Tag: Shot-blocking


Kobe tells owners to “look in the mirror”

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Kobe Bryant, when he is serious, is direct. You will not confuse what he says with what he means — it is straight and plain.

Kobe was serious when talking with CBS’s Ken Berger about the upcoming Collective Bargaining Agreement negotiations.

“I think the owners need to look in the mirror,” Bryant told CBSSports.com when asked about the $750 million to $800 million reduction in player salaries being sought by the owners. “They need to make the right judgment themselves and stop trying to force us players to be the ones to make adjustments. They’ve got to look in the mirror and decide what they want to do with the sport, and we as employees will show up and do what we’ve got to do….”

“The onus is not on us,” Bryant said. “People are trying to put that responsibility on us. It’s not our responsibility. It’s the owners’ job. This is what they do.”

It’s a simple stating of the player’s position — the owners can’t go on a massive summer spending spree then claim poverty. Revenue is going to be up this season in the NBA, if the owners are claiming massive losses then they are doing a poor job of managing their businesses.

Will the players have to give back? You bet, and they know that to a degree. Salaries may slide back a little, there will be ways for owners to get out of longer guaranteed deals that go bad.

But the real problem is not what Kobe makes, not what LeBron or Wade or Durant or Garnett makes. Those guys are the ones people pay to see play, who get people to turn on their televisions and buy jerseys. Right now, it is the middle class of NBA players that make a disproportionate amount to what they provide on the court or at the gate. Right now the big stars subsidize those guys by having limits on max deals. Kobe makes money for the Lakers, even at the $30 million a year he will make is a few years. He’s well worth the money on a purely business level. But the league’s bloated middle is an issue.

And that is on the owners. Those “bad” deals are ones they and their basketball people approved. They can’t blame the players, the owners do need to look in the mirror. They can’t ask the players to give back without much better revenue sharing and more stiff tax/fees for those who go over the cap. Level the playing field some, and maybe then those bad middle class contracts will dry up, and the owners bottom line will look better.

Dwight Howard will continue blocking shots out of bounds, thank you very much

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At last year’s MIT Sloan Stats and Analytics conference, there was some controversy and discussion surrounding a paper about the value of Dwight Howard’s blocks. John Huizinga studied shot blocks based on their possible outcomes — the offensive team keeping possession of the ball, the block leading to a defensive rebound and a change of possession, or a goaltend resulting in two free points for the offense.

Because of Howard’s tendency to swat shots out of bounds rather than tip them to his teammates and his high rate of goaltends, Huizinga found that Howard, on a block-by-block basis, had the least valuable blocks in the entire NBA.

Howard’s goaltending was a much bigger issue than his tendency to swat shots out of bounds in the study, and I don’t think anyone would argue that goaltending is bad, including Howard. However, the Orlando Sentinel’s Zach McCann reports that Dwight isn’t about to apologize for swatting shots into the stands rather than politely corralling them or redirecting them to a teammate:

On Wednesday night, Howard answered about his philosophy when blocking shots. Here’s what he had to say:

“They told me to grab them, but sometimes blocking a shot and sending it out of bounds shows a team it’s not going to be easy to come in the paint,” Howard said. “Grabbing it, that’s like being a showoff or something like that, even though it is kind of cool.”

So not only is Howard trying to block shots, he’s trying to make defenders shy away from him later in the game. He wants to send a message.

“Every block,” he says.

Howard might have a point, because Magic opponents have been absolutely terrified to take the ball to the rim this season. According to HoopData.com, the Magic only allow 15 shot attempts at the rim per game, which is the lowest mark in the NBA by a significant margin — the Thunder allow more than twice as many shots per game at the rim than the Magic. It’s impossible to give intimidation an exact statistical value, but there’s no question that what Dwight Howard is doing on defense is working.