Tag: Steve Novak

Derrick Favors, Gordon Hayward, Quin Snyder

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 NBA Preview: Utah Jazz


Last season: The Jazz were not good, a 25-win team well out of the playoffs in the West. But frankly that was kind of the plan. They are rebuilding through the draft and that takes time, that takes putting your young players out on the court and letting them make mistakes and develop. What really held the Jazz back at the start of the season was Trey Burke being out with a thumb injury — he was clear and away the best point guard on the team and they were better on offense with him back (although still 25th in the NBA in points per possession). The real problem was they were the worst defensive team in the league. By a lot.

Signature highlight from last season: If you’re looking for one play that could foreshadow hope for the future, how about this game winning three against the Magic.

Although… it’s hard not to go with this.

Key player changes: The biggest change wasn’t a player it was the coach — gone is Tyron Corbin, in comes Quin Snyder, who was one of the top assistants in the league and spent years with the Spurs organization. Snyder is known as a player development guy (the Spurs are good at that, in case you missed it) and a discipline guy, two things very much needed with the young Jazz.

As for the roster of players, the big move was matching the four-year, $63 million max offer Charlotte made to Gordon Hayward. He’s getting paid like a foundational piece now. The team drafted Dante Exum and Rodney hood, while adding veterans Trevor Booker and Steve Novak. Gone are Marvin Williams, Richard Jefferson, and Andris Biedrins. Well, mostly just Biedrins’ contract.

Keys to the Jazz season:

Player development. Let’s just be clear: The Jazz are not going to be a good basketball team this season. They are not going to reach the playoffs, they are not going to reach .500, they will not pass “go” and will not collect $200. But paired with that statement needs to be this: The Jazz have assembled one of the better core group of young players in the league (15 guys invited to training camp were under age 25). I think they still lack a true No. 1, but their roster has potential. They key is getting that out of the players. This is another season about building for the future, showing signs of improvement, and player development — there was too little of that under Corbin and Snyder needs to change that dynamic. Jazz management has said wins are not the measuring stick and this year they shouldn’t be, but there needs to be real progress.

The Jazz now have paid Gordon Hayward and Derrick Favors like foundational players, they need to step up and lead like it. Trey Burke showed promise as a rookie but has big steps to make still. Rudy Gobert showed promise at the World Cup for France, he needs to build on that and be the shot blocker the Jazz need. I am firmly in the “I like Dante Exum” camp but he is a genuine project a couple years out from really paying off and Snyder has a lot to do there. The biggest questions to answer this year is just how good are Enes Kanter and Alec Burks — both can be restricted free agents next summer (assuming a deal on an extension is not reached by Halloween) and the Jazz need to decide how much they are willing to pay to keep them in the fold.

Play some defense. The Jazz were the worst defensive team in the NBA last season, giving up 109.1 points per 100 possessions (via NBA.com). To say their help defensive rotations were bad would be to acknowledge their existence, not sure I can do that. All this needs to change. There has been a lot of talk around the Jazz about revamping and upgrading the offensive sets, but that’s all moot if they don’t get stops. Between Kanter, Favors and Gobert someone needs to become a feared shot blocker. Utah has to get better defensively on the perimeter. They just need to be better everywhere, frankly.

Who is the go-to scorer? For all the things to like about the young core on this team, it still feels like a roster loaded with good young complimentary players lacking that elite, superstar, Top 10 guy to lead them. That can show in crunch time — who gets the rock? The first answer here might be Gordon Hayward because he is often the guy with the ball in his hands anyway, a guy who can create some looks for himself and others, plus he’s now getting paid like an alpha dog. When I saw Hayward at Team USA camp in Las Vegas the first thing you notice is he’s filled out physically a little and will be stronger, which would help in this role. However, I think this could become Trey Burke’s role — he showed it at Michigan and again last season at points (see the video above) that he is cool under pressure. He just can make big plays. That said, the Jazz don’t really have a “clear out the side and isolate our star” kind of guy on the roster, so Snyder needs to run plays, not just isos.

You’re young — get out and run. All that young talent, dynamic playmakers in the open court like Burke and Hayward, bigs who can run the floor like Favors, and the Jazz played at the 26th fastest pace in the NBA last season. Not good. This team doesn’t have to play at a Showtime Lakers pace, but get out and run and pick up some easy buckets in transition. Create mismatches before the defense can get set then exploit them. Make things easier on yourself. Snyder has said that is the plan, but every coach says he wants he is team to play faster next year. We need to see it.

Why you should watch the Jazz: This is a young, dynamic, improving team that has a lot of potential — Favors is a quality big man inside, Hayward has a well-rounded game out on the wing, Burke is a good young point guard, plus there are guys poised to make a step forward in Burks, Kanter and Gobert. This is a team on the rise and those are always the most fun to watch.

Prediction: 33-49, which lands them back in the lottery and not with a thrilling record, but this needs to be a bridge season to better things in the coming years. If they play better defense, run more, find those go-to scorers and if Hayward steps up this is a season that can be a step forward, it’s just hard to predict that translating to many more wins because they are in the brutal Western Conference. The measuring stick shouldn’t be wins, it should be if we see development to what could be wins in a couple years. The Jazz have been amassing young talent for a while, it’s time for some of that to start paying off.

Five-year old boy with leukemia breaks ankles, dunks for Jazz in scrimmage (VIDEO)


That, ladies and gentlemen, is JP Gibson.

The 5-year-old battling lymphoblastic leukemia was signed to a one-day contract with the Utah Jazz and took part in the team’s blue and white scrimmage Monday (along with taking part in a full Utah Jazz day). And the kid showed some moves, just breaking the ankles of Steve Novak, blowing by Dante Exum and throwing it down by using Rudy Gobert as a human trampoline (or crane, I guess).

That is a great moment. And a very classy move by the Jazz.

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 Preview: Toronto Raptors

Brooklyn Nets v Toronto Raptors - Game Seven

Last season: The Raptors had one of the most satisfying regular seasons in the league. Their 48-34 record was a franchise best, and fans really embraced the team after it traded Rudy Gay. The deal with the Kings cleared the way for the Raptors to elevate young and likable players, assembling a starting lineup of Kyle Lowry, Terrence Ross, DeMar DeRozan, Amir Johnson and Jonas Valanciunas.

DeRozan became an All-Star. Lowry was even better. Valanciunas grew into a larger role, and Ross is following right behind him. Johnson was the glue that held everything together.

It really worked.

But Toronto ran into the experienced Nets in the first round of the playoffs, and Brooklyn upset the third-seeded Raptors in seven games.

Signature highlight from last season: The Raptors established an identity after the Gay trade – feisty and confident. Toronto general manager Masai Ujiri showcased that when he addressed fans before Game 1 against the Nets, shouting “F— Brooklyn:”

If you want something on the court, Lowry made an awesome buzzer-beating 3-pointer in the Raptors’ Game 5 win over the Nets. That series really was something.

Key player changes:

Keys to the Raptors season:

Kyle Lowry (and everyone) staying hungry: Lowry got into better shape last season. He stopped frequently fighting with coaches, and he became a better teammate. That led to the best season of his career.

Oh, by the way, he was in a contract year.

Has Lowry really turned a corner, or did the prospect of a big paycheck just temporarily convince Lowry to change his act?

The answer to that question will determine the Raptors’ fate, not only this season but in coming years. They gave Lowry a four-year, $48 million contract this offseason.

Based on last year’s team success, they also generously re-signed Patrick Patterson and Greivis Vasquez for north of $6 million per season each.

Will everyone remain as motivated as they were last year? Lowry will set the tone.

The value of continuity: On the flip side of the motivational question, the Raptors return their six most-used players from a season ago – DeRozan, Lowry, Valanciunas, Johnson, Ross and Vasquez. They can really settle into Dwane Casey’s system.

Really, the Raptors were two different teams last season – the one before the Gay trade and the one after. That second team had a limited amount of time to grow together, making up for it with a noticeable excitement for playing together. A little more seasoning could really pay dividends, especially in the postseason.

An improved bench: Lou Williams adds scoring punch, and James Johnson brings quality defense with some all-around offensive skills. Plus, Patterson returns to stretch the floor, and Vasquez is back to play behind and with Lowry.

Toronto’s bench is deeper and more complete, giving Casey potential to find some intriguing lineups and rest his starters.

Jonas Valanciunas and Terrence Ross continuing to develop: Valanciunas looked like a future All-Star, and Ross had a 51-point game. Toronto couldn’t have asked for much more from those players in their second years.

But as Valanciunas and Ross step into their third seasons, expectations get higher. Both players must show the skills they flashed last season in more consistent doses.

Lowry and DeRozan are closer to their peaks, so the for the Raptors to reach the next level, the onus is on Valanciunas and Ross.

Why you should watch: If the Raptors merely copy what they do last season, they’re a lot of fun. They play physically and energetically, really forcing opponents to play their best. This is a team on the rise.

Prediction: 48-34, No. 3 seed in the East and a playoff-series victory. Matching their record and seed from last season might seem like a failure for the Raptors, but the East is deeper. A repeat would be a success – as long as the playoff outcome changes. Toronto is more experienced and more talented this season, and I think that gets them over the hump. The Raptors might not be in the same class as the Cavaliers and Bulls, but they’re my pick – over the Wizards, Bobcats, Heat, Nets, Hawks and whomever else – to rise to the top of that crowded next tier.

Stephen Curry’s list of best shooters ever is full of people close to him

2011 T-Mobile Rookie Challenge and Youth Jam

Stephen Curry, in a Sports Illustrated interview (hat tip: CSN Bay Area), was asked about the best shooters in the NBA right now.

Curry’s top five:

  • Stephen Curry
  • Klay Thompson
  • Kyle Korver
  • Steve Novak
  • Ray Allen

My top five:

  • Stephen Curry
  • Klay Thompson
  • Kyle Korver
  • Mike Miller
  • Wesley Matthews

We mostly overlap, and I don’t think his list is unreasonable. Allen definitely has the career résumé, but I don’t think he’s quite elite anymore, and I believe Matthews is chronically overlooked in these rankings.

Overall, I think Curry is on the right track.

But he was also asked the best shooters of all time, and that’s where we differ more.

Curry’s top five:

  • Reggie Miller
  • Dell Curry
  • Stephen Curry
  • Steve Kerr
  • Ray Allen

My top five:

  • Ray Allen
  • Reggie Miller
  • Dale Ellis
  • Kyle Korver
  • Peja Stojakovic

Curry is close with all three of his players who differ from mine. One (Kerr) is his head coach with the Warriors. Another (Dell Curry) is his dad. And the third is himself.

So, maybe Curry is a bit biased.

But all three choices are definitely defensible. Kerr is the al-time leader in 3-point percentage (45.4). Dell Curry was ahead of his time as an outside shooter, and I believe Stephen Curry will retire as the best shooter of all time. I just don’t think he’s played long enough to justify inclusion in the top five yet.

Report: Raptors sign James Johnson to two-year deal

Toronto Raptors v Memphis Grizzlies

When the Raptors traded James Johnson for a second-round pick in 2012one year after acquiring him for a first-round pick – there were somewhat-conflicting explanations for the trade.

Doug Smith of the Toronto Star emphasized the roster makeup:

“James is a tremendous athlete who has a toughness you love,” said Raptors coach Dwane Casey. “With the abundance of wings we have, there would not have been enough minutes.”

Ryan Wolstat of the Toronto Suns emphasized Johnson’s relationship with Casey while acknowledging a crowded roster:

The Raptors and Johnson did not see eye-to-eye over his role and at one point last season Johnson was benched by Casey for a pair of games after an undisclosed indiscretion, though the coach insisted that was not the reason he was moved.

“We had our moments like you’re always going to do,” Casey said. “All the great athletes, it doesn’t bother me whatsoever, but we just had a glut of wings. James would not have been happy in that situation, competing for those minutes from the start.

The Raptors still have wing depth (though a little less after trading Steve Novak to the Jazz), and they still have Casey.

And, once again, they’ll have Johnson.

Doug Smith of The Toronto Star:

Johnson had a fairly strong season in Memphis before being arrested for domestic assault in June. He pleaded not guilty, but the charge – including nasty allegations of slapping and choking his wife – likely lowered his stock in free agency.

It’s possible Johnson contributes to the Raptors, who probably didn’t need to extend a large contract offer given the circumstances. First, he must address this important issue in his personal life.