Tag: Three-point shooting


All-Star Saturday/Dunk Contest live blog

Saturday night’s alright for… dunk contests. And if you throw in a Skills Contest we’ll take it. No, we don’t really want the Shooting Stars, it’s okay.

We’re going to be chatting live through all of it, feel free to jump in and have some fun.

[coveritlive src=”http://www.coveritlive.com/index2.php/option=com_altcaster/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=b6a400e736/height=550/width=470″%5D

More Ray Allen love from the game’s elite shooters

Ray Allen, Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce
Leave a comment

Friday has been a day of tributes to Ray Allen — and he deserves it. Guy’s a legend. An icon. Now the greatest three point shooter in the history of the NBA.

One of the more interesting ones comes from A. Sherrod Blakely at CSNNE.com. He went and talked to the five other active players in the all-time top 10 for three pointers made to get their thoughts on shooting and Allen. It’s a great read.

That list includes Jason Kidd — yes, really — and former teammate of Allen in Seattle Rashard Lewis, who said he learned a lot from Ray-Ray.

“His preparation,” Lewis said, “is second to none. That’s something that I really picked up from him that, if you want to be a great player in this league, you have to work at your game and never be satisfied.”

Like the rest of us hacks, Peja Stojakovic envies the style.

“Ray is an unbelievable shooter,” Stojakovic said. “His form, release, everything is perfect. You can see he’s so focused when he shoots. It doesn’t really matter what the defense is doing.”

Also on that list, Jason Terry. (That’s two Mavs on the list, opposing teams may want to take note of that when devising defensive game plans.)

“Obviously, we know who the pioneer was for our era; it was Reggie Miller,” Terry said. “He set the bar. And now Ray Allen has raised that bar. His longevity, the way he has been able to do it, and for how long he’s been doing it for, I want to continue to do that. Once he leaves, hopefully I’ll just slide right on in.”

Video: Ray Allen becomes king of the three

Image (1) Allen_pure-thumb-250x301-13052.jpg for post 2373
1 Comment

Ray Allen has as pure a stroke as the Association has ever seen.

The three-pointer he drained Thursday night to pass Reggie Miller and become the NBA’s all time leader in three pointers made was a classic Ray Allen play. He filled the lane on the break, stopped up at the arc and when the pass came his way it was one fluid motion to the release.

Watch and enjoy a pure shooter.

Tonight is Ray Allen’s record night. Maybe.

Orlando Magic v Boston Celtics

Ray Allen needs to drain just two more threes to become the NBA’s all-time leader in three-pointers made.

It’s hard to picture a more perfect setting to break the record than tonight: At Boston Garden in a nationally televised game against the Los Angeles Lakers with Reggie Miller, the current record holder, an analyst on the broadcast. (We use the term analyst loosely with Miller.) Allen has 2,559 right now, Miller 2,560.

It should be a coronation, fitting of a guy with as pretty a shooting stroke as the league as ever seen. A guy with a fierce work ethic. A guy who deserves the record.

It’s all perfect, except…

In four of the seven finals games last season, Allen didn’t hit one three against the Lakers (as Zach Lowe pointed out at The Point Forward).

The Lakers usually have Derrick Fisher chasing Ray Allen off his many screens (while Kobe Bryant gets the Rajon Rondo assignment). But they do switch that off at times. The Lakers staff has said what they don’t want is Allen to get hot early because then things steamroll with him and the Celtics.

Of course, tonight you can bet the Celtics will be feeding him early and often to get the record.

As they should — Allen is hitting 46.2 percent of his threes this season. For his career he has hit 39.8 percent from beyond the arc. And as he told the Boston Globe this is not a one-night thing. This is what he has worked for.

“I’m here because of the preparation that I put in my whole career,” Allen said.

Game of the Night: Suns bury Lakers with 22 threes

1 Comment

What a crazy game in Los Angeles. The Phoenix Suns managed to hand the Lakers their first home loss of the season despite losing their starting center (and the only Phoenix player who would have had a chance of keeping the Lakers off the boards) early in the game, but it was far from easy. Even though the Suns hit 22 of their 40 three-point attempts, one make shy of an NBA record, the Suns needed a crazy three from Hedo Turkoglu and a controversial technical on Lamar Odom to escape Los Angeles with a five-point win.

For the majority of the game, it seemed like the Suns were simply delaying an inevitable Laker blowout. Phoenix’s big men had little hope of keeping the Lakers away from the basket before Robin Lopez went down with a knee injury — after that happened, things just became comical. The Lakers got to the rim seemingly at will for much of the game, using crisp passing, strong drives, and lots of movement off the ball to get easy looks at the rim over and over and over again. Lamar Odom was particularly effective when he put the ball on the floor and went to the basket, and the Suns had no prayer against Pau Gasol when he got the ball near the rim. On top of that, Kobe was being Kobe, whether he was setting his teammates up with crisp passes, making shots from the mid-post, or up-faking his man, stepping through him, and passing off the backboard to himself for a layup.

When the Lakers missed a shot, they would often just get the ball right back again — Channing Frye had no prayer of effectively boxing out Pau Gasol, Lamar Odom kept coming out of nowhere to grab the ball after Laker misses, and the Suns were simply unable to gain possession of loose caroms for most of the game.

After the game, Suns coach Alvin Gentry talked about his team’s inability to keep Gasol off the boards, saying “You know we’ve still got to try and stop the rebounding situation, but Pau is just so long, we have him boxed out, he goes over the back but doesn’t foul…he’s just so long, our guys try to get a body on him and we just couldn’t. It wasn’t that we weren’t trying to win, that we weren’t playing hard and trying to be physical with him, we just couldn’t move him out. And that’s a credit to Pau more than it is a negative to our guys.”

The Lakers’ size advantage was overpowering — the Lakers outscored the Suns by 40 points in the paint, and had 20 offensive rebounds to the Suns’ 22 defensive rebounds. 99 times out of 100, the team that controls the paint like the Lakers did on Sunday will win the game, but that wasn’t the case against the Suns.

How did the Suns overcome the Lakers’ size and strength mismatch? They hit threes. A lot of them. The Suns found themselves open from beyond the arc early and often against the Lakers, and their shooters weren’t afraid to let fly. The Suns did a great job of moving the ball from side to side, staying away from isolation play, spacing the floor, and keeping the Lakers off-balance in both the half-court and transition game. The Laker forwards were able to overpower the Suns when Los Angeles had the ball, but they often seemed a step slow on the opposite side of the floor, either leaving Channing Frye or Hedo Turkoglu open beyond the arc or being forced to switch onto a guard. Lamar Odom had a particularly uneven defensive game — there were times he would go to give help and appear to simply forget that Channing Frye and Hedo Turkoglu love to shoot threes.

Jason Richardson, Channing Frye, and Hedo Turkoglu absolutely killed the Lakers from deep by camping out on the weak side in the half-court and trailing the break — that kind of shooting would be impressive in an empty gym, but it also seemed like the Lakers were giving up open three-point looks because they thought the Suns would eventually start missing and they could simply outscore Phoenix when the Suns started to miss.

Unfortunately for the Lakers, the Suns never stopped missing. During one four-and-a-half minute stretch in the third quarter, the Suns made six straight three-pointers, and it got to the point where the Staples center crowd would begin groaning as the shots were in the air. When asked after the game if he thought the Suns’ three-point shooting would cool down, Kobe Bryant said “that’s what normally happens, but tonight it didn’t. They just continued to make them.”

A stretch like that would have buried most teams, but the Lakers were resilient, and were in the game for most of the fourth quarter thanks to some big threes from Shannon Brown and some missed threes by the Suns. The turning point of the game was a controversial one. With 53 seconds remaining, Lamar Odom made a layup that put the Lakers down by two points. There was some contact on the play, and Odom wanted to get an and-1 call and a chance to bring the Lakers within a point. He didn’t get the call, and was fairly demonstrative to the ref, who slapped him with a technical. After the Suns hit the resulting free throw and Hedo Turkoglu nailed a deep, flat-footed, contested three over Kobe Bryant on the next Suns possession, the game was all but over.

After the game, Kobe called the technical on Odom “disgusting, in that situation.” Odom himself said “It’s tough, you know, it’s tough. There were 55 seconds left. I think that’s why people are questioning it. But a rule’s a rule.”

After the game, both coaches were in awe of Phoenix’s hot shooting. Phil Jackson said in his post-game press conference that “Our philosophy is that [the three-pointers] even out over time, but they didn’t tonight. A team’s going to make a certain percentage of threes. If they make ten in a ball game that’s a high number; this team averages 9, so that’s a really high number. The real issue is about those other 80 points they got in the paint.”

Suns coach Alvin Gentry was of the opinion that Sunday’s outcome was more the  result of Phoenix’s insanely hot shooting rather than anything the Lakers did wrong. When asked about the Lakers, who have dropped their last two games, Gentry went into a comic outrage, saying “It’s one game! We made 22 threes, and still had to hold them off at the end! People are talking like their season is over!” before breaking into a wide smile. The Lakers were a little nonchalant defensively against the Suns and gave Phoenix more good looks than they should have had, but the fact the Lakers were in this game up until Phoenix’s 22nd three is a far more significant long-term takeaway than their two straight losses. The Lakers are good. Scary good. But for one night, Phoenix’s near-historic shooting allowed them to be just a little bit better.