Tag: Shaquille O’Neal

Adidas Eurocamp - Day 2

Vlade Divac in favor of NBA’s anti-flopping rules


TREVISO, Italy — Vlade Divac was the guest speaker for day two of adidas Eurocamp, and spent some time with the international players trying to impart some of his vast knowledge of the game gleaned from a successful 16-year career in the NBA.

Divac is known as one of the great passing big men of all time, but he’s also known for bringing flopping into the NBA — if not initiating it, then certainly making it more prominent and acceptable as a way for players to gain an advantage.

The league has implemented a largely toothless anti-flopping policy in recent years, but it’s at least a start in trying to shame players into cutting down on the blatant attempts to fool the referees into making a questionable call in their team’s favor. It hasn’t had much of an effect, as we’re still seeing it go on at this late stage of the postseason.

Divac was better than anyone during his era at successfully pulling off these kinds of acting jobs, but he’s not necessarily proud of it. He’s in favor of the league trying to eliminate it from the game, but said his resorting to that strategy was simply done out of necessity.

“Whenever you overdo something, it’s time to stop it,” Divac told NBCSports.com. “So I think it’s a great decision by the NBA. But everyone is saying that’s my rule; that’s not my rule. That’s Shaq’s rule.”

Wait, you think Shaq started it?

“No, I started it because of Shaq, because they didn’t want to call fouls,” Divac said. “So that’s not my rule, that’s Shaq’s rule.”


Our interview also covered a variety of topics.

On players forcing their way out of current teams in advance of free agency (i.e., Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard, and now potentially Kevin Love):

“I’m not supporting it,” Divac said. “But you can’t do anything about it. I think loyalty from all sides should have more impact — from the teams and the players. You just can’t go to [random] places. I remember when I made the decision to go to Sacramento, all my friends, even my agent, advised me not to go because they were the worst team. But I chose to take the challenge, make sure that I do something to change it. And I did.

“For me, being a champion is the way you act and the things that you do on the way to being a champion. That’s more important. Today, I can be a champion — just go and sign with the Miami Heat, and I’ll be a champion, right?”

On the ways the game has changed since he played:

“Every year it’s become more fast and physical,” Divac said. “I don’t see big men playing with their back to the basket anymore. That’s a big minus for basketball. To have an inside-outside game, it’s very important to have big men playing with their backs to the basket.”

On being traded from the Lakers to Charlotte:

“I was devastated,” Divac said. “That first week, I just didn’t know what was happening. But you know, things happen in life that you don’t have answers until later on. I think that trade actually helped me and extended my career. It was good for me, but back then I didn’t know.”

“I talked to Jerry West or Mitch Kupchak later on, I told them now, thinking about it, I would do the same thing. Because you move Vlade, you make the salary cap to get Shaq and you get Kobe. So you got Shaq and Kobe for Vlade. It’s a no-brainer.”

Was it an honor to be part of a deal involving two Hall of Famers?

“I’m not honored,” he said with a laugh. “But I would have done the same thing.”

Dan Patrick Show: Flopping too big an issue in today’s NBA

2014 Dunk Contest: Ranking the dunks

2014 Sprite Slam Dunk Contest

Let’s get this out of the way: that was an awful, awful dunk contest. Despite one of the most star-studded fields in years and some phenomenal athletes, the 2014 dunk contest was a complete dud. Most of the blame probably lies with the new contest format which, at the risk of recycling adjectives, was unforgivably awful.

For the majority of the “freestyle” round, it would have been possible to hear a fly crash into a bed of cotton in the Smoothie King Center, and it’s not clear why anyone thought it was a good idea.

While the idea behind the “battle” round was an intriguing one, the fact is that the format caused the viewers to see far less dunks under pressure. Last year, having the 4 participants get two dunks each and the finalists get an extra two dunks apiece meant the viewing audience at home got to see 12 dunks. If you don’t count the freestyle dunks, and you really shouldn’t, we got to see six dunks this season, thanks to the East’s “sweep.” Apparently a round-robin of some kind, which would have allowed the fans to see more dunks, would have taken away from the drama of the inter-conference dunk rivalry that does not exist and nobody cares about. More dunks, in general, makes for a better dunk contest.

Okay, enough complaining. At the end of the day, we got to see dunks, and dunks are fun. Now I shall rank all six dunks that we got to see in the “battle round,” as well as the three most notable dunks of the “freestyle” round.

9) Harrison Barnes, Battle Round: Throwing down a windmill while being motion-captured for NBA 2K

When Harrison Barnes hooked himself up to something before his dunk, we knew some type of gimmick was coming, and we knew it wasn’t going to be nearly as fun for the fans as Barnes and the fine gentlemen at 2K studios probably thought it would be when they came up with it. After two misses, Barnes threw down a relatively plain windmill slam, and fans were then treated to an immediate rendering of Barnes performing the exact feat in NBA 2K graphics. I’m sure the technology behind doing that in real-time is amazing, but it was the nadir of the dunk contest.

8) Ben McLemore, Battle Round: Ben McLemore jumps over a Shaq, who was sitting in a big chair

I mean, sure, the crown, the cape, the throne, and the “Shaqramento” and “Shaqlemore” puns were bad, but at this point, we know better than to expect anything resembling subtlety from Shaq. The reason this ranks so low isn’t a reaction to the specific gimmick — it’s a reaction against the idea that “dunker jumps over thing” is enough to make an impressive dunk in and of itself anymore, especially when the person is sitting down. Plus, McLemore took two attempts to pull the dunk off. After rumors that McLemore was going to attempt a 720, this was a disappointment.

7) Terrance Ross, Battle Round: East Bay Funk Dunk, assisted by Drake

We’ve seen the between-the-legs dunk a lot at this point, and while it will always probably my favorite category of dunk, pretending that having Drake hold out a ball puts a radical new spin on an old dunk contest standby simply didn’t work for me.

6) Damian Lillard, Battle Round: Reverse 360 dunk with a lefty finish

I liked this dunk — it was smooth, it was clean, and there was a nice degree of difficulty on it — I think it should have beaten Ross’ dunk, obviously, which would at least have allowed us to see two more dunks. The dunk wasn’t anything radical, and it wasn’t thrown down with enough force or amplitude to make it amazing, so it takes this space on the list. This is the problem with the format — if Lillard had had four “official” dunks, this would have been a great dunk. With only one, it didn’t quite cut it.

5) Ben McLemore, Freestyle Round: Reaching way the hell back and slamming down a self-oop

Here’s another frustrating thing: when you can jump like Ben McLemore, you don’t need a man making a fool of himself on national television, not to mention a herald, to make your dunks impressive. A simple self-oop off the floor that forced McLemore to hang in the air as he re-adjusted himself to the toss was enough to make for a darn impressive dunk.

4) Damian Lillard, Freestyle Round: Off-the-floor self-oop East Bay Funk Dunk

Like I said, I’m a huge sucker for the between-the-legs dunk, and watching the smallest guy in the field throw one down off of a nice self-oop toss was beautiful to see. Lillard definitely should’ve saved this one for the battle round.

3) The East, Freestyle Round: 3-man alley-oop ending in a shot-clock toss to Paul George throwdown

Teammwork is fun. Dunks thrown off the shot clock are fun. Alley-oops grabbed way above the rim and thrown down with authority are super-fun. During the freestyle round, the Eastern squad combined to put all of these things into one dunk, and the result was delightful.

2) Paul George, Battle Round: Reverse-spin 360 East Bay Funk Dunk

Again, I’m a huge sucker for the between-the-legs, and I love opposite-direction spins. Plus, this was a dunk done without any props, or even an alley-oop toss, that we had never seen in a dunk contest before, which is amazing. If George had thrown it down just a little bit harder, or hit the dunk on his first try, this could have easily gotten the #1 spot.

1) John Wall, Battle Round: Over-the-mascot reverse tomahawk

You were expecting something else? This was the dunk that woke up the Smoothie King Center, just in time for the dunk contest to be over. There was some showmanship with the mascot, but it wasn’t distracting. The dunk was beautiful, clean, and he put it through on his first attempt. The hops required to pull off the dunk were apparent, and the power Wall generated with the Nique-like reverse tomahawk was shocking. Great dunk from a great dunker, and a painful reminder of what this dunk contest could have been if the contestants got more chances to show their stuff.

Shaq wants to be the “Pat Riley of comedy.” No, I don’t know what that means either.

2nd Annual Cartoon Network Hall Of Game Awards - Arrivals

When he’s not dragging down TNT’s Inside the NBA, Shaquille O’Neal has a lot of other things going on. A bunch of businesses. A brand to promote.

And a comedy tour. Shaq’s “All Star Comedy Jam” where he’s trying to get some young comedians exposure. And when talking to the Associated Press about it, he used a forced basketball analogy.

With his latest endeavor, Shaquille O’Neal now considers himself the “Pat Riley of comedy….”

“Humor is a big way to relieve stress, so me being a great leader and being an expert at organizational leadership, I could pick a team, I could pick a street ball team, I could pick a kickball team, I definitely could pick comedians,” O’Neal said.

Because kickball and comedy tours are interchangeable.

What does the “Pat Riley of comedy” even mean? Is he going to invite Stan Van Gundy on the comedy tour then kick him off and take over half way through?

I suppose he means he’s going to have success in great markets for attracting comedy free agents.

Dwyane Wade talks switch from Jordan brand to Li-Ning

China NBA

Most players grow up dreaming of wearing Jordans, of being a guy Nike promotes around the globe.

Dwyane Wade had all that — and left it for Chinese shoe brand Li-Ning.

While word of the change got out a couple weeks ago Wade addressed the switch for the first time Tuesday — not so coincidentally while the Heat were in China for a couple of preseason games against the Clippers. Where Wade is expected to play (in at least one game) and wear Li-Nings. From Tim Reynolds of the Associated Press.

”It was a great nine years, but for me, it was just time to move on,” Wade told the AP. ”I have certain goals that I want to reach and I felt that I had to leave to reach those. So I’m doing things a little differently. That’s how I am, in a sense. I’m not necessarily a status-quo type guy.”

Wade instantly becomes the face of the Li-Ning’s basketball efforts. He is the biggest name by far with the brand. While Shaquille O’Neal is an endorser that came later in his career. Also signed with the brand are Evan Turner of the Sixers and Hasheem Thabeet of the Thunder.

Wade will have his own line of apparel and the fashion-consious guy will have a lot of say on the look and design. Those things and his signature shoe are still in the design phase.

”I picked the best situation for me,” Wade said.

Li-Ning — named after and founded by the famed three-time gold medal winning Chinese gymnast, the guy who lit the cauldron at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. — is big in China, a company with more than 8,000 retail outlets. But they have had a tough time making inroads in the United States, where Nike and Jordan dominate the basketball shoe market (Nike accounts for more than 85 percent of basketball shoe sales).

Shaq has a plan for the Knicks to have a better chance against Miami which will help them not at all

LeBron James Carmelo Anthony

ESPN NY got Shaquille O’Neal to talk about the Knicks for the upcoming season, not exactly a difficult thing to do, on any topic at any time. And apparently they decided to ask him what they have to do to get past the Heat, or, what they need to do to beat the Heat if they play them in the playoffs, or regular season, or something, because here’s his answer:

“I think when Carmelo plays against LeBron (James) and (Dwyane Wade), he should take it personally, like he’s always talked about last (among the three). When Amare plays against (Chris) Bosh, he should take it personally,” O’Neal said. “That’s what I always used to do. I played against guys, I used to take it personally that you’re not talking about me.

“They need to do that. In order to beat Miami, they’ve got to.”

via Shaquille O’Neal says New York Knicks, not Brooklyn Nets, are team to beat in New York – ESPN New York.

That’s great quote material, which is what Shaq does, besides laugh really big and give himself nicknames.

But here’s the thing. The Knicks will play 82 games this season (thank God). Four of them will come against the Miami Heat. The other 78 are against other teams. And there’s a substantial set of reasons to believe they won’t face them again in the playoffs. If it’s Boston, Brooklyn, Indiana, Chicago, having this be a focus is silly. Yes, they like to think of themselves as rivals to the Heat, because, well, let’s face it, New York aims high. But the weird thing is they actually mtach up conceptually with the Heat extremely well.

A slow-it-down, grind-it-out defensive team with a high-scoring forward who likes to work out of the mid-post and Tyson Chandler protecting the rim, along with quality veteran shooters on the outside. Yeah, that’s pretty much Dallas 2011, except that Dirk Nowitzki is considerably better than Carmelo Anthony.

They match up well with them. And yet they got steamrolled in the playoffs because of the talent disparity. There’s not much that New York can do to make up for that other than “be a lot better” and I’m not sure taking it personally is going to work. Also, considering how close Melo and that whole crew in South Beach is, I wouldn’t come along expecting any bad blood.

It’s not O’Neal’s fault, he was asked a question, answered honestly. Just not sure what it is New York’s really supposed to do with that information.

(Side note: Shaq does himself a disservice by saying that he and Kobe, in the years they didn’t win a championship, only played “OK” and then saying Melo and Amar’e played “OK” last year. Bad Shaq and Kobe was still very good, like pizza. So far Melo and Amar’e sharing the floor has been a dumpster fire in a sewage refinery. )