Tag: South Florida All-Star Classic

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Carmelo Anthony to host the next star-studded exhibition game in NYC

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Sunday’s South Florida All-Star Classic was the grandest of the NBA exhibitions to date, but it was nonetheless a single game in a series of similar contests. The summer of pro-am hoops has stretched into the fall of pro-am hoops, so much so that the idea for the next big exhibition game took mere moments to spawn following the conclusion of the Sunday’s festivities.


For those waiting for the details with bated breath, Marc Berman of the New York Post (via ESPN New York) has you covered :

Nothing is set in stone, but Anthony believes he, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Chris Paul and friends will stage a big exhibition in the Big Apple.

“We’re going to keep giving back,” Anthony said.

On his Twitter account yesterday, Anthony started banging the drums for his Big Apple charity-fest. “Working on an epic exhibition charity game in NYC,” he wrote. “Showtime. I’m comin’ home.”

I certainly won’t argue with charity; the more Anthony, James, et al can raise for a good cause, the better. There is a linear payoff in getting funding and supplies to organizations and people in need, and it’s terrific that this group of players will be able to generate money to benefit others.

That said, we’re well past exhibition fatigue at this point. Basketball fans have become accustomed to a certain standard, and honestly, the level of basketball being played is only one component of that standard. The NBA is a league that hosts competitive games, but it also hosts a conversation. There’s an active, evolving discourse that gravitates around the game, and that just isn’t possible with a series of exhibitions. It’s great that NBA players are involved in basketball in some public capacity during the ongoing lockout, but these exhibitions provide a two-dimensional substitute for a three-dimensional product. It’s basketball, and basketball involving some of the NBA’s most incredible stars, at that. But it’s a brand of basketball that separates the sport from its deeper value.

There will always be something in that bouncing ball, regardless of setting. Just don’t expect ten players — even ten of the best players — and a hoop to recapture what has granted NBA basketball its magic. These games don’t even hit in the same register as the NBA game, much less reach the same notes; exhibition basketball lives in the absence of nuance, and as a result, distills a beautiful game to nice dunks and gaudy stats. It’s fun, but broad fun, devoid of the character that makes the NBA the best sports league on the planet.

So do your thing, Melo. Shoot some hoops, donate some money to charity, and give back to the fans who dig this kind of thing. But the rest of us are still waiting, and these contests don’t do much to satiate our specific hunger.

South Florida All-Star Classic hosted by LeBron and Wade reminds us of what we’ll miss

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There have been plenty of recreational, pickup, and charity basketball games this summer that featured various groups of NBA stars showcasing their talents. But arguably none of them were as star-studded or as competitive as the South Florida All-Star Classic at Florida International University on Saturday, hosted by LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh.

Largely absent from this one was the high volume of crazy dunks, sick passes, and overall spectacular plays that we’ve come to expect when a majority of the game’s best players converge on a single court, but it was with good reason: The players seemed genuinely invested in whether or not their team would win or lose. As a result, not only was there actual defense played, but players went hard at each other, and with a more serious demeanor than we’ve seen at any of these types of games since the lockout began.

Carmelo Anthony, for example, seemed determined not to let Kevin Durant get going, and bodied him up with an aggressive and physical defensive display — even away from the ball — that we rarely see from the Knicks All-Star. Amar’e Stoudemire was consistent in providing weak-side defensive help, and had some physical possessions of his own against a noticeably-bulkier Bosh. And of course, Wade spent some time defending James, and did so with enough strength to make sure his Miami Heat teammate was unable to back him down in the post.

Add in the fact that the game was whistled so tightly down the stretch that James had conversations with the officials after seemingly every possession, and you definitely got the vibe that this game meant something. It came down to the wire, and featured a big-time clutch three-pointer from Anthony which tied it up for Team Wade and sent the festivities into overtime. That was when we saw LeBron try to attack Wade down low, but he had to settle for free throws after spinning past him and being fouled by Stoudemire coming over to help.

With Wade’s team having sealed the game by securing a four-point lead with just a couple of seconds to play, James ended it by pulling up for a jumper from half-court, which swished through the hoop as if he had only shot it from 15 feet out, as opposed to 50.

All in all, it was a competitive, fan-friendly event that was as close to real basketball as we’ve seen since the NBA concluded its season in June. The game benefited the Mary’s Court Foundation, established by Isiah Thomas and his wife in 2010 primarily for the purposes of youth academic success, increased school attendance and higher graduation rates.

source:  Nike provided the uniforms for the event, which had S.F.A.S.C. on the front, and BBNS where the names would normally be on the back — short for “BasketBall Never Stops,” the mantra the company has been repeating all summer as a reminder that for the players who truly love the game, there is no offseason.

Nike also used the event to debut the LeBron 9 “Cannon” edition, which James wore on the court, and which hit the Miami House of Hoops in limited quantities later that night. The Miami release was the first LeBron 9 to hit stores in North America, and was released exclusively in Miami as a sign of appreciation and respect for LeBron’s South Florida fans and community.

Afterward, James took the microphone at center court, and, surrounded by the rest of the stars who participated, gave a heart-felt message to the fans in attendance.

“There’s no us without you guys,” James said. “[Without] every last one of you guys, there’s no us as players. Thank you all. Thank you so much. We appreciate every last one of you.”

There was no doubting the sincerity of LeBron’s words. And the respect, effort, passion, and intensity he and the rest of the players brought to the game was a vivid yet all-too-brief reminder of exactly what we’ll be missing if the lockout drags on and regular season basketball is lost.

If you want to see the game, it is on demand at this link.

LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, opponents at long last

LeBron James, Dwyane Wade
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The initial reactions to the formation of the Miami Heat primarily stemmed from places of awe, of anger, and of bewilderment. It was a development unlike anything the NBA world had ever seen, and that people responded so strongly came as no surprise.

Yet eventually, those three very separate reactions were filtered into one. The unprecedented team sparked unprecedented public vitriol, as indignant fans, columnists, and opponents vented endlessly. They stood on a high ground propped up by their own constructions, citing everything from the destruction of competitive equity to disloyalty to the personality flaws of Miami’s stars. Something about this collaboration struck followers of the game as inherently wrong. Miami had built an empire in a day, and apparently — judging by the unrelenting hatred of some really good basketball players that wanted to play together rather than apart — it had to be destroyed. Comment by comment, tweet by tweet, brick by brick.

Lest we forget, that mission essentially began with the theoretical wedge that many tried to jam between LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the Big Two embedded within Miami’s Big Three. They were the true stars of the show, and with neither a standout jumpshooter, the first grounded (though unceasing) criticism of the team pointed out their supposed on-court incompatibilities. There were plenty of logical arguments made about where James and Wade might clash in terms of skill sets, but those sensible claims were reduced to taglines and repeated ad nauseum. Which one would lead? Which one would get the ball in crunch time? Which one would sit in the corner? Which one would run the pick-and-roll? James and Wade were pitted against each other more as teammates than they ever were as opponents, primarily due to the prescripted need to see some kind of conflict between them.

That was the plan, anyway. But James and Wade handled the pressures of the Heat’s season expertly, in no small part due to their deft decision to face the press as a duo. It wasn’t symbolism, but pragmatism; the two didn’t need to symbolize a joint front when they could literally create one that the media would be forced to encounter. No question would be thrown to Wade without LeBron within earshot and vice versa, and while that made it a bit tough for journalists digging for a salacious quote, it clarified the James-Wade dynamic: if they were pitted against each other, it was done so against their will and against their managed public appearance.

Until now.

For the first time in over a year, James and Wade have become opponents. Tickets for Saturday’s South Florida All-Star Classic — which pits Team LeBron against Team Wade — are selling like hot cakes, and while the James-Wade one-game rivalry isn’t the most compelling draw, one can’t help but wonder if it presents intrigue on some unconscious level.

James v. Wade is what the Heat faithful dreaded and so many sports fans craved, so much that the hypothetical (and false) conflict between the two was the dominant element of the team’s preseason storyline. Basketball fans finally have a chance to see that manufactured clash actualized, albeit in a form much more casual than was likely imagined. There will be no shouting matches or bad blood in the most star-laden of all the exhibition games thus far, but on the most fundamental level it will pit star against star in a way that the anticlimax of the season narrative never did. This, ladies and gentlemen, is as close as opposition gets for the leaders of the Miami Heat: James in one jersey and Wade in another, both smiling, playing, and working toward the same underlying cause.