Tag: Shaquille O’Neal

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Shaq will not be playing in the Mexican League


There was a report last week about Shaquille O’Neal possibly playing in the Mexican League. It would have been just a publicity gig, but would have worked out well for both sides. But then, the report would have to be accurate. And Shaq, speaking to the New Orleans Times-Picayune, says it isn’t.

Is there any truth to the reports that youll be playing games in the Mexican League next month?”No truth to that. Its kind of unfortunate that so-called experts have to get their sources from the Internet. Its backwards. Especially like when people from ESPN know me and they can call me and ask me, but somebody else said it so they want to be the first to report it even though its not true. However, we could talk, but nobody has contacted me.”So you definitely wont?”Probably not.”

via Shaq unplugged: Q&A with former LSU, NBA star Shaquille ONeal | NOLA.com.

So there’s that. No Mexican League basketball for Shaq.

It shouldn’t surprise anyone, O’Neal has always been conscious of how his legacy would be perceived and though he’s definitely a clown in non-basketball matters, intentionally, he’s remained dedicated to protecting his standing as one of the true greats in the game (maybe too much). He’s not ruling it out completely, but I doubt we’ll be seeing it.

Report: Shaq could play couple games in Mexican league

Former US basketball star Shaquille O'Ne

Shaquille O’Neal does not look like a guy in shape to get back on the basketball court. Frankly, he didn’t look like that his last couple of years he was still in the NBA (when the injuries mounted up).

But he may be back on the court for a couple games in the Mexican Basketball League according to Sergio Ganem, the president of the Mexican team Fuerza Regia,who confirmed talks to ESPNDeportes.com.

Shaq would play one or two games in October. The two sides have had conversations but the report says no deal is in place.

Is this a blatant publicity stunt? Heck yes. And it’s a smart one. This is the same team that had Dennis Rodman for a few games in 2004 and used 7’9” Chinese player Sun Ming Ming. It’s all about publicity stunts.

And when you’re a small league in a country where you are a minor sport, then go all Bill Veeck. Bring in anyone you want, do whatever you can to get attention.

And if Shaq is up for it, well, go for it. Not sure Shaq can even dunk anymore, but it would still be a show.

Lakers to retire Shaquille O’Neal’s number 34 on April 2


Because there were not going to be enough Dwight Howard to Shaquille O’Neal comparisons this season, best to just bring Shaq in and have him there.

The Lakers have said for a while they would retire the jersey of Shaquille O’Neal, and now a date has been set for that — April 2, reports Kevin Ding at the Orange County Register. That is a game against the Dallas Mavericks.

While some Laker fans are still (are always?) bitter about how he left and this said about Kobe Bryant, owner Jerry Buss said before Shaq would get his number retired There had been a theory that the Lakers would not retire Shaq’s jersey until after Kobe has his retired (which number for Kobe is another question). But now that Kobe has one more ring than Shaq he is magnanimous in victory so it happens sooner.

And Shaq deserves to have his jersey on the wall up there Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (who is getting a statue in front of Staples Center earlier in the season). By the way, George Mikan’s number should be up on that wall, too, even if he played in Minneapolis before the team moved to L.A. Shaq spent 8 years with the Lakers, won three titles and averaged 27 points and 11.8 rebounds a game, plus won an MVP award.

Shaq is one of the great centers to play the game, in a long line of great Lakers centers.

No pressure Dwight. None at all.

On the amazing ripple effects of the 2004 Shaq Trade

Kobe Shaquille O'Neal Lakers

Remember the Summer of 2004? The Lakers, who came into the season with Gary Payton, Karl Malone, Kobe Bryant, and Shaq making up 80% of their starting 5, had just lost a “gentlemen’s sweep” to the Detroit Pistons. Kobe Bryant was a free agent. Shaq still had that pre-max monster of a deal, and he wasn’t getting any younger or getting along with Kobe any better.

The Lakers had to make a decision, especially when Kobe forced their hand by saying that he wouldn’t come back next season if Shaq was still on the team. (Revisionist history glosses over this fact, but Phil Jackson’s book The Last Season clearly states that Phil had that exact conversation with Kobe, and Kobe re-signed with the Lakers the day after Shaq was traded. The Lakers were going to have to make a tough decision on Shaq and his huge contract anyways, but come on.)

The Lakers ultimately decided to trade Shaq for Brian Grant, Caron Butler, and Lamar Odom. After that, the following things happened:

– Okay, Brian Grant never really became important.

– The Heat had the best record in the East, a relatively svelte Shaq narrowly lost the MVP vote to Steve Nash, and the Heat took the Pistons to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals. Meanwhile, Kobe, struggling with injuries, a new coach, and new teammates, had one of the worst seasons of his career, and the Lakers actually missed the playoffs.

– Because they missed the playoffs, the Lakers got the 10th overall pick, and decided to take a risk on high school big man Andrew Bynum. This would become important later. (Meanwhile, the Warriors, who picked Todd Fuller 11th the year Kobe Bryant was drafted 13th, drafted Ike Diogu one pick ahead of Bynum. The Magic took Fran Vasquez directly after Bynum. Again, this would become important later.)

– In 05-06, after the Lakers traded Caron Butler for Kwame Brown, a healthy and motivated Bryant averaged the highest PPG of his career, but the wafer-thin Lakers lost to the Suns in 7 games. Meanwhile, the Heat were able to stun the Mavericks and win the NBA title with Shaq playing a vital role, although Miami clearly would not have come close to winning it all without Dwayne Wade’s historically great finals performance.

– At the 2007-08 trade deadline, the Lakers used Kwame Brown’s expiring contract, which came from the Caron Butler trade, which came from the Shaq trade, to acquire Pau Gasol. The Lakers went to the Finals that year and lost to the Celtics, but won the next two championships with Kobe, Pau, Lamar Odom, and Andrew Bynum (when healthy) leading the way.

– Meanwhile, Shaq, after being traded to the Suns and missing the playoffs, was acquired by the Cavaliers as a “Dwight-stopper,” and ultimately ended up helping end the LeBron era because the Cavaliers’ anti-Magic frontcourt got eaten alive by Boston’s frontcourt as the Celtics beat the Cavaliers in six games. (Yes, LeBron had some bad performances in that series, particularly game 5, but the frontcourt mismatches were a HUGE reason the Celtics shredded the Cavaliers.) You have to admit, the levels of irony here are incredible.

– After the 2010 season, LeBron James announces that he is leaving Cleveland and taking his talents to South Beach. Many people notice.


Consider this: If Wade doesn’t have a ring, do you think he would have been able to convince LeBron to leave his hometown team, which was coming off of consecutive 60+ win seasons, and become, for a time, perhaps the most hated athlete in America. (There’s a real possibility of this — LeBron wanted to play with friends/superstars, LRMR had LeBron convinced that everyone would love him no matter what, and Miami does reportedly have nice weather in the winter. Still, I think Wade’s 2006 ring really, really helped LeBron make his “decision.”


– The Heat make the Finals in each of the next two seasons, losing in 6 games in 2011 and winning in 5 games in 2012. If you’re keeping score at home and believe my theory (which may be a stretch), the Shaq trade has now led to the Heat and Lakers winning two championships apiece.

– Cut to the summer of 2012. The Lakers manage to flip Lamar Odom’s trade exception for Steve Nash, and flip Andrew Bynum, the lottery pick they got because the year directly after Shaq left was the one year they were bad enough to make the lottery, gets effectively flipped for Dwight Howard. The Lakers now have a starting lineup of Dwight Howard, Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash, Pau Gasol, and Metta World Peace, and are instant title contenders again.

So there you have it — eight years after the Lakers and Heat made a blockbuster trade for the most dominant center of this era, they each have two championships under their belt, and at least three of those four total championships can be directly traced back to the Shaq trade. On top of that, the two teams may well be on a collision course to meet in the 2013 finals, which makes the whole sequence of events that much more incredible.

Shaq says the pressure is on Howard to win in L.A.. Related: Obvious former Lakers center is obvious.

Dwight Howard Shaquille O'Neal

Shaquille O’Neal, ever the critic of Dwight Howard since Howard “stole” his Superman moniker, had some strong words for Howard coming to L.A.. It’s not going to be a cakewalk, indeed it’s going to be a huge challenge. From USA Today:

“The pressure that he has been feeling in Orlando has just multiplied by three now,” O’Neal said in comments released by TNT. “The first thing the great Jerry West did when I signed with the Lakers is he walked me into the Forum and told me to look up. He showed me all the great big men that played before me and how many championships they won. The Lakers have a tradition of having great big men. He has a lot of work ahead of him. If he thinks the Orlando Sentinel was on his case when he didn’t perform, guys like (Los Angeles Times columnist) Bill Plaschke, they don’t play.”

via Shaq, Barkley talk Dwight Howard – USATODAY.com.

O’Neal knows something of the pressure to win and has always been proud of the success he had in L.A. winning three titles. It certifies him, validates him. Howard stands in position to challenge that with the core he’s surrounded by. O’Neal was also a hugely popular cultural figure, far more than Howard, and was able to woo reporters with his charm and quotes. Howard faces a tougher approach in getting the public back on his side, but if you peruse the L.A. Times this morning, you’re going to find a whole lot of softball yogurt about the Lakers’ acquisition of Howard. It’s only if they struggle that things would turn.

Watching O’Neal cover this development on TNT will be interesting, if only because of how much he’s following in O’Neal’s footsteps, whether he likes it or not.