of scouting. I’m not even too sure that anyone is really going to notice me, to be honest with you.”

Obviously, this is completely ridiculous. NBA arenas are very large places. If Donaghy truly wanted to just take in a game for old times’ sake, all he’d have to do is buy a ticket, sit in his seat, and keep his mouth shut. No one is going to recognize him, unless of course he’s trying to drum up publicity for his latest commercial enterprise. Which is exactly what this is all about.

The appearance at Friday’s game has been planned for years. It’s a publicity stunt, Biancullo admits openly.

You think?

It’s uncertain whether the league will bother to intervene to prevent Donaghy from attending the game as planned; honestly, it doesn’t seem worth the trouble. It is a little sad that desperately grasping at the NBA in any way he can is all that Donaghy has left. But reminding fans of a scandal that put the credibility of the league they love in jeopardy isn’t going to endear him to anyone anytime soon.

Tim Donaghy, publisher split ways

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donaghy.jpgDisgraced former NBA referee Tim Donaghy and the publisher of his book, “Personal Foul,” will no longer be working together, according to Dan Devine of Yahoo! Sports. The book had been published by a company called VTi, but VTi CEO Shawna Vercher stated in an email that her company has “decided to terminate our relationship with Mr. Donaghy and will no longer be representing him as a client.” As for the book itself, the first edition has been “retired” and VTi “will not be distributing it in the future.” In his own email, Donaghy said that Four Daughters LLC will be publishing the second edition of his book. The book garnered a lot of attention because of Donaghy’s claim that it contained data about which referees have specific vendettas or biases that effect the outcome of a game. Most of the specific biases Donaghy mentions in the book were shown to not statistically exist by Henry Abbott and Kevin Arnovitz in a report last year. 

Donaghy and Vercher are telling very different stories about why their business relationship ended. According to Donaghy, the dispute is strictly financial — he claims that he has asked Vercher many times to “see where the money went” from the sales of the book, only to be denied that information, and that he “hasn’t received a dime” from book sales. 
Vercher gave very different reasons for why her company decided to terminate their relationship with Donaghy:
Vercher told BDL the relationship had broken down “over the last couple of months, coming to a boil over the last week or so,” when she alleges Donaghy began making “threats of violence.”
“He threatened to come here,” Vercher said, claiming that the prospect of Donaghy appearing at VTi’s Largo, Fla., offices in search of royalties (which she says were not yet available, terming the fiscal turnaround “not a fast process”) rankled her employees and frightened her.
“He mentioned that someone was going to come up here and get me, that they knew where I live,” Vercher said. “He made mention of his ties to members of the Gambino crime family, saying that they were active in our area.”
As the alleged threats against herself, her employees and her business escalated, Vercher said, she made the decision to cut the cord “for safety reasons.”

Donaghy vehemently denies Vercher’s claims, and stated that she is trying to profit off of his disgraced reputation. This will all become clearer in the next week or so, as Vercher has been served with a subpoena requiring that she present an accurate accounting of the total sales of “Personal Foul.” Meanwhile, Vercher will be seeking an order of protection in a Florida court, and claims to have evidence of some of the threats Donaghy has made against her. We’ll see how this all turns out. 

NBA Playoffs Suns Lakers Game 1: It's in the league's best interest to reel Phil Jackson in


Thumbnail image for NBA_philjackson.jpgIt seems like a fun little sideshow, doesn’t it? The grizzled veteran coach, waxing basketball philosophic and occasionally using his razor-sharp wit to jab at other players and the officials. A basketball legend using the media to gain as much leverage over the calls as he can get. It’s a charming story.

And it’s got to stop.

Yesterday, we clued you in to Phil Jackson’s latest dig at officiating related to Steve Nash and his penchant for “carrying.” It’s yet another in a long history of Jackson swinging out in officiating-related matters.

There’s been a lot of talk about increasing the punishment for coaches that complain about officiating. David Stern spoke about possibly suspensions, a notion Jackson laughed off while calling the commissioner by his first name. And yesterday’s little dig shows that he doesn’t actually think Stern will go far enough to lean on him. It’s a small, careful, and quiet comment that Stern can’t really punish him beyond fines which amount to asking someone for whatever they’ve got in their pockets.

If Stern’s serious about this, if he wants to make the point that coaches cannot, under any circumstances, attempt to influence officiating in any way, the next time Jackson speaks out, he’s got to suspend him. Especially if it happens in the next two weeks.

Bear in mind that this is a crucial time for the league’s public officiating situation. Tim Donaghy is still flitting around like a hobo trying to ask anyone outside the league’s office for money in exchange for his windshield wipers of allegations. But there have been no officiating disasters in the playoffs this year, unlike the Mavericks no-call among others last year. The league has a real chance to get past the lingering outside perception that certain officiating wrinkles are influenced by league folds.

But a mess in a series against the Suns from the most winningest franchise in NBA history?

That would be unfortunate timing.

The league already flinches every time the Robert Horry hipcheck and subsequent suspensions are shown. They flinch whenever discussion of the 2002 Game 6 are brought up. They flinch whenever Tim Donaghy’s involvement in both of those series are brought up. They don’t waver, but they flinch.

Ensuring that we don’t end up in a situation where the Lakers look like the favored son, where there’s no chance of Jackson successfully bending the officials knees to his liking, that’s a sound strategy to end the controversy. Allowing Jackson to flaunt whatever influence he wants is a flawed approach. The carrying issue is nothing, it’s a blip on the radar. But the league needs to be ready to suspend Phil Jackson, in a playoff series, if he seeks to influence the officiating again, even if he’s right.

The Lakers are more than capable of dismantling the Suns based solely on their basketball ability and length. Making sure there’s no funny business is a win-win for the league.

The questions about the league’s officiating history are on the ropes, dazed, and stunned. Phil Jackson is unknowingly, or unconcernedly slipping them Gatorade. It’s time for the Commissioner’s office to knock them out.

Tim Donaghy makes wildest claim yet, crosses about eight lines of decency


Tim Donaghy has no credibility. In addition to the fact he is a disgraced referee with a gambling problem who spent time in jail for his crimes, reasonable studies looking into his claims — people that broke down the numbers — showed he was full of crap. The claims he made turn out to be false.

So, the only way he can keep his name in the public eye is to make up more outlandish claims.

And now he has crossed all sorts of lines.

On the Celtics Late Night blog talk show, he said that referee Bill Kennedy is gay, and that he holds a grudge against the Celtics because Doc Rivers questioned his sexual orientation. (All this via Reds Army.) This led to calls against the Celtics, he claimed.

First, who cares who Kennedy sleeps with? I honestly have no idea and nor do I care. What matters is the quality of his officiating. It’s a non-issue.

Second, Donaghy’s claims have all been crap so far, there is no need to buy this one. It is going to get a lot of media attention (and frankly I had a crisis of conscious about running it and talked with my bosses). But know that it is crap.

Go and read the work TrueHoop — Henry Abbott and Kevin Arnovitz — did. His claims do not stand up to any rigorous test, and there is a lot more research that will come out saying the same thing. So we put out there what he said, but add that the source is crap and, frankly, we doubt that the bias would stand up to any real test.