Tag: sleeved jerseys

San Antonio Spurs v Golden State Warriors

Jarrett Jacks wants sleeved jerseys tailored specifically for individual players


During the All-Star weekend festivities in New Orleans, NBA commissioner Adam Silver said that the sleeved jerseys, which have received more than their fair share of criticism, have had no competitive impact on the outcomes of games.

But if players really have a legitimate problem with them, or even if there is a pervasive belief that they are negatively impacting performance, it’s something he would have to look at changing.

“If players believe it has any impact whatsoever on the competition, even if it’s just a perception, we need to deal with it,” Silver said.

At this rate, he will need to deal with it. Players continue to complain, as LeBron James did for the second time this season after losing to the Spurs.

Jarrett Jack, now toiling away in Cleveland as a member of the Cavaliers, was with the Warriors last year as part of the first group to wear the short-sleeved jerseys. And being a self-appointed authority on the matter, Jack says that the players would stop complaining if they had the jerseys individually tailored for a better, customized fit.

From Jodie Valade of the Cleveland Plain Dealer:

That’s why Jack has a suggestion for anyone listening in the NBA’s merchandising department: Get individual player measurements and tailor the sleeved jerseys to each player.

It seems as if that would be a hefty undertaking, but Jack counters that if the league already has provided some players with tighter jerseys (see Houston’s Dwight Howard), it wouldn’t be that much of a leap to tailor jerseys to each player.

“It wouldn’t take long,” he said. “If you went and got everybody’s measurements, it’d take five minutes. And you made those jerseys specific to everybody’s exact needs, it’d save everyone headaches.”

It’s an idea worth considering, but a player could also simply go up a size if indeed he felt the sleeves were too restrictive.

Silver will surely look at all options, especially if sales numbers on the jerseys continue to exceed expectations. But it’s a bad look for the game’s biggest stars to continually gripe about them, even if the numbers say there’s been no negative impact made by the sleeves on a league-wide basis.

“We know that shooting percentages are virtually exactly the same for games in which we have sleeved jerseys and teams in which the guys are wearing conventional jerseys,” Silver said. “So I’m pretty comfortable from a competitive standpoint that it’s having no impact.”

Even so, Jack would like to see them disappear altogether simply due to aesthetic preference.

“We’re like the Beach Police,” Jack said. “You know those police who are on the beach with those bikes? They’ve got those little shirts with the shorts? That’s what we look like. Like we about to give somebody a citation.”

NBA VP says if players ultimately don’t want to wear sleeved jerseys, league will listen

adidas NBA All-Star Jersey EAST Detail 2 Clipped

The sleeved jerseys the NBA rolled out last season and has expanded the use of this year have gotten a mixed reaction from players and fans alike.

The vote that counts, however, is the one made with dollars spent on them by the fans, and that’s why we saw all 10 teams that played on Christmas Day wearing them, and it’s why the decision was made to go with the sleeves for the All-Star game in New Orleans this season.

The league is a business, but it isn’t one that will sacrifice on-court product for a short-term money grab. So, if over time a majority of players express their unhappiness with the sleeves, the NBA might listen.

From Ric Bucher of Bleacher Report:

“We don’t have any intention to do anything that is going to compromise the play on the court or that the players are against doing,” Sal LaRocca, the NBA’s executive vice president of global merchandising said. …

In any case, LaRocca said plans for next year’s Christmas Day uniforms and the 2015 All-Star Game already are being discussed. If the All-Stars make it clear they don’t like the look or feel of this year’s uniforms, the league will respond accordingly.

“If the feedback is that the players don’t want to wear them, we won’t,” LaRocca said. “We are 50-50 partners with the players in everything we do.”

Here’s the thing: The players are making just as much money as the league is off of these and all other jersey sales. It’s a 50-50 revenue split in this area, so despite certain players expressing their unhappiness with (or blaming substandard shooting performances on) the sleeves, if fans continue to buy them in volumes that exceed expectations, the jerseys and their sleeves are likely to be here to stay.

Nets to unveil sleeved alternate jerseys

joe johnson nets sleeved alternates

The sleeved jerseys are here to stay, and a few more teams will have alternate versions featuring them before the season is finished.

The Brooklyn Nets are the latest team to reveal their version, and the blue and grey color scheme is a nod to the city’s sports history.

From ESPN.com:

With their move to Brooklyn, the Nets got rid of blue from their color palette, but in a nod to the tradition of their new home, the team is set to unveil alternate jerseys in the familiar blue and grey from the Brooklyn Dodgers days.

Sources told ESPN.com that the Nets will first wear the blue and grey sleeved jerseys for the game against the Boston Celtics on March 21 and will wear them for four other games, to be called “Brooklyn Blue Nights,” before the season is over.

The design here is more basic than, say, that of the All-Star jerseys. But they do in fact accomplish their stated goal of looking like Dodgers road uniforms.

adidas says aggregate reaction to sleeved jerseys from players and fans has been ‘very positive’

Chris Paul

NEW YORK — The 2014 All-Star jerseys were officially unveiled by the folks at adidas on Thursday, but media were invited to the company’s showroom in New York the week prior to get a look at the uniform collection in person.

Along with the sneak peek, executives from adidas and the NBA were available to discuss the sleeved design, which has been controversial among fans from the very start.

But as we continue to discuss, as long as they sell, they aren’t going anywhere. And Chris Grancio, adidas head of global basketball sports marketing confirmed that the sales of the sleeved alternate jerseys have, to this point, indeed been very strong.

“Terrific,” Grancio told NBCSports.com. “[Sales have] exceeded expectations. We’re very pleased with the results so far, and in our view, based on the way in aggregate players and consumers have reacted to it, it’s been very positive.”

That last part is contrary to what you may think if you do nothing but read basketball Twitter when the topic of the sleeved jerseys comes up, and the game’s best player in LeBron James, remember, made a point to complain about them following his poor outside shooting performance on Christmas Day against the Lakers.

The company doesn’t do any custom fitting of the jerseys, but they do, however, make samples in all sizes widely available to teams before they’re scheduled to play in them in a game that counts. And that included LeBron and the Heat long before Christmas.

“He had practiced in it,” said Christopher Arena, NBA Vice President of Apparel, Sporting Goods & Basketball Partnerships. “I’ve seen pictures.”

The majority of players, according to Grancio, say the sleeved jerseys have zero impact on their performance, and that they are a complete non-issue after a very short time.

“Probably the most consistent piece of feedback I hear from players when we go to a team practice and work with the equipment manager, put sizing samples out and they go shoot for a few minutes — the number one thing we hear back is, ‘I forget I’m wearing it,’ ” Grancio said. “With the amount of design work that went into ensuring that this jersey performs identically to a tank, we’ve really delivered that. And when I’ve been in locker rooms talking to players about it, the consensus has been, ‘after I’m out there shooting and playing for 10 or 15 minutes, I forget that it’s different.’ ”

The debate will rage on, but as long as sales continue to exceed expectations, the players are going to need to get used to it. adidas maintains that it hasn’t been a problem for most, and in fact, some players who have big games wearing them may instantly become the sleeved jerseys’ biggest supporters.

“We’ve done tremendous amounts of testing with NBA athletes,” Grancio said. “And there is no performance difference. Based on athlete feedback, based on the numbers, it really is aesthetic preference, I think.

“Chris Paul scored 40 the first time he wore one in a pre-season game, so, he’s a fan.”