Tag: technical fouls

Boston Celtics v Orlando Magic, Game 5

Winderman: Technical fouls more expensive with shortened season


The upside of the NBA’s lockout-compacted 66-game schedule? It can shorten the lengths of previously handed-down suspensions, with Andrew Bynum and Charlie Villanueva receiving that benefit of the doubt to start the season.

The downside? Less tolerance from big brother, namely NBA czar of discipline Stu Jackson.

While much was made publicly of the league reducing the season-opening suspensions of Bynum and Villanueva by one game apiece, from the original five-game length because of 2011-12 being reduced from 82 to 66 games, a similar proportional change in the rules regarding technical fouls this season has gone largely unnoticed.

Last season, a player’s first five technical fouls cost $2,000 apiece; this season the first four are set at that amount.

Last season, the 6th through 10th technical fouls were $3,000 each; this season the $3,000 charge applies for Nos. 5 through 8.

Last season, Nos. 11-15 costs $4,000 each; this season the $4,000 charge is for Nos. 9-12.

And last season, each technical foul No. 16 or above cost $5,000; this season it’s $5,000 for each technical No. 13 and above.
But the biggest change in the reapportionment is not with the scale of fines, but rather when a mandatory one-game suspension kicks in. Last season it started at No. 16; this season it will start at No. 13.

Teams were informed of the changes on the eve of the season.

So could it lead to greater restraint?

“With technical fouls going up, I might need a little help this year,” Heat power forward Udonis Haslem said of otherwise generally being the first one jumping into heated situations. “But you don’t really think about the money. You don’t really think about what you’re sacrificing.”

The league, however, made it clear to teams what that sacrifice would be.

“It’s getting more expensive this year,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter @IraHeatBeat.

Kendrick Perkins explains why the Thunder need technicals

Oklahoma City Thunder Center Kendrick Perkins (5) And Denver Nuggets Center Nene (31) From Brazil Go Toe To Toe

In Kendrick Perkins world, there are good technical fouls and bad technical fouls.

Bad ones? Taking too long to shoot a free throw then throwing the ball away from the refs. Especially when that gets you suspended.

Good technicals? Perkins has been T’d up five times since coming to the Thunder, and he told Darnell Mayberry of the Oklahoman why that is a good thing.

“It’s times that you can get a good tech,” Perkins explained. “You set the tone every now and then.”

Most of Perkins’ five technical fouls in a Thunder uniform have come from altercations with opposing players. Jawing. Pushing. Stare downs. That sort of stuff. But Perkins doesn’t think techs of that variety are a problem. In those situations, Perkins said he’s intentionally pushing other players’ buttons. He’s playing the role of the schoolyard bully, testing and taunting his competition to see how far they’ll allow him to go….

“I try to pick and choose (when talking to referees),” Perkins said. “Sometimes it may look like I’m attacking the ref or swearing or cursing at a ref but I’m not. Sometimes I’m just telling him to get his head in the game or something to that nature.

“As I got older, I developed good relationships with the guys so they know how I am and they have a higher tolerance for me. And I know how to approach them. I just pick and choose. Some days I try to get a tech. Other days, I just mess with them every now and then.”

Perkins was brought in to bring some toughness to the Thunder, to be fierce inside in a way the team had not been before. With that will come some technicals. Part of the price. Perkins is going to pay a few fines.

And when he does, his teammates should buy him dinner.

Stan Van Gundy defends Dwight Howard, invites fine from Stern

Orlando Magic v Phoenix Suns

That’s going to cost Stan Van Gundy.

He probably thinks it’s money well spent. Monday, before Dwight Howard sat out the Magic’s loss due to a suspension for his 16th technical of the season, Magic coach Van Gundy came to Howard’s defense.

Van Gundy went with the argument that has been used for Shaq, Kareem, probably George Mikan back in the day, saying they take a lot more punishment than most players. The Orlando Sentinel gives us the goods.

Citing a statistic he credited to the Elias Sports Bureau, Van Gundy said Howard has been fouled 593 times this season and that none of the opponents who committed those infractions has received a flagrant foul on any of those plays.

“You guys can estimate how many of those were hard hits and how many of those were above the shoulders,” Van Gundy said to reporters after the Magic completed their shootaround.

“And for him to retaliate as few times as he has? By the way, not one of those 593 hits, with so many of those being above the shoulders and hard, not one has been deemed a flagrant foul. Not one. Five hundred and ninety-three. Amazing restraint for those guys to hit him that hard and not go over the line and get a flagrant foul. Getting no protection from the referees, he’s only retaliated from that a handful of times.”

Van Gundy went on and on about beating up people on a treadmill to make his point. He kind of started to lose us there.

He really lost us with this quote, from the Associated Press, where Van Gundy gets in his dig at Stern.

“This is the system David Stern and his minions like it,” Van Gundy said. “So that’s the system you have…I certainly can’t have an opinion because David Stern, like a lot or leaders we’ve seen in this world lately, don’t really tolerate other people’s opinion or free speech or anything. So I’m not really allowed to have an opinion. So it’s up to him.”

“He decides and he likes the system he has.”

Um, okay, you lost me. I’m not Stern’s biggest fan, but to compare him to power hungry Middle Eastern dictators who kill the opposition? That’s too far. David Stern is not Moammar Gadhafi.

That will get your fined. But your point about Howard is taken.

Dwight Howard has a technical problem

Boston Celtics v Orlando Magic, Game 5
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Friday night, Dwight Howard picked up technical foul number 15 on the season, helping extend his league lead.

Once he gets his “frequent techicals rewards card” stamped one more time gets an automatic one-game suspension.

It’s really a matter of when — he has averaged a technical every four games this season and the Magic have 23 games left. Even on his best behavior he’s going to get another. Since he gets another one-game suspension for every second technical after 16, he may well miss a couple more games this season.

Then comes the playoffs.

Get seven technical in the playoffs and you are suspended a game (everyone’s total resets to zero). That may seem like a lot, but with emotions higher and the games more intense in the playoffs, technical fouls flow like water sometimes. Kendrick Perkins would have been suspended for a game in the Eastern Conference Finals last season if one technical assessed had not been rescinded by the league.

It will be interesting to see how much the referees relax the “respect the game” techs during the heated playoffs. If at all.

The playoffs are when Howard will really need to control himself. We’ve got questions about whether these Magic are contenders, but if they are to seriously challenge the Celtics and Heat at the top of the East, Howard has to be at the heart of the attack. Every game. He is riding and pushing his teammates right now, trying to get the team back up to the East’s elite. He is putting up monster numbers — averaging 27 and 15 while shooting 67.3 percent in his last 10 games — trying to carry his team up to the next level. He’s even hitting free throws.

He’s going to have to do all that and more come the playoffs for the Magic to really have a chance. Which means he needs to stay on the court.

Basically, starting today, he’s got to get the technical down to a minimum. Because this team needs him on the court to have any chance.

It’s not Stephen Jackson, it’s those referees that have it in for him

Stephen Jackson, Mark Ayotte
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Stephen Jackson will take your technical and not apologize for his actions. He owned up to his situation.

His agent, he’s more conspiracy theorist, and that comes across when he spoke with ESPN. It is clear the referees are singling him out, agent Mark Stevens said.

“The inconsistency of the referees’ calls or non-calls in close games is becoming questionable,” Stevens said in a telephone interview on Thursday. “It looks like they’re taking the player and/or his personality into account when deciding whether or not to make calls.”

“The referees are the law enforcement arm of the game,” Stevens said. “They enforce the rules and regulations that the players must abide by. However, just as profiling is wrong in police work, we must make sure that the league does not do personal profiling of certain players.

“I understand that my player has had past conflicts with the referees, but their job is to be as fair as possible when calling the game, regardless of any past issues with a player.”

I don’t think Stevens is totally wrong here. The calling of the “respect the game” technicals is wildly inconsistent. The first thing to pop into mind is the double given at the end of the Mavericks and Kings game this week, where Tyson Chandler and DeMarcus Cousins got tossed for trying to get position for a free throw rebound (there was nothing on that play that doesn’t happen a dozen times a game). It ended up being Cousin’s sixth foul and took him out at the end of a close game.

I’d also agree certain players seem to get T’d up more quickly for doing less. Dwight Howard gets a lot of borderline calls against him. Maybe Jackson does, too.

But Jackson’s problem isn’t the first tech he draws, it’s that he doesn’t stop talking and complaining and that’s when he draws the second. And gets tossed. That one is on Jackson, not the official. When you are the team’s leading scorer you need to keep a cool enough head to stay on the floor. Jackson may get picked on, but if he’s to be a true leader he has to rise above it.